Search results

1 – 10 of 15
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Hong Kim Duong, Michael Schuldt and Giorgio Gotti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of investor sentiment on timely loss recognition by examining a sample of firms for the period 1988-2015.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of investor sentiment on timely loss recognition by examining a sample of firms for the period 1988-2015.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the accruals-based model of Ball and Shivakumar (2005) and a sentiment measure in their primary analysis. Supporting analyses include an extension of Simpson (2013) using an abnormal accruals analysis with subsamples of firms with bad news, the use of a Khan and Watts (2009) quarter firm-level measure of conservatism and an investigation of the monitoring role played by financial analysts.

Findings

The study finds that managers strategically report more losses in high sentiment periods than in low sentiment periods. This loss timing behavior results in an average 37.8 per cent increase in the acceleration of loss recognition. This study additionally finds a negative correlation between investor sentiment and abnormal accruals when managers are reporting bad news, and that a greater number of financial analysts following a firm curtails managers’ acceleration of loss recognition in high sentiment periods.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the corporate disclosure literature by showing that managers strategically recognize losses, and such behavior is more prevalent in high sentiment periods. Managers take advantage of prevailing investor sentiment to accelerate losses in high sentiment periods to mitigate market penalties from reporting bad news.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Michael Schuldt and Jose Vega

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between revenue-based earnings management in the periods immediately before and after firms’ initial public offerings…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between revenue-based earnings management in the periods immediately before and after firms’ initial public offerings (IPOs) and regulatory scrutiny by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) during review of IPO firms’ registration statements.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses conditional discretionary revenues (Stubben, 2010) as its measure of earnings management, and revenue recognition comments delivered by the SEC as its measure of regulatory scrutiny. The authors use ordinary least squares regression (OLS) models, as well as a supplemental count model, to assess the association between conditional discretionary revenues and revenue recognition comments delivered by the SEC.

Findings

This study finds evidence of a positive association between earnings management measures in the pre-IPO period and the number of revenue recognition comments received by those firms during the SEC’s review. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that greater numbers of comments are associated with declining earnings management measures in the post-IPO period. However, the evidence suggests that these associations apply only to income-decreasing earnings management.

Originality/value

This paper extends the IPO earnings management literature by using conditional discretionary revenues as the measure of earnings management, and contributes to a nascent research stream in the accounting literature by investigating the SEC’s comment letter process and its association with, and impact upon, earnings management in the IPO process.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Cheryl L. Linthicum, Andrew J. McLelland and Michael A. Schuldt

This study investigates the influence of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on the interpretation and application of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the influence of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on the interpretation and application of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) by examining a group of SEC-selected foreign private issuers filing 2005 annual reports in the USA and reporting using IFRS for the first time.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses hand-collected information from SEC comment letters to analyze IFRS topics and documents the ultimate resolution of each SEC comment (no change to filing, current change to filing or prospective change to future filing). The authors use descriptive statistical analyses, as well as a logistic regression model involving the resolution of each SEC comment, to examine the SEC’s influence on the interpretation of IFRS.

Findings

The study finds both higher comment totals, and higher numbers of required filing modifications, for those IFRS pronouncements which were identified as needing improvement during the 2006-2008 convergence efforts by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the US Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). Additionally, the study documents a decreasing likelihood of a filing modification when US generally accepted accounting principles (US GAAP) guidance is referenced in comment letter correspondence involving IFRS topics.

Originality/value

The study extends the IFRS literature and the SEC comment letter literature by focusing on the resolution of comments directed at IFRS disclosures, as well as exploring the factors which influence whether a comment ultimately requires a filing modification.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Kenneth J. Smith, David J. Emerson and Michael A. Schuldt

This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy of the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale 10 (CD-RISC 10) (Campbell-Sills and Stein, 2007) for use in public accounting settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy of the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale 10 (CD-RISC 10) (Campbell-Sills and Stein, 2007) for use in public accounting settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The analyses include an examination of possible demographic differences in overall score, the scale’s factor structure, the invariance of its factor structure across gender and age groups, the scale’s reliability and its convergent and divergent validity.

Findings

There are significant gender and age group difference in scores, but a common univariate factor structure for the scale. The authors further find that a two-factor solution provides a superior fit to the data compared to the single factor structure used in the most prior research. Spearman–Brown reliability coefficients, item-total correlations and coefficient alphas each support the reliability of the items loading on the scale for the full sample, as well as for each of the above-referenced demographic subsamples.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are acknowledged related to the use of self-report measures, absence of test-retest score comparisons and convergent and divergent assessments limited to the heterotrait–homomethod approach.

Practical implications

The CD-RISC 10 is an expedient resilience measure, as it can be completed and scored in just a few minutes. Human resource administrators at public accounting firms can use it as an initial screening measure to identify staff who might benefit from resilience training. The paper adds to the appreciation of what not to do in the face of crisis by the government and those in charge of large accounting organizations.

Social implications

The CD-RISC 10 can be used in research and clinical efforts to reduce voluntary turnover of audit staff and enhance the well-being of auditors in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence that the CD-RISC 10 is a valid and reliable measure for future assessments of auditor resilience levels.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Dennis M. Lopez, Michael A. Schuldt and Jose G. Vega

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between auditor industry specialization and accounting quality in the European Union (EU).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between auditor industry specialization and accounting quality in the European Union (EU).

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a difference-in-differences design and explores audit quality from different industry specialist perspectives and different accounting standard regimes. Specifically, this study examines accounting quality among audits performed by non-industry specialists, EU member country-level industry specialists (EUM-level), EU community-level industry specialists (EUC-level), as well as joint industry specialists.

Findings

This study finds evidence of an improvement in accounting quality among audits performed by non-industry specialists post-IFRS. There is also evidence of an improvement in accounting quality among audits performed by EUC-level industry specialists post-IFRS. In addition, accounting quality among audits performed by EUM-level industry specialists seems to be greater than that of audits performed by non-industry specialists in either the pre-IFRS period or the post-IFRS period. Overall, the mandatory adoption of IFRS in the EU appears to be associated with an improvement in accounting quality among some auditor groups.

Research limitations/implications

Industry specialization and accounting quality are not directly observable constructs; this study inevitably employs proxy measures for both. The findings of this study are location-specific and apply to mandatory IFRS adopters only.

Practical implications

This study informs regulators with respect to the importance of industry specialist auditors and financial reporting quality, particularly within the context of the EU. The findings suggest that industry specialists were a significant accounting quality determinant during the mandatory adoption of IFRS. The findings have implications for regulators in the EU and beyond.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate the impact of auditor specialization on accounting quality in the EU, particularly in connection with the adoption of IFRS.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Janine Pierce

Peace on Earth has often been elusive, with more times on Earth spent at war rather than peace. This paper examines the nature of peace with its antithesis of war, focussing on

Abstract

Peace on Earth has often been elusive, with more times on Earth spent at war rather than peace. This paper examines the nature of peace with its antithesis of war, focussing on the impact of war on the planet, which is not a primary consideration when war is waged. War leaves negative planetary legacies, which are of major concerns in times of population growth whilst living on a finite planet. Who should be responsible for planetary impact of war is considered, with some focus on government and other organisations. Collaborative strategies for caring for the planet through guidelines and level of departments of defence and national law-making organisations at national levels are discussed, as well as overviewing the focus and role of the United Nations and the associated Sustainability Goals. The paper concludes by suggesting that a more powerful way to influence us in our responsibilities to live peacefully, rather than a virtuous ‘should not’ approach, is the need to shift back to a moral positioning in our perspectives as humans being part of the ecosystem, so that we view ourselves as being at one with all life. In this perspective, if we incur harm to this planet, we are harming ourselves. Suggestions for living in a more peaceful way are drawn from indigenous wisdom and spiritual teachers, particularly the current Pope Francis.

Details

Educating for Ethical Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-253-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Gaelynn P. Wolf Bordonaro, Laura Cherry and Jessica Stallings

The relationship between learning and mental health, as well as a growing body of literature, underscores the need for art therapy in educational settings. This is particularly…

Abstract

The relationship between learning and mental health, as well as a growing body of literature, underscores the need for art therapy in educational settings. This is particularly true for learners with special needs. Shostak et al. (1985) affirmed that “for children with special needs, art therapy in a school setting can offer opportunities to work through obstacles that impede educational success” (p. 19). School art therapy facilitates improved social interaction, increased learning behaviors, appropriate affective development, and increased empathy and personal well-being. It can be adapted to meet the specific developmental needs of individual students and to parallel students’ developmental, learning, and behavioral objectives. This chapter introduces the reader to the history and basic constructs of art therapy as a psychoeducational therapeutic intervention in schools. Model programs are identified, as well as the role of the art therapist within the context of K-12 education settings. Additionally, examples of special populations who benefit from art therapy intervention within school systems are provided, along with considerations for school-wide art therapy.

Details

Interdisciplinary Connections to Special Education: Key Related Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-663-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2021

Michael Mehmet, Troy Heffernan, Jennifer Algie and Behnam Forouhandeh

The purpose of this paper is to examine how upstream social marketing can benefit from using social media commentary to identify cognitive biases. Using reactions to leading…

1059

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how upstream social marketing can benefit from using social media commentary to identify cognitive biases. Using reactions to leading media/news publications/articles related to climate and energy policy in Australia, this paper aims to understand underlying community cognitive biases and their reasonings.

Design/methodology/approach

Social listening was used to gather community commentary about climate and energy policy in Australia. This allowed the coding of natural language data to determine underlying cognitive biases inherent in the community. In all, 2,700 Facebook comments were collected from 27 news articles dated between January 2018 and March 2020 using exportcomments.com. Team coding was used to ensure consistency in interpretation.

Findings

Nine key cognitive bias were noted, including, pessimism, just-world, confirmation, optimum, curse of knowledge, Dunning–Kruger, self-serving, concision and converge biases. Additionally, the authors report on the interactive nature of these biases. Right-leaning audiences are perceived to be willfully uninformed and motivated by self-interest; centric audiences want solutions based on common-sense for the common good; and left-leaning supporters of progressive climate change policy are typically pessimistic about the future of climate and energy policy in Australia. Impacts of powerful media organization shaping biases are also explored.

Research limitations/implications

Through a greater understanding of the types of cognitive biases, policy-makers are able to better design and execute influential upstream social marketing campaigns.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates that observing cognitive biases through social listening can assist upstream social marketing understand community biases and underlying reasonings towards climate and energy policy.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Reinaldo Belickas Manzini and Luiz Carlos Di Serio

This paper offers an approach for outlining the main dimensions surrounding clusters in three areas of knowledge: economic geography, strategic management and operations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers an approach for outlining the main dimensions surrounding clusters in three areas of knowledge: economic geography, strategic management and operations management, the first being considered its natural field of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The work was developed using the citation analysis technique as applied to a database of 627 articles and 22,980 citations, taken from 15 important journals in the areas selected.

Findings

The results proved that the theoretical and conceptual bases are unique to each of the areas studied and that they have few topics in common between them. They are complementary, however, and this facilitates their reconciliation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample base, despite considering fairly influential periodicals in the areas of knowledge selected, can be considered to be a limitation.

Originality/value

Common themes and different areas of knowledge surrounding the cluster concept were identified; despite being considered “common”, a more detailed examination of their content reveals very different, but certainly complementary emphases, which makes it possible to reconcile the areas of knowledge.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Louis J. Grabowski and Lars Mathiassen

Sound real estate decisions are both financially and strategically essential to corporate success. Given their importance, this paper aims to illustrate how the actor network…

2010

Abstract

Purpose

Sound real estate decisions are both financially and strategically essential to corporate success. Given their importance, this paper aims to illustrate how the actor network theory (ANT) can be a valuable alternate lens to bounded rational and political perspectives in providing insights into corporate real estate decision‐making processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory investigation uses a case study approach to retroactively examine the real estate decision‐making process over five to seven years in four organizations ranging in size from four to 125 employees. The study uses multiple data sources including 25 in‐depth interviews, site visits, archival data, websites, documents, and email correspondence.

Findings

Using the constructs of ANT, the findings reveal how real estate decision making involves iterative but identifiable phases through which heterogeneous actors seek to converge diverse interests and where artifacts affect behaviors and outcomes as much as or sometimes more than their human creators.

Research limitations/implications

Given the case study method, this research lacks generalizability. Researchers are encouraged to test the findings in different contexts.

Practical implications

The ANT perspective helps managers faced with real estate decisions to appreciate the relevant matrix of need, power, and interests; recognize and seek to control the power of artifacts; and, view real estate decision making not as simply making a choice among logical alternatives, but as orchestrating a long, complex process.

Originality/value

This investigation compares the perspectives of ANT to the classical bounded rational and political lenses in examining corporate real estate decision making; demonstrates ANT's value in providing additional insights; and, discusses its implications for understanding and managing these complex processes.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15