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Article

Teresa Galanti and Michela Cortini

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reaction of female workers to the earthquake event that shocked the city of L’Aquila in April 2009, with a specific focus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reaction of female workers to the earthquake event that shocked the city of L’Aquila in April 2009, with a specific focus on work as a recovery factor.

Design/methodology/approach

The selected sample consists of current or former resident women in the affected province of L’Aquila, who participated in a series of focus group discussions on the ability to reconstruct their own professional identity after the earthquake. The focus group seemed to be the perfect instrument for this research, because of its ability to generate a true discussion among a group of people on the research topic of this study. The collected data were analyzed both in terms of metaphors, as well as linguistic agentivity and by automatic content analysis.

Findings

From the analysis of the data, emerges the value that adds to the sense of identity continuity for the women in the sample, together with interesting differences between employed and self-employed workers that are characterized by distinct challenges and assurances. In regards to the effects of gender in response to disaster events, the results make a peculiar echo to the studies on public-private space dichotomy developed by Fordham, according to which, during a disaster, women are not allowed to develop work-related desires. For the group of women that the authors interviewed, the challenge to have family focused or work focused desires was clearly evident; they seem predetermined to the above-mentioned dichotomy, valid in both directions: the women who invested in work and have become entrepreneurs seem to have no chance of a private life and, on the contrary, the women who were focused on more traditional family roles seem to have no chance in terms of job opportunities.

Originality/value

Based on the authors’ knowledge this is the first time that focus groups are used to assess the value that work had in supporting individual recovery for women in the aftermath of the L’Aquila earthquake.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article

Paula Benevene, Eric Kong, Barbara Barbieri, Massimiliano Lucchesi and Michela Cortini

The purpose of this paper is to understand the representation that senior managers of Italian social enterprises have about their organization’s intellectual capital (IC)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the representation that senior managers of Italian social enterprises have about their organization’s intellectual capital (IC), precisely about the human capital, relational capital and organizational capital.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a qualitative approach. A total of 81 senior managers were interviewed individually. Interview data were analyzed using different techniques of content analysis, particularly by using the T-Lab software (analysis of word occurrence and co-word mapping, analysis of Markovian sequences).

Findings

Findings confirm the divide between theory and practice of IC. The representation of the IC dimensions is rather different from the definition that is found in the academic literature. Limited awareness about IC components and their generative power of knowledge determines a limited exploitation of the social enterprises’ organizational knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The group reached is limited to Italy and is not statistically representative of all Italian social enterprises.

Practical implications

Social enterprises are crucial in the development and well-being of societies. However, the findings suggest that many social enterprises managers are not fully aware of the importance of IC and how it may create value for their organizations. This paper stresses that senior managers of social enterprises need to, through various methods, have a better understanding of IC management and knowledge creation if they are to fully utilise the potential of IC in their organizations for survival and growth.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to explore the perception of IC’s components among social enterprises, which represent an important development of non-profit organizations.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article

Paula Benevene, Eric Kong, Massimiliano Lucchesi and Michela Cortini

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the knowledge on the role played by the intellectual capital (IC) of small and medium non-profit socio-cooperatives (SMSCs) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the knowledge on the role played by the intellectual capital (IC) of small and medium non-profit socio-cooperatives (SMSCs) in generating knowledge and organisational growth, as well as on the challenges and the difficulties of the management of IC among these organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study adopted a qualitative methodology. A total of 70 semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior managers of Italian non-profit SMSCs, asking them to talk about the management of their human capital, organisational capital and relational capital. The data gathered from the interviews were analysed through discourse analysis carried out by two independent judges.

Findings

IC management among Italian non-profit SMSCs is unplanned, unsystematic and short-termed. The SMSCs in question adopt an employee-centred approach; their IC management and knowledge creation are more focused on the direct contribution of the organisational members, than on the endorsement of formal or structured procedures and processes. Owing to their social aim, the well-being of both the workers and the beneficiaries of the SMSCs plays a central role in the IC management. Relationships with external stakeholders are regarded as important as those with the internal ones, re-affirming the organisations’ members as the core of the knowledge generation.

Research limitations/implications

The group reached is not a statistically representative sample; furthermore, it is limited to Italy.

Social/implications

Deepening the knowledge on IC among these organisations can help to promote the strengths and address the weaknesses of its management, whilst also helping these micro-enterprises to develop into SMEs.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the IC literature by shedding light on the role played by IC among small and medium enterprise (SMEs), and more specifically in the specific context of Italian SMSCs. To the authors’ knowledge, no previous research has thus far dealt with this issue. Deepening the knowledge on IC among these organisations can help to promote the strengths and address the weaknesses of its management, while also helping these micro-enterprises to develop into SMEs.

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Article

Michela Cortini

The purpose of this paper was to explore if and to what extent workplace identity can mediate the relationship between learning climate dimensions and job satisfaction in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to explore if and to what extent workplace identity can mediate the relationship between learning climate dimensions and job satisfaction in a group of apprentices.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered thanks to a non-profit organization devoted to vocational training. Participants (N = 87) were apprentices working in different job contexts in central Italy.

Findings

Results showed that the relationship between learning climate and job satisfaction was mediated by workplace identity.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate the effect of learning climate and workplace identity on job satisfaction during apprenticeship.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Paula Benevene and Michela Cortini

This explorative research aims at examining the social representation of psychosocial training in NPOs managers.

Abstract

Purpose

This explorative research aims at examining the social representation of psychosocial training in NPOs managers.

Design/methodology/approach

An adopted multiple research approach was adopted to analyse a corpus of qualitative data. A detailed semi‐structured interview was administered to 122 senior managers of as many Italian NPOs. Interviews were analyzed using different techniques of content analysis and, run through the software T‐Lab (analysis of word occurrence and co‐word mapping, analysis of Markovian sequences).

Findings

Italian NPOs' organizational culture seem to be action‐oriented and self‐referral, rather than knowledge‐oriented. Training is not considered as a tool for strategic management of HR. Senior managers are mainly self‐taught, trained on‐the‐job and, lack of a proper competence on HR management.

Research limitations/implications

The group reached is a convenience sample and not a statistical representative sample.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that intellectual capital can be an effective tool to address Italian NPOs self‐referential knowledge and overcome their gaps in strategic management of human resources.

Originality/value

NPOs' senior manager training has rarely been addressed; in addition, the adopted methodology mixes different techniques of analysis.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini, Paula Benevene, Michela Cortini, Lisa Di Lemma and Michael West

The aim of this paper is to present the Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory (the ATPI), to assess its psychometric properties and whether its factor…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory (the ATPI), to assess its psychometric properties and whether its factor structure reflects the input-process-output (I-P-O) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The ATPI was administered to 702 Italian employees working in teams, recruited from the National Health Service (50.3 percent) and from public and private organizations (49.7 percent). To assess the psychometric properties of the ATPI's items, evaluation of discriminating power was performed. In addition to the reliability analyses, a confirmatory factor analysis of the full I-P-O model was also conducted.

Findings

Significant results of the Italian version of the ATPI arise from the psychometric properties, dimensions and factor structure. Results align with the English version of the inventory.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited and was not selected randomly. Future research should, therefore, expand the sample size and involve several types of Italian organizations. Considering these significant results, future research should validate the Italian version of the ATPI.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, the Italian literature is missing instruments for the assessment of team performance in organizations. Consequently, the present study provides evidence of the value of the Italian version of the ATPI.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article

Paula Benevene and Michela Cortini

This explorative research aims at examining the relationship between human capital and structural capital in Italian NPOs, focusing on senior managers.

Abstract

Purpose

This explorative research aims at examining the relationship between human capital and structural capital in Italian NPOs, focusing on senior managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Administration of a semi‐structured interview to 122 senior managers of the same number of Italian NPOs. Interviews have been analyzed using different techniques: content analysis, run through the software T‐Lab (analysis of word occurrence and co‐word mapping, analysis of Markovian sequences), as well as discourse analysis carried out by two independent judges.

Findings

Italian NPOs' organizational culture is action‐oriented and self‐referral, not knowledge‐oriented. Training is not considered as a tool for strategic management of HR. Senior managers are mainly self‐taught and lack adequate competence on HR management. Organizational culture does not help the development of human capital as it neither uses structured procedures to select the best candidates, nor develops a training programme based on the organizational specific needs.

Research limitations/implications

The group approached is a convenience sample, not a statistical representative sample.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that intellectual capital can be an effective tool to address Italian NPOs' self‐referential knowledge and overcome their gaps in strategic management of human resources.

Originality/value

NPOs' senior manager training has rarely been addressed; in addition, the adopted methodology triangulates different qualitative techniques of analysis.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Ann Minton and Jane Lowe

The purpose of this paper is to review a range of mechanisms used by universities to support employers to facilitate effective “on the job learning” for apprentices. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review a range of mechanisms used by universities to support employers to facilitate effective “on the job learning” for apprentices. It reflects on how these mechanisms can be used to address some of the challenges, reported in the literature that employers face to in supporting apprentices in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A short questionnaire administered to colleagues prior to attendance at a workshop, identified a range of activities, at various stages of engagement with employers that were used by universities to facilitate effective workplace learning and also to address some of the challenges faced by employers. These activities were then discussed and explored within the workshop to identify areas of best practice from the HEI sector to promote effective workplace learning.

Findings

Engagement with employers needs to occur from the outset of the development of the apprenticeship. Embedding the on the job learning within the design of the academic programme, with explicit links between the theoretical learning (knowledge element of the apprenticeship standard) and practical application of learning (skills and behaviours within the apprenticeship standard). Regular interactions with a range of staff within the employer ensure that there is a clear understanding throughout the apprentice’s journey, of how to promote an effective learning environment for the apprentice within the context of the organisation. The role of the workplace facilitator/mentor key. A range of approaches to providing training and ongoing support for facilitators/mentors was identified.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the participants within the workshop at the conference, a self-selecting group from a relatively small number of HE providers. The HEIs represented provided apprenticeships in a range of subject areas, working with both public sector and private sector providers. Further studies are required to encompass a broader range of providers, including drawing on best practice from the FE and independent sector, and applying principles used there in the context of HE.

Practical implications

Engagement with employers from an early stage of the development of the apprenticeship is imperative, viewing the apprenticeship holistically, rather than as an academic programme with some work-based activities. Resources need to be devoted to regular and frequent contact with a range of personnel within the employer organisation, so that a partnership approach to supporting learning is developed. Training and ongoing support for work-based mentors/facilitators continues to be a key success factor. This needs to be managed to balance the learning needs of the mentors with the potential impact on workplace productivity.

Social implications

The paper identifies a range of approaches that will enhance the effectiveness of learning in the workplace. This will both enhance the apprentice’s learning experience and ensure that higher and degree apprenticeships are developed holistically, meeting the academic requirements of the university and the workplace needs of the employer. This, in turn, will enhance success rates and reduce attrition rates from apprenticeships, which, in turn, may encourage more employers to engage with higher and degree apprenticeships.

Originality/value

The paper collates a range of best practice from the sector to promote effective workplace learning.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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