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Article

Vanesa Barrales-Molina, Francisco Javier Llorens Montes and Leopoldo J Gutierrez-Gutierrez

The purpose of this paper is to explain the outcomes and role of dynamic capabilities (DCs). To explain the outcomes, the authors study the relationship between new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the outcomes and role of dynamic capabilities (DCs). To explain the outcomes, the authors study the relationship between new product development (NPD) (an example of DCs) and metaflexibility. To explain the role of DCs, the authors study how human resources and operating routines moderate the role of DCs in achieving adaptation in the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from 200 managers of Spanish firms, the authors apply regression analysis to test the moderating role of human resources and operating routines in the relationship between NPD and metaflexibility.

Findings

The results demonstrate that highly qualified and committed workers enhance the effectiveness of NPD, while high frequency in repetition of operating routines significantly damages such effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to analysing a unique DC (NPD), but future research could explore contributions on other consolidated DCs (e.g. alliance management capability) and compare results. Also, the database on managerial perceptions rather than objective measures.

Practical implications

Managers who must address environmental changes should connect generation of DCs to complementary functional strategies, especially human resources strategy.

Originality/value

This paper suggests additional outcomes derived from DCs, such as metaflexibility. It attempts to understand the complex process by which DCs interact to modify operating routines in order to respond to environmental changes.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Antonio J. Verdú‐Jover, José‐María Gómez‐Gras and Francisco J. Lloréns‐Montes

This paper aims to propose a model to assess managerial flexibility and its determinants.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a model to assess managerial flexibility and its determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform a literature review to identify the main dimensions of managerial flexibility. Flexibility as a firm capability to co‐align the firm and the business environment permanently is deeply related to the notion of fit. The proposed model integrates different approaches to fit. Based on an empirical, transnational study, the research proposes a model for managerial flexibility.

Findings

Three types of flexibility are measured: managerial flexibility, financial flexibility and metaflexibility. Financial flexibility and metaflexibility determine the degree of managerial flexibility, which in turn has positive implications for performance.

Research limitations/implications

The variables included in the model are not exhaustive. The concept of fit implies a static perspective of flexibility.

Practical implications

The results are useful both for researchers and for practitioners. Researchers can benefit from a review of managerial flexibility and a methodology that combines different approaches to fit: matching, covariation and profile deviation. Practitioners can learn that managerial flexibility, articulated in some managerial practices, has positive effects on performance when they are in line with the requirements of the environment. In order to activate these practices, firms should maintain a commitment to learning capabilities and financial resources.

Originality/value

Three contributions are important for research. First, the paper proposes a model for explaining the nature of managerial flexibility. Second, it shows that flexibility and fit are interrelated concepts and that fit improves the measurability of flexibility. Third, managerial flexibility has positive implications for firm performance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

B Gould

Contends organizations need some possibilities to enable change to survive or exploit shifts and terms of their environments. Highlights, in a panel, the flexibility main…

Abstract

Contends organizations need some possibilities to enable change to survive or exploit shifts and terms of their environments. Highlights, in a panel, the flexibility main points for organizations and uses a Table and Figures for extra explanatory information. States there are three basic flexibilities produced by dynamic management capabilities: organizational design; turbulence; and metaflexibility. Spotlights, in another panel, flexibility changes at KLM Cargo. Notes many organizations combine several of the above methods of pursuing change and continuity ‐ but they are not mutually exclusive.

Details

The Antidote, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-8483

Keywords

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Article

Araceli Rojo, Javier Llorens-Montes and Maria Nieves Perez-Arostegui

The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether supply chain (SC) ambidexterity improves supply chain flexibility (SCF) and its impact on SC competence and firm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether supply chain (SC) ambidexterity improves supply chain flexibility (SCF) and its impact on SC competence and firm performance. A new measurement instrument for SCF is proposed that takes into account the demands of the environment: SCF fit.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed to examine the relationships proposed. The hypotheses are tested with data from 302 manufacturing firms using a structural equations model methodology.

Findings

The results show that SC ambidexterity helps to achieve the optimal level of SCF and that supply chain management (SCM) is important to firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper makes three contributions to the SCM literature: first, it develops the conceptual definition of SC ambidexterity and studies its effects at the SC level; second, it develops a new instrument to measure SCF known as SCF fit; third, it studies both the impact of SCF fit on SC competence and the importance of SC in firm performance.

Practical implications

This paper develops a measurement instrument that permits managers to diagnose the level of SCF and the correspondence/gap between current and optimal levels and to establish comparisons between different SC. It also indicates the importance of SCM for firm performance and the need to consider the SC as a whole.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to analyze ambidexterity in an organizational network like the SC. It shows that exploitation practices do not jeopardize SCF as long as they are accompanied by exploration practices. That is, high levels of exploration and exploitation are compatible in the SC and lead to the optimal level of SCF.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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