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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Anthea Hollist

In 2011, Skills CFA was successful in gaining funding to develop two Higher Apprenticeships in Human Resource Management (HRM) and Project management. The purpose of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

In 2011, Skills CFA was successful in gaining funding to develop two Higher Apprenticeships in Human Resource Management (HRM) and Project management. The purpose of this paper is to present case studies of how these apprenticeship frameworks have been developed and future benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

Information presented in the paper is drawn from the organisation's own work in developing two Higher Apprenticeship programmes. It builds on information incorporated in the original bid and project plan, as well as on‐going evaluation of how the programme is progressing.

Findings

Recent studies undertaken by CIPD and CFA show that employers are becoming more accepted in the HR and professional sector, with a number of respondents feeling that the development of such frameworks will help attract good quality candidates to the profession. Within the sector there are very few graduate training schemes and limited funds to support the development of individuals. The paper highlights how the two schemes have been created in response to these issues and also how it can support development of the sector.

Originality/value

The paper is based on the author's own experience and employer consultation. It presents a case study of an apprenticeship programme specific to the author's organisation.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Alison Felce

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management, organisation, inspection and funding have little in common with those familiar to higher education. Higher level and degree apprenticeships have brought together different cultures and methods of designing, delivering and assessing knowledge, skills and behaviours, funding learners and learning providers, data reporting, quality management and its review or inspection. The purpose of this paper is to establish the primary concerns about managing quality in degree apprenticeships, the challenges the variances bring, how the challenges are being resolved and future work that may be required.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of a range of guidance and organisations involved in managing the quality of higher education in apprenticeships was undertaken. The primary focus is on the advice and guidance provided through the Quality Code and associated documentation, which are key to managing and assuring standards and quality in UK higher education. In addition, requirements and guidance provided through other bodies is considered along with the cross-sector groups charged with developing quality assurance processes for apprenticeships at all levels.

Findings

The paper shows a range of detailed guidance available to those entering the higher and degree apprenticeships arena and how the organisations involved in quality assurance of apprenticeships are working together to remove or mitigate concerns to ensure that quality is embedded and successfully managed.

Originality/value

Designing and delivering higher level and degree apprenticeships is a relatively new addition to UK higher education providers. There are long established practices to assure the quality and standards of UK higher education wherever and, however, it is delivered, in the UK, overseas and through online models. Apprenticeships across the UK have changed significantly over recent years, and new models, organisations and methods of working and funding have been introduced. This paper brings together key activity by the Quality Assurance Agency and other stakeholders to show how standards and quality can be managed and assured.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Caleb Wright

A discussion piece of how apprenticeships can be used by HEIs as employers.

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Abstract

Purpose

A discussion piece of how apprenticeships can be used by HEIs as employers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the current apprenticeship landscape; what HEIs are already doing with apprenticeships; the arguments for using apprenticeships in the sector. There is then a case study on how the University of Birmingham uses apprenticeships before a discussion about future directions.

Findings

The paper reports that although there are a range of advantages for using apprenticeships, HEIs could still use apprenticeships more.

Originality/value

This paper uses a range of sources as detailed in the reference.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Isa Mutlib

This paper outlines the UK Government's move to increase the numbers of apprentices. It explores how employers are looking to increase take up of apprenticeships with…

176

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines the UK Government's move to increase the numbers of apprentices. It explores how employers are looking to increase take up of apprenticeships with focus on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities, the solutions they have identified and the role of higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is the viewpoint of the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance and its Director through engaging with BAME apprentices and collecting a variety of research to show the benefit of recruiting from BAME backgrounds for individuals and organisations. Examples of good practices are included.

Findings

This paper shows there has been an increased effort from UK Government to increase apprenticeship representation from BAME communities. The UK Government has supported the role of apprentices in raising awareness of apprenticeships through recognition of their work.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the last five years from when the first degree apprenticeship was announced in 2015. Its real impact must be measured after a degree apprentice graduates finding what influence this has on job role, salary and subsequently promoting it to prospective apprentices from under-represented communities.

Practical implications

Practical implications include promoting apprentices as role models for the community and engaging with regional and stakeholder networks between HEIs, employers and the Government to share best practice.

Originality/value

Initiatives mentioned within this paper are original to the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Mandy Samantha Crawford-Lee

The purpose of this paper is to provide a short overview of current government policy and context to the development of higher and degree apprenticeships and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a short overview of current government policy and context to the development of higher and degree apprenticeships and the engagement of higher education (HE) providers in delivery to achieve the ambition of three million apprenticeship starts by 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

Opinion piece contextualising the UK Government’s approach to apprenticeship reforms and the role of HE and further education in the design and development and delivery of higher and degree apprenticeships.

Findings

The apprenticeship system is at a critical stage of development and HE providers need to embrace the opportunities and address the competitive challenges of apprenticeship delivery given the £2.5 billion per annum that will be raised by the apprenticeship levy and the threat to their existing and traditional HE provision.

Originality/value

Reflects the ambition and mission of the University Vocational Awards Council.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Adrian Anderson

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2022

Rebecca Jane Quew-Jones and Lisa Rowe

Educational policy instruments such as apprenticeship levy and forthcoming lifetime skills guarantee are creating unprecedented opportunities for rapid growth in a range…

Abstract

Purpose

Educational policy instruments such as apprenticeship levy and forthcoming lifetime skills guarantee are creating unprecedented opportunities for rapid growth in a range of work-based learning (WBL) programmes, requiring increasingly complex levels of collaboration between providers and employers. Apprenticeships require providers to assume responsibility in ensuring apprentices’ work-based managers and mentors (WBMMs) are equipped to provide effective support to individuals as they learn ‘on the job’. After six years of higher education institution (HEI) apprenticeship curriculum delivery, there is opportunity to examine existing WBMM practice to inform the design, content and delivery of a shared knowledge base via a practical interactive toolkit. By developing clearer understanding of WBMMs’ experiences, expectations and challenges, the study aims to reduce potential gaps in knowledge and skills and encourage more effective collaboration between employers and providers to better support apprentices as they progress through WBL programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses evolution of higher level and degree apprenticeships, explores guidance for WBMMs and investigates the influence of expectations and motivations of WBMMS. Theoretical and conceptual foundations relating to WBL programme delivery and WBMM role are analysed and discussed. Qualitative data drawn from semi-structured surveys are analysed thematically to investigate common patterns, clarify understanding and identify development areas to inform future university provider and employer practice.

Findings

The findings suggest a number of themes to improve apprentice management; further clarity of WBMMs role, greater involvement of WBMM’s for negotiated learning, unplanned experiences do add value and scope for richer mentoring dialogues. WBL value for WBMMs is broader than expected, incorporating apprentice performance and output improvements, and solving complex problems.

Research limitations/implications

The research is drawn from an established university with five years of experience. However, the context in which programmes are delivered significantly varies according to providers and employers. This means factors other than those highlighted in this paper may continue to emerge as the research in this field develops.

Practical implications

The practical implications from findings can be used to cultivate stronger collaboration, providing a foundation of knowledge intended to provoke further dialogue regarding content for an interactive toolkit. The findings signal the need for further resources, a review of the restrictions associated with levy funding for co-creation of a more effective national apprenticeship framework.

Originality/value

This paper builds on a limited body of research examining employers’ perspectives of apprenticeship management. Degree apprenticeships have attracted limited scholarly attention over six years since their inception (Bowman, 2022) resulting in a significant paucity of research that focuses upon employer role. This study addresses this void by exploring WBMMs experiences, requirements and expectations, revealing new insights for providers of WBL, employers and individuals employed as WBMMs.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2022

Innocent Chigozie Osuizugbo, Patricia Omega Kukoyi, Abiodun Olatunji Abisuga and Kabir Ibrahim

Human resource contributes significantly to the outcome of construction projects. In recent years, apprenticeship programs are being implemented to train young people to…

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource contributes significantly to the outcome of construction projects. In recent years, apprenticeship programs are being implemented to train young people to address shortage of skills workers and ageing workforce problem. This study aims to understand the factors influencing career decisions among apprentices in the construction sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was used to address the objectives of the study. Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted to gain insights into the reason why young people decide to participate in construction craftsperson apprenticeship in Nigeria.

Findings

The study reveals that “interest and passion”, “role model”, “macroeconomic environment and government policies”, “spirit of entrepreneurship”, “formal, informal and non-formal education” and “family socioeconomic status” are the factors influencing career decisions among construction craftspeople.

Originality/value

The study provides fresh insights that can be used to develop strategies for attracting and increasing the number of young people that sign up for construction craftspeople apprenticeships. The apprentice training programmes are essential for addressing labour shortage, which is one of the factors affecting the performance of construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Denise Baker and David Robertshaw

This paper reflects on changes to end-point assessment (EPA) brought about as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and considers how proposed future change will impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reflects on changes to end-point assessment (EPA) brought about as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and considers how proposed future change will impact on training providers and employers of health apprentices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an analysis of apprenticeship policy, the role of EPA and consideration of assessment strategies used in higher education and health professions. Implications for policy, training providers and clinical practice are proposed.

Findings

These changes will bring the completion of EPA closer to education providers and allow them to take a more direct role within the process. Education providers will need to be issued with clear guidance to ensure regulatory compliance. The pedagogical value of EPA is questioned.

Originality/value

Training providers and policymakers will need to review their processes and guidance appropriately. This paper provides a summary of salient points needing consideration.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Michaela Riggall, Jason Skues and Lisa Wise

The purpose of this paper is to explore the definition, prevalence, antecedents, consequences and coping behaviours associated with apprenticeship bullying in the building…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the definition, prevalence, antecedents, consequences and coping behaviours associated with apprenticeship bullying in the building and construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprises 13 participants aged between 22 and 27 (M=23.8, SD=1.26) who were all men who had completed their apprenticeship within the past five years. Participants completed an individual semi-structured interview in which several themes and sub-themes were identified.

Findings

Four characteristics (intention to harm, imbalance in power, repeated behaviours, target interpretation) and two types (personal, work-related) were identified by participants as fundamental to the definition of apprenticeship bullying. Being the target of bullying was found to be commonplace during an apprenticeship. Several antecedents were identified at the individual level (age, personality, physical appearance, work ethic, work performance) along with factors at the organisation level (culture and leadership style) that determined whether bullying would occur. The consequences of apprenticeship bullying included poor individual (personal and work-related) and organisational outcomes. Targets of apprenticeship bullying also tended to use avoidance coping.

Originality/value

This study has provided clarification on the characteristics and behaviours associated with apprenticeship bullying, as well as identified the antecedents and consequences of apprenticeship bullying from the perspective of past apprentices in the building and construction industry.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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