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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Caleb Wright

A discussion piece of how apprenticeships can be used by HEIs as employers.

Abstract

Purpose

A discussion piece of how apprenticeships can be used by HEIs as employers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the current apprenticeship landscape; what HEIs are already doing with apprenticeships; the arguments for using apprenticeships in the sector. There is then a case study on how the University of Birmingham uses apprenticeships before a discussion about future directions.

Findings

The paper reports that although there are a range of advantages for using apprenticeships, HEIs could still use apprenticeships more.

Originality/value

This paper uses a range of sources as detailed in the reference.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Isa Mutlib

This paper outlines the UK Government's move to increase the numbers of apprentices. It explores how employers are looking to increase take up of apprenticeships with…

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111

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines the UK Government's move to increase the numbers of apprentices. It explores how employers are looking to increase take up of apprenticeships with focus on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities, the solutions they have identified and the role of higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is the viewpoint of the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance and its Director through engaging with BAME apprentices and collecting a variety of research to show the benefit of recruiting from BAME backgrounds for individuals and organisations. Examples of good practices are included.

Findings

This paper shows there has been an increased effort from UK Government to increase apprenticeship representation from BAME communities. The UK Government has supported the role of apprentices in raising awareness of apprenticeships through recognition of their work.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the last five years from when the first degree apprenticeship was announced in 2015. Its real impact must be measured after a degree apprentice graduates finding what influence this has on job role, salary and subsequently promoting it to prospective apprentices from under-represented communities.

Practical implications

Practical implications include promoting apprentices as role models for the community and engaging with regional and stakeholder networks between HEIs, employers and the Government to share best practice.

Originality/value

Initiatives mentioned within this paper are original to the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Anthea Hollist

In 2011, Skills CFA was successful in gaining funding to develop two Higher Apprenticeships in Human Resource Management (HRM) and Project management. The purpose of this…

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250

Abstract

Purpose

In 2011, Skills CFA was successful in gaining funding to develop two Higher Apprenticeships in Human Resource Management (HRM) and Project management. The purpose of this paper is to present case studies of how these apprenticeship frameworks have been developed and future benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

Information presented in the paper is drawn from the organisation's own work in developing two Higher Apprenticeship programmes. It builds on information incorporated in the original bid and project plan, as well as on‐going evaluation of how the programme is progressing.

Findings

Recent studies undertaken by CIPD and CFA show that employers are becoming more accepted in the HR and professional sector, with a number of respondents feeling that the development of such frameworks will help attract good quality candidates to the profession. Within the sector there are very few graduate training schemes and limited funds to support the development of individuals. The paper highlights how the two schemes have been created in response to these issues and also how it can support development of the sector.

Originality/value

The paper is based on the author's own experience and employer consultation. It presents a case study of an apprenticeship programme specific to the author's organisation.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Alison Felce

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management, organisation, inspection and funding have little in common with those familiar to higher education. Higher level and degree apprenticeships have brought together different cultures and methods of designing, delivering and assessing knowledge, skills and behaviours, funding learners and learning providers, data reporting, quality management and its review or inspection. The purpose of this paper is to establish the primary concerns about managing quality in degree apprenticeships, the challenges the variances bring, how the challenges are being resolved and future work that may be required.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of a range of guidance and organisations involved in managing the quality of higher education in apprenticeships was undertaken. The primary focus is on the advice and guidance provided through the Quality Code and associated documentation, which are key to managing and assuring standards and quality in UK higher education. In addition, requirements and guidance provided through other bodies is considered along with the cross-sector groups charged with developing quality assurance processes for apprenticeships at all levels.

Findings

The paper shows a range of detailed guidance available to those entering the higher and degree apprenticeships arena and how the organisations involved in quality assurance of apprenticeships are working together to remove or mitigate concerns to ensure that quality is embedded and successfully managed.

Originality/value

Designing and delivering higher level and degree apprenticeships is a relatively new addition to UK higher education providers. There are long established practices to assure the quality and standards of UK higher education wherever and, however, it is delivered, in the UK, overseas and through online models. Apprenticeships across the UK have changed significantly over recent years, and new models, organisations and methods of working and funding have been introduced. This paper brings together key activity by the Quality Assurance Agency and other stakeholders to show how standards and quality can be managed and assured.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Mandy Samantha Crawford-Lee

The purpose of this paper is to provide a short overview of current government policy and context to the development of higher and degree apprenticeships and the…

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513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a short overview of current government policy and context to the development of higher and degree apprenticeships and the engagement of higher education (HE) providers in delivery to achieve the ambition of three million apprenticeship starts by 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

Opinion piece contextualising the UK Government’s approach to apprenticeship reforms and the role of HE and further education in the design and development and delivery of higher and degree apprenticeships.

Findings

The apprenticeship system is at a critical stage of development and HE providers need to embrace the opportunities and address the competitive challenges of apprenticeship delivery given the £2.5 billion per annum that will be raised by the apprenticeship levy and the threat to their existing and traditional HE provision.

Originality/value

Reflects the ambition and mission of the University Vocational Awards Council.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Denise Baker and David Robertshaw

This paper reflects on changes to end-point assessment (EPA) brought about as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and considers how proposed future change will impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reflects on changes to end-point assessment (EPA) brought about as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and considers how proposed future change will impact on training providers and employers of health apprentices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an analysis of apprenticeship policy, the role of EPA and consideration of assessment strategies used in higher education and health professions. Implications for policy, training providers and clinical practice are proposed.

Findings

These changes will bring the completion of EPA closer to education providers and allow them to take a more direct role within the process. Education providers will need to be issued with clear guidance to ensure regulatory compliance. The pedagogical value of EPA is questioned.

Originality/value

Training providers and policymakers will need to review their processes and guidance appropriately. This paper provides a summary of salient points needing consideration.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Jonathan Garnett

The article identifies and examines key elements of a work-based learning framework to consider their use as part of the higher education response to the apprenticeship

Abstract

Purpose

The article identifies and examines key elements of a work-based learning framework to consider their use as part of the higher education response to the apprenticeship agenda for the public sector in England.

Design/methodology/approach

This article draws upon work-based learning academic literature and the authors 28 years’ experience of the development and implementation of work-based learning at higher education level in the UK and internationally.

Findings

The article suggests that while the experience of work-based learning at higher education level appears to offer many ready-made tools and approaches for the development and delivery of higher and degree apprenticeships, these should not be adopted uncritically and in some cases may require significant repurposing.

Research limitations/implications

This article is intended to inform practitioners developing degree apprenticeships. Given the degree apprenticeship is still at a relatively early stage in its implementation, this has limited the extent to which it has been possible to review entire degree implementation to the point of participant graduation.

Practical implications

The article draws upon real-life implementation of innovative curriculum design and is of direct practical relevance to the design and operation of work-based learning for degree apprenticeships.

Social implications

Degree apprenticeships have the potential to increase productivity and enhance social mobility. Effective design and implementation of degree apprenticeships in the public sector has the potential to make a significant impact on the quality of public services.

Originality/value

The article provides an informed and sustained examination of how degree apprenticeships, especially those designed for public sector employees, might build upon previous higher education experience in work-based learning.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Stan Lester

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study funded by the Edge Foundation, an independent educational charity, to investigate what is needed in order for English…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study funded by the Edge Foundation, an independent educational charity, to investigate what is needed in order for English higher education to operate degree apprenticeships (DAs) on a sustainable basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, conducted in 2019–2020, took the form of a literature review, semi-structured interviews with employers, institutional staff members and apprentices in three fields, and an open online survey.

Findings

This study illustrates a high level of support for DAs amongst those who are involved in them, whether as educators, employers or apprentices. Degree Apprenticeships aid public-sector recruitment, support progression routes and social mobility within the existing workforce, and contribute to recruitment and productivity in public services and economically critical industries. Practices in the organisation and delivery of apprenticeships are variable, but a clear need is illustrated for strong institution–employer partnerships, integration between on- and off-the-job learning, expansive workplace learning environments, and co-ordination of assessment and quality assurance. There is also a need for external bodies to provide a consistent policy and funding environment.

Practical implications

The findings illustrate the need for strong partnerships, for programmes that are designed from the ground up as apprenticeships, and for effective integration of apprentices into the organisation's working environment.

Originality/value

This study updates and adds to the literature on DAs and work-integrated higher education. It emphasises three aspects that have hitherto been given little attention: the value of DAs for public-sector recruitment and for creating social mobility within the existing workforce, and the importance of ensuring apprenticeships are aligned with organisational objectives.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Takuro Tsukube and Makoto Matsuo

Although cognitive apprenticeship has been widely used in various educational fields, few empirical studies have examined its effectiveness in a workplace context. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Although cognitive apprenticeship has been widely used in various educational fields, few empirical studies have examined its effectiveness in a workplace context. This study aims to investigate the effects of cognitive apprenticeship on junior doctors’ perceived professional growth in hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective questionnaire survey was performed that asked surgeons (n = 87) and physicians (n = 92) to recall how they were instructed by their supervisors during the first five years after graduation from medical school.

Findings

The results of multiple regression analyzes showed that all dimensions of cognitive apprenticeship (modeling, coaching, scaffolding, articulation, reflection and exploration) had positive effects on each doctor’s perceived growth, regardless of the type of clinical practice (surgeon vs physician) or the period of supervision. It was also found that physicians experienced significantly more coaching and scaffolding, and opportunities for, articulation and reflection, than surgeons.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the data were collected through snowball sampling, and this study used a retrospective survey in which respondents were asked to recall past experiences.

Practical implications

Clinical supervisors in hospitals should adopt a cognitive apprenticeship model when supervising junior doctors. Surgical supervisors need to be more conscious of the benefits of cognitive apprenticeship.

Originality/value

This study confirmed that the six dimensions of cognitive apprenticeship had positive influences on the perceived growth of junior doctors, regardless of their clinical domains or period of supervision and that clinical domains influence the implementation of cognitive apprenticeship.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Finbar Lillis and Angelo Varetto

The purpose of this paper is to show how and why government discoursal constraints have obstructed the development of viable degree apprenticeships for regulated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how and why government discoursal constraints have obstructed the development of viable degree apprenticeships for regulated healthcare professionals working in England and suggests some ways these constraints can now be managed and overcome.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an analysis of published literature, reviews of government and health professional body policies and regulations and semi-structured interviews recorded with those leading on the development of degree apprenticeships in healthcare-regulated professions.

Findings

Once created, a bureaucracy tends to look for ways to control discourse, to sustain itself and to extend its reach. In doing so, fault lines may be exposed which undermine the position of that bureaucracy, but it will continue to control discourses to maintain power over those it requires to act. There is no pedagogical need for End Point Assessment (EPA) to measure the competence of regulated healthcare professionals. The paper produces evidence to show how meeting health professional registration requirements is a sufficient metric for measuring successful degree apprenticeship outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examined current practices relating to the registered nurse and nursing associate degree apprenticeships only. The validity of EPA for measuring occupational competence should be further investigated.

Practical implications

The NHS and other public service organisations should use these findings to re-examine and challenge the requirements for EPA in degree apprenticeships for all regulated professions.

Originality/value

Understanding how “centering” bureaucracies control discourse in their interests can help those in their orbit find ways to challenge and alter the course of policy.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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