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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Stephanie E. Pitts and Karen Burland

This article seeks to understand how audience members at a live jazz event react to one another, to the listening venue, and to the performance. It considers the extent to…

1219

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to understand how audience members at a live jazz event react to one another, to the listening venue, and to the performance. It considers the extent to which being an audience member is a social experience, as well as a personal and musical one, and investigates the distinctive qualities of listening to live jazz in a range of venues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on evidence from nearly 800 jazz listeners, surveyed at the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival and in The Spin jazz club, Oxford. Questionnaires, diaries and interviews were used to understand the experiences of listening for a wide range of audience members, and were analysed using NVivo.

Findings

The findings illustrate how listening to live jazz has a strongly social element, whereby listeners derive pleasure from attending with others or meeting like‐minded enthusiasts in the audience, and welcome opportunities for conversation and relaxation within venues that help to facilitate this. Within this social context, live listening is for some audience members an intense, sometimes draining experience; while for others it offers a source of relaxation and absorption, through the opportunity to focus on good playing and preferred repertoire. Live listening is therefore both an individual and a social act, with unpredictable risks and pleasures attached to both elements, and varying between listeners, venues and occasions.

Research limitations/implications

There is potential for this research to be replicated in a wider range of jazz venues, and for these findings to be compared with audiences of other music genres, particularly pop and classical, where differences in expectations and behaviour will be evident.

Practical implications

The authors demonstrate how existing audience members are a vast source of knowledge about how a live jazz gig works, and how the appeal of such events could be nurtured amongst potential new audiences. They show the value of qualitative investigations of audience experience, and of the process of research and reflection in itself can be a source of audience development and engagement.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to the literature on audience engagement, both through the substantial sample size and through the consideration of individual and social experiences of listening. It will have value to researchers in music psychology, arts marketing and related disciplines, as well as being a useful source of information and strategy for arts promoters.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Arne Westermann and Jörg Forthmann

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extend an automated, algorithm-based analysis of online conversations of stakeholders in social media and other…

1045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extend an automated, algorithm-based analysis of online conversations of stakeholders in social media and other Internet media can be used for reputation management.

Design/methodology/approach

Examination of the reputation of the 5,000 companies with the largest number of employees in Germany based on communication with these companies in 350m online sources on the German-speaking Internet within one year. The method is grounded on an adapted reputation model based on Fombrun.

Findings

The central result of the study is the identification of the ideal balance between the different dimensions leading to the best overall reputation. The resulting correlation matrix with the respective correlation coefficients (according to Pearson) thus forms the basis for the optimal reputation architecture.

Research limitations/implications

The discovered “optimal reputation architecture” refers to a German context. Future studies should investigate in how far the adapted model and the “optimal reputation architecture” also work for other cultures. It can be assumed that there may be differences as different dimensions, for example, sustainability, may have a different importance in other cultural contexts. Apart from the question if the “optimal reputation architecture” is also valid for other cultural contexts, the concept has to be validated for German companies as well as it is just based on the two described studies.

Practical implications

The method used shows that social listening can deliver valuable results for research in the field of reputation management as it expands the possibilities to investigate reputation on a large scale. The approach shows in how far scientific research can be expanded beyond classic content analysis as the number of items which can be analysed exceeds that of classic analytical approaches by far. Explicit and implicit experiences, which are the drivers of reputation, can be systematically recorded and analysed using social listening, thus delivering valuable insights in how stakeholders perceive the performance of a company in different dimensions.

Social implications

Measuring the reputation on the basis of social listening is very important for practical applications in companies, because the data is available digitally and can deliver up-to-date reputation values almost in real time – so that the communication can be aligned very quickly with current events. This makes it easier to implement and control the interaction between companies and their environment in the digital space.

Originality/value

The classic approach in reputation management is traditional market research. It is relatively expensive and takes a relatively long time to produce results. Reputation management based on social listening digitises reputation measurement, lowers costs and delivers results in a very timely manner. It might be the future of reputation measurement. This is relevant not only for practical purposes but also for scientific approaches.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2021

Elisa Tattersall Wallin

This article explores, identifies and conceptualises everyday audiobook reading practices amongst young adults.

1326

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores, identifies and conceptualises everyday audiobook reading practices amongst young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten Swedish audiobook users aged 18–19. The material was analysed using qualitative content analysis and focused on their audiobook use during an average weekday, as this was the time that they listened the most. The theoretical framework consists of theories on practice, time and everyday routine.

Findings

Five timespaces emerged when audiobook practices were most prevalent: morning routines, commuting routines, school routines, after school routines and bedtime routines. Within these timespaces, several practices could be identified and conceptualised. Three mobile practices were commute listening, exercise listening and chore listening while more stationary practices were homework listening, schoolwork listening and leisure listening. An unexpected finding was how audiobooks routinely were used to aid respondents’ wellbeing. This wellbeing listening was used to alleviate stress, loneliness and help listeners relax or fall asleep. Furthermore, respondents switch between Music, Audiobooks and Podcasts, which is conceptualised as MAP-switching.

Originality/value

There is a scarcity of research on audiobook use, and this paper contributes with new knowledge on audiobook reading practices, how audiobooks fit into everyday routine and provides concepts to aid further research on audiobook practices.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2021

Michael Mehmet, Troy Heffernan, Jennifer Algie and Behnam Forouhandeh

The purpose of this paper is to examine how upstream social marketing can benefit from using social media commentary to identify cognitive biases. Using reactions to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how upstream social marketing can benefit from using social media commentary to identify cognitive biases. Using reactions to leading media/news publications/articles related to climate and energy policy in Australia, this paper aims to understand underlying community cognitive biases and their reasonings.

Design/methodology/approach

Social listening was used to gather community commentary about climate and energy policy in Australia. This allowed the coding of natural language data to determine underlying cognitive biases inherent in the community. In all, 2,700 Facebook comments were collected from 27 news articles dated between January 2018 and March 2020 using exportcomments.com. Team coding was used to ensure consistency in interpretation.

Findings

Nine key cognitive bias were noted, including, pessimism, just-world, confirmation, optimum, curse of knowledge, Dunning–Kruger, self-serving, concision and converge biases. Additionally, the authors report on the interactive nature of these biases. Right-leaning audiences are perceived to be willfully uninformed and motivated by self-interest; centric audiences want solutions based on common-sense for the common good; and left-leaning supporters of progressive climate change policy are typically pessimistic about the future of climate and energy policy in Australia. Impacts of powerful media organization shaping biases are also explored.

Research limitations/implications

Through a greater understanding of the types of cognitive biases, policy-makers are able to better design and execute influential upstream social marketing campaigns.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates that observing cognitive biases through social listening can assist upstream social marketing understand community biases and underlying reasonings towards climate and energy policy.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Tracy Tuten and Victor Perotti

The purpose of this study is to illustrate the influence of media coverage and sentiment about brands on user-generated content amplification and opinions expressed in…

6288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to illustrate the influence of media coverage and sentiment about brands on user-generated content amplification and opinions expressed in social media.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a mixed-method approach, using a brand situation as a case example, including sentiment analysis of social media conversations and sentiment analysis of media coverage. This study tracks the diffusion of a false claim about the brand via online media coverage, subsequent spreading of the false claim via social media and the resulting impact on sentiment toward the brand.

Findings

The findings illustrate the influence of digital mass communication sources on the subsequent spread of information about a brand via social media channels and the impact of the social spread of false claims on brand sentiment. This study illustrates the value of social media listening and sentiment analysis for brands as an ongoing business practice.

Research limitations/implications

While it has long been known that media coverage is in part subsequently diffused through individual sharing, this study reveals the potential for media sentiment to influence sentiment toward a brand. It also illustrates the potential harm brands face when false information is spread via media coverage and subsequently through social media posts and conversations. How brands can most effectively correct false brand beliefs and recover from negative sentiment related to false claims is an area for future research.

Practical implications

This study suggests that brands are wise to use sentiment analysis as part of their evaluation of earned media coverage from news organizations and to use social listening as an alert system and sentiment analysis to assess impact on attitudes toward the brand. These steps should become part of a brand’s social media management process.

Social implications

Media are presumed to be impartial reporters of news and information. However, this study illustrated that the sentiment expressed in media coverage about a brand can be measured and diffused beyond the publications’ initial reach via social media. Advertising positioned as news must be labeled as “advertorial” to ensure that those exposed to the message understand that the message is not impartial. News organizations may inadvertently publish false claims and relay information with sentiment that is then carried via social media along with the information itself. Negative information about a brand may be more sensational and, thus, prone to social sharing, no matter how well the findings are researched or sourced.

Originality/value

The value of the study is its illustration of how false information and media sentiment spread via social media can ultimately affect consumer sentiment and attitude toward the brand. This study also explains the research process for social scraping and sentiment analysis.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Barbara Barney-McNamara, James Peltier, Pavan Rao Chennamaneni and Keith Eric Niedermeier

The purpose of this paper is to provide a detail review of the social selling literature and to offer future research needs. Social selling has gained the attention of…

1383

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a detail review of the social selling literature and to offer future research needs. Social selling has gained the attention of sales researchers. Rather than merely a new tool, social selling redefines the traditional sales process. However, the literature is spread across topics of social media and sales, social customer relationship management, salesforce automation and social selling, and does not provide an agreed-upon definition or tested construct for implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a comprehensive literature review of social selling and all related terminology.

Findings

The authors propose a social selling framework that includes personal branding, information exchange, networking and social listening to define and outline the construct while suggesting the antecedents and outcomes to guide future research. Findings from a literature review include outlining key theories used in social selling research.

Originality/value

This review offers a conceptual framework of social selling, including both antecedents and outcomes, to inform future research and guide academics and practitioners.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Lyndon Jones

For managers there are many courses available dealing with effective reading, effective report writing, effective speaking. Yet comparatively few managers receive training…

1560

Abstract

For managers there are many courses available dealing with effective reading, effective report writing, effective speaking. Yet comparatively few managers receive training in effective listening, despite the upsurge in interest in the subject in recent years. This is surprising in view of the fact that a great deal of managerial time is spent in listening situations, and many managers are ineffective listeners.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Charles Scott Rader, Zahed Subhan, Clinton D. Lanier, Roger Brooksbank, Sandra Yankah and Kristin Spears

The purpose of this paper is to assess the state of the art in social media and pharmaceutical marketing through empirical analysis of online consumer conversations…

3365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the state of the art in social media and pharmaceutical marketing through empirical analysis of online consumer conversations. Proliferation of social media has significantly changed traditional one-way, marketing-controlled communications. Balance of power has shifted to consumers, who use social networking sites, blogs and forums to obtain extensive brand and product information, often from each other. This prompts companies towards more intimate, transparent and constant two-way consumer engagement. Pharmaceutical marketing and direct to consumer advertising (DTCA) are not immune to this pervasive, disruptive cultural/technological phenomenon, which poses particular challenges given regulatory, legal and ethical constraints on their marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses “netnographic” data collection of online conversations occurring in social media and develops an explanatory framework using grounded theory analytical methods.

Findings

This research shows that significantly impactful and pervasive bonding among consumers, bloggers and unofficial “experts” about pharmaceutical offerings is widespread, and occurs regardless (and perhaps in spite of) pharmaceutical companies’ involvement.

Originality/value

Considering the structure and nature of online consumer bonding, a way forward is proposed for pharmaceutical companies to implement social media strategies as part of their pharmaceutical marketing and DTCA efforts through an intermediary and interactive online presence arising from disease and health care education.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Kathy R. Fitzpatrick and Paula L. Weissman

The aim of this study was to understand how public relations leaders view and use social media analytics (SMA) and the impact of SMA on the public relations function.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to understand how public relations leaders view and use social media analytics (SMA) and the impact of SMA on the public relations function.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved in-depth interviews with chief communication officers (CCOs) from leading multinational corporate brands.

Findings

The findings revealed that although CCOs perceive social media analytics as strategically important to the advancement of public relations, the use of social media data is slowed by challenges associated with building SMA capacity.

Theoretical and practical implications

The research extends public relations theory on public relations as a strategic management function and provides practical insights for building SMA capabilities.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to provide empirical evidence of how companies are using social media analytics to enhance public relations efforts.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Alma Whiteley

To report on an exploratory study on unwritten rules carried out in Australia, place this study in the context of the historical development of thought on rules and…

1438

Abstract

Purpose

To report on an exploratory study on unwritten rules carried out in Australia, place this study in the context of the historical development of thought on rules and discuss implications for management learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has three parts. The first part reviews the theoretical scholarly writings on rules as social structures from the early sociology of the nineteenth century to the organizational theory of the present day. Theories of structural functionalism and institutionalism are acknowledged as historical influences on rules and the assumptions likely to be made by managers about compliance and implementation. In the second part, the research is described in which staff members from five organizations were invited to technology‐supported focus groups. The data collection was supported by group support systems technology, which allowed anonymous inputs. Staff were asked, in various ways, about both official rules and unwritten rules. These included the use of scenarios, reported here. In the third part, the findings are discussed and three implications for management learning are suggested.

Findings

The research produced evidence that rules exist, are acted upon and require a view of the rule‐implementer as complex and holistic. The findings supported Giddens' theory of structuration which suggests that the individual rule taker draws on rules and also personal sensibility when involved in social encounters.

Originality/value

This paper provides contemporary data on rules as perceived practice which is presented within the context of the historical development of relevant management theory. Attention is drawn to three implications for management learning, which are: what rules mean, assumptions of managers, and deep listening as social responsibility. The future research agenda should be of value to those considering a practical contribution to this original field of institutional inquiry.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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