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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Bruno Papaleo, Giovanna Cangiano and Sara Calicchia

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a training course on chemicals for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals. The study aims were to…

1082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a training course on chemicals for occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals. The study aims were to assess the effectiveness of the course; to find out what type of training met these workers' needs best, as their role is vital in the management of safety at work; and to test a qualitative assessment method using T‐LAB software for content analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Together with traditional methods for assessing reactions and learning, a qualitative method based on interviews was used, whose content was then analyzed with software for content and text analysis (T‐LAB). The interviews were designed to bring to light critical points, training needs and the participants' expectations of this course.

Findings

The questionnaires on appreciation and learning indicated that on the whole the course was appreciated and the information provided had been learned and remembered adequately. However, qualitative evaluation brought to light some specific problems: participants' main difficulty was the practical application of what they had learned. They therefore asked primarily for technical and regulatory information, particularly guidelines and procedures, but also for training in the more complex managerial and organizational skills.

Originality/value

Qualitative methods and tools can show up better and in more detail training needs, critical points and problems that can easily be overlooked if not specifically sought. The method proposed for qualitative assessment using content analysis software gives effective, methodologically valid feedback even on small samples; it serves for assessing aspects such as the transferability and applicability of what has been learned, and its impact on work and behavior and on organization.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Paula Benevene and Michela Cortini

This explorative research aims at examining the social representation of psychosocial training in NPOs managers.

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Abstract

Purpose

This explorative research aims at examining the social representation of psychosocial training in NPOs managers.

Design/methodology/approach

An adopted multiple research approach was adopted to analyse a corpus of qualitative data. A detailed semi‐structured interview was administered to 122 senior managers of as many Italian NPOs. Interviews were analyzed using different techniques of content analysis and, run through the software T‐Lab (analysis of word occurrence and co‐word mapping, analysis of Markovian sequences).

Findings

Italian NPOs' organizational culture seem to be action‐oriented and self‐referral, rather than knowledge‐oriented. Training is not considered as a tool for strategic management of HR. Senior managers are mainly self‐taught, trained on‐the‐job and, lack of a proper competence on HR management.

Research limitations/implications

The group reached is a convenience sample and not a statistical representative sample.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that intellectual capital can be an effective tool to address Italian NPOs self‐referential knowledge and overcome their gaps in strategic management of human resources.

Originality/value

NPOs' senior manager training has rarely been addressed; in addition, the adopted methodology mixes different techniques of analysis.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Paula Benevene and Michela Cortini

This explorative research aims at examining the relationship between human capital and structural capital in Italian NPOs, focusing on senior managers.

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Abstract

Purpose

This explorative research aims at examining the relationship between human capital and structural capital in Italian NPOs, focusing on senior managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Administration of a semi‐structured interview to 122 senior managers of the same number of Italian NPOs. Interviews have been analyzed using different techniques: content analysis, run through the software T‐Lab (analysis of word occurrence and co‐word mapping, analysis of Markovian sequences), as well as discourse analysis carried out by two independent judges.

Findings

Italian NPOs' organizational culture is action‐oriented and self‐referral, not knowledge‐oriented. Training is not considered as a tool for strategic management of HR. Senior managers are mainly self‐taught and lack adequate competence on HR management. Organizational culture does not help the development of human capital as it neither uses structured procedures to select the best candidates, nor develops a training programme based on the organizational specific needs.

Research limitations/implications

The group approached is a convenience sample, not a statistical representative sample.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that intellectual capital can be an effective tool to address Italian NPOs' self‐referential knowledge and overcome their gaps in strategic management of human resources.

Originality/value

NPOs' senior manager training has rarely been addressed; in addition, the adopted methodology triangulates different qualitative techniques of analysis.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Emanuela Saita, Monica Accordini and Del Loewenthal

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of a phototherapeutic technique called “Talking Pictures” within the forensic setting. This approach involves the use of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of a phototherapeutic technique called “Talking Pictures” within the forensic setting. This approach involves the use of a set of photographs to facilitate clients’ disclosure, self-growth and promote the development of positive self-narratives. The use of art therapies and the construction of adaptive identity narratives have been proven to support desistance and increase resocialization in the prison population.

Design/methodology/approach

A 42-year-old Italian male offender was met for six therapy sessions and invited to talk about his past, present and future through the use of photographs. Session transcripts were analysed using the software for linguistic analysis T-LAB.

Findings

Results show a progression in the language used during the sessions: in the beginning the client uses a denotative language with many concrete nouns and no emotional words, in subsequent sessions his speech begins to assume more symbolic connotations and emotional words are used to describe past traumas as well as to find new meanings to present events. Moreover, the fixity of the client’s self-image is contrasted with the emergence of new sides to his personality encompassing agency and self-worth.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a single case, therefore results cannot be generalised to the prison population; moreover, the absence of any follow-up and standardized measurements of the client’s progression should be addressed by future research by both involving larger samples and including follow-up and quantitative measures of the study results.

Practical implications

The paper provides details on an innovative technique that might be used to explore the offenders’ goods and values and to develop truly redemptive rehabilitation programmes.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the scant literature on phototherapy in prisons and connects it with a reflection on desistance indicating that phototherapeutic interventions might be used to promote positive self-narratives, thus increasing desistance.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Paula Benevene, Eric Kong, Barbara Barbieri, Massimiliano Lucchesi and Michela Cortini

The purpose of this paper is to understand the representation that senior managers of Italian social enterprises have about their organization’s intellectual capital (IC)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the representation that senior managers of Italian social enterprises have about their organization’s intellectual capital (IC), precisely about the human capital, relational capital and organizational capital.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a qualitative approach. A total of 81 senior managers were interviewed individually. Interview data were analyzed using different techniques of content analysis, particularly by using the T-Lab software (analysis of word occurrence and co-word mapping, analysis of Markovian sequences).

Findings

Findings confirm the divide between theory and practice of IC. The representation of the IC dimensions is rather different from the definition that is found in the academic literature. Limited awareness about IC components and their generative power of knowledge determines a limited exploitation of the social enterprises’ organizational knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The group reached is limited to Italy and is not statistically representative of all Italian social enterprises.

Practical implications

Social enterprises are crucial in the development and well-being of societies. However, the findings suggest that many social enterprises managers are not fully aware of the importance of IC and how it may create value for their organizations. This paper stresses that senior managers of social enterprises need to, through various methods, have a better understanding of IC management and knowledge creation if they are to fully utilise the potential of IC in their organizations for survival and growth.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to explore the perception of IC’s components among social enterprises, which represent an important development of non-profit organizations.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Lea Iaia, Demetris Vrontis, Amedeo Maizza, Monica Fait, Paola Scorrano and Federica Cavallo

The purpose of this paper is to identify the distinctive elements of CSR communications that characterize the communications models of family businesses in the Italian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the distinctive elements of CSR communications that characterize the communications models of family businesses in the Italian wine industry, and to compare them with nonfamily businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, a sample of large and medium companies practicing corporate social responsibility was identified. The content of their websites was examined using content analysis and text mining (correspondence analysis techniques and word association analysis using the T-Lab software).

Findings

The analysis indicates that the ownership structure nature makes a difference in the online CSR communications process. The cultural identity in both family and nonfamily businesses is founded on intangible factors such as tradition; however, being a family business is a fundamental driver in the online CSR communications process, no longer forming a bond among players in the wine industry, but rather linking with other wine family businesses.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this work is the small size of the investigated sample. An added value it contributes is its focus on the Italian wine industry. The paper provides the essential elements that family and nonfamily wine businesses should consider in customizing their CSR communications with the brand’s specific details.

Originality/value

The authors highlighted the similarities and differences of family and nonfamily wine businesses in terms of their online CSR communications. The authors also observed how the family wine business identity, in its multidimensional construct, has common factors with what we call “familiness.” This research could establish a starting point for further work within this important sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Social Recruitment in HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-695-6

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Teresa Galanti and Michela Cortini

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reaction of female workers to the earthquake event that shocked the city of L’Aquila in April 2009, with a specific focus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reaction of female workers to the earthquake event that shocked the city of L’Aquila in April 2009, with a specific focus on work as a recovery factor.

Design/methodology/approach

The selected sample consists of current or former resident women in the affected province of L’Aquila, who participated in a series of focus group discussions on the ability to reconstruct their own professional identity after the earthquake. The focus group seemed to be the perfect instrument for this research, because of its ability to generate a true discussion among a group of people on the research topic of this study. The collected data were analyzed both in terms of metaphors, as well as linguistic agentivity and by automatic content analysis.

Findings

From the analysis of the data, emerges the value that adds to the sense of identity continuity for the women in the sample, together with interesting differences between employed and self-employed workers that are characterized by distinct challenges and assurances. In regards to the effects of gender in response to disaster events, the results make a peculiar echo to the studies on public-private space dichotomy developed by Fordham, according to which, during a disaster, women are not allowed to develop work-related desires. For the group of women that the authors interviewed, the challenge to have family focused or work focused desires was clearly evident; they seem predetermined to the above-mentioned dichotomy, valid in both directions: the women who invested in work and have become entrepreneurs seem to have no chance of a private life and, on the contrary, the women who were focused on more traditional family roles seem to have no chance in terms of job opportunities.

Originality/value

Based on the authors’ knowledge this is the first time that focus groups are used to assess the value that work had in supporting individual recovery for women in the aftermath of the L’Aquila earthquake.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Myriam Martí-Sánchez, Desamparados Cervantes-Zacarés and Arturo Ortigosa-Blanch

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how the media addresses entrepreneurship and to identify the attributes linked to this phenomenon.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how the media addresses entrepreneurship and to identify the attributes linked to this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is defined in terms of a linguistic corpus comprised of content related to entrepreneurship drawn from the digital editions of the three most important Spanish economic newspapers for the period 2010–2017. Word association and co-occurrence analyses were carried out. Further, a non-supervised clustering process was used as the basis for a thematic analysis.

Findings

Correspondence between social and media patterns related to the entrepreneurship phenomenon is revealed by the results. It is shown how attributes such as “success”, “innovation”, “ecosystem” and “woman” appear as very relevant and are linked to different co-occurrence scenarios. Relevant thematic groups are also identified related to lexical associations such as innovation, digital economy and public policies linked to entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to emphasise that this study has identified and explored relationships between words, but not their evolution. Furthermore, conclusions cannot be drawn concerning whether there are differences in how each newspaper has dealt with entrepreneurship because of the way the corpus was constructed.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical evidence that helps to identify the way media approaches entrepreneurship. The authors carried out the analysis on the media contents and not on the perception of the public on the phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

David R. Millen and Susan M. Dray

Informal groups of professional workers are forming online communities to create and share information with each other. This paper offers an analysis of an online…

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Abstract

Informal groups of professional workers are forming online communities to create and share information with each other. This paper offers an analysis of an online community of news reporters. Through participant observation in the group electronic discussion, and analysis of archival copies of the group conversation, the authors explore the ways in which this group requests and offers assistance to each other. The types of information created are examined and the temporal characteristics of the group are explored. The analysis revealed a vibrant online community of professionals who use the online communication medium to compliment professional face to face meetings and other forms of communication such as newsletters and journals.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 88