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Article

Christoph Flöthmann, Kai Hoberg and Britta Gammelgaard

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of supply chain management (SCM) competencies by splitting them into individual and organizational components and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of supply chain management (SCM) competencies by splitting them into individual and organizational components and measuring their impact on SCM performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothesized relationships are tested using structural equation modeling and bootstrapping mediation analysis based on a multi-national survey with 273 managers while drawing on the theory of knowledge management and literature streams of individual competencies in the fields of SCM and human resource management (HRM), respectively.

Findings

The analysis reveals that individual SCM competencies and organizational SCM knowledge positively influence SCM performance to a similar magnitude. Moreover, organizational learning enhances individual competencies and organizational knowledge significantly and equally while corporate training programs fall surprisingly short of expectations. The disentanglement of SCM competencies renders HRM’s contribution to SCM visible by revealing the impact of HRM and learning practices on competencies, knowledge, and performance.

Research limitations/implications

To validate the findings, future research could apply different research methods such as case studies and focus on more countries to reduce potential methodological and regional biases.

Practical implications

The results suggest that corporate training programs need further development. Organizational learning’s strong direct and indirect effects have two main implications: first, it should serve as motivation for organizations to constantly improve their learning capabilities. Second, these only tap its true potential for enhancing SCM performance if they first elevate individual competencies and organizational knowledge.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to distinguish between individual competencies and organizational knowledge on finely nuanced levels. While the organizational knowledge level effect on performance has been studied before, this paper extends this effect to also hold true for the individual level.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Alexander Ellinger, Hyunju Shin, William Magnus Northington, Frank G. Adams, Debra Hofman and Kevin O'Marah

The relationship between supply chain management (SCM) competency and firm performance is not well established empirically. This is largely because proven metrics for…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between supply chain management (SCM) competency and firm performance is not well established empirically. This is largely because proven metrics for quantifying the effects of SCM are scarce. Drawing on the strategic managerial concept of supply chain orientation as a source of competitive advantage, this paper aims to apply three independent sources of secondary data to examine the influence of SCM competency on two important firm performance metrics: customer satisfaction and shareholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

SCM competency is assessed with data from the expert opinion element of Gartner Supply Chain Group's (formerly AMR Research) supply chain top 25 rankings; the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) database and the recently developed Economic Value Added (EVA) Momentum financial metric are utilized as outcome measures.

Findings

Firms recognized by peers and experts for superior SCM competency exhibit higher levels of customer satisfaction and shareholder value than their respective industry averages.

Research limitations/implications

Further evidence is required to prove causality does exist between these variables. Limitations associated with the use of secondary data restricted the number of top performer firms available for this analysis. Nevertheless, the strong correlations found between SCM competency and two critical firm performance metrics may help senior managers and managers from other functional areas to better understand potential advantages associated with developing greater SCM competency.

Practical implications

The assessment of two metrics that differentiate top SCM performers from their industry competitors may also help SCM professionals to better convey the impact of SCM competency to non‐supply chain managers and external participants in the supply chain whose support and cooperation are critical to the success of process improvement initiatives.

Originality/value

In addition to the study findings, blending qualitative expert opinion, formal customer satisfaction and quantitative financial performance secondary data represents a relatively novel and informative method that responds to contentions that different approaches should be employed to develop a more holistic understanding of SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

Domingos Fernandes Campos, José Tarcísio de Andrade Lima Jr, Anielson Barbosa da Silva and António Jorge Fernandes

The purpose of this paper is to analyse professionals’ competencies in supply chain management (SCM) in the mid-sized supermarket sector in Brazil as a way of broadening…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse professionals’ competencies in supply chain management (SCM) in the mid-sized supermarket sector in Brazil as a way of broadening the understanding of the importance and the use of competencies in business development.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was conducted with 60 managers from 34 companies in the mid-sized supermarket sector in the metropolitan region of Natal, Brazil. The managers evaluated the importance and use of a set of 24 general and specific competencies related to SCM. The gaps between importance and use were identified and analysed.

Findings

The results showed that the level of use was below the level of importance for all competencies, and the general competencies somehow received more attention than specific competencies in the development and execution of SCM activities. Moreover, the overall average of the gaps between levels of use and importance calculated for the general competencies was less than the general average of the gaps calculated for the specific skills.

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out with a sample of mid-sized supermarkets in a particular region. Therefore, it is recommended that the research be extended to other contexts and supermarket companies of other sizes.

Practical implications

The calculated gaps between managers’ expectations or attributed importance and the perceived levels of competence use in supermarket organisations revealed important lines of action for correcting the course in human resources policy.

Originality/value

The present paper elaborated on an opportunities matrix, gaps × importance, showing how managers can set priorities to fill competence gaps and improve the companies’ human resources. Besides, it compares levels of importance and uses for two groups of competencies, general and specific related to SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

Christoph Flöthmann, Kai Hoberg and Andreas Wieland

This study aims to enhance the understanding of competency requirements of supply chain planners and analysts (SCP&As) and identify different personal preferences of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enhance the understanding of competency requirements of supply chain planners and analysts (SCP&As) and identify different personal preferences of hiring managers toward job candidates’ competency profiles.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 243 supply chain managers with hiring experience participated in an adaptive choice-based conjoint experiment to uncover the relative importance of six competency attributes, namely, analytical and problem-solving ability, interpersonal skills, general management skills, computer/IT skills, supply chain management (SCM) knowledge and industry experience.

Findings

SCM knowledge and analytical and problem-solving ability were identified as the most important competencies and were considered three times more important than general management skills. Based on convergent cluster and ensemble analysis, two types of hiring managers were identified. The first group is characterized by a pronounced preference for job candidates with extensive SCM knowledge. In contrast, the second group’s members prefer candidates with a more balanced competency profile.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings help companies to facilitate a better person–job fit, a key determinant of employee performance and job satisfaction.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

Matthew H. Sauber, Hugh B. McSurely and V.M. Rao Tummala

This paper aims to show the process of designing and measuring learning competencies in program development.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show the process of designing and measuring learning competencies in program development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes cross‐sectoral comparisons to draw on programmatic and pedagogical strategies, more commonly utilized in vocational education, and transfer the application of these strategies into curriculum development in higher education. Using a case study approach, the paper details the process of identifying and measuring learning competencies in developing specialization and graduate certificate program in supply chain management.

Findings

The development of competencies used an interdisciplinary framework to infuse interaction among stakeholders – faculty, students, and practitioners. The process focused on competencies at the program level as opposed to certain course or class level. The result produced more realistic competencies addressing student learning. The competency approach presented challenges in collecting and analyzing assessment data and opportunities to continuously improve the program. Data on student self‐assessment of learning competency as well as course work (exercises and assignments) were collected, analyzed, and reviewed. They resulted in changes in textbooks, class exercises and assignments, and faculty lectures.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the virtues of embedding learning competency development and measurement in the design of educational programs. This is an issue of ongoing relevance to education in general, and of growing relevance to higher education in particular. As psychometric methodology advances, quality assurance and continuous improvement in education place greater emphasis on learning outcomes. As such, the identification and measurement of competencies become issues of increasing importance in educational systems around the world.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article

Luoyi Sun and Guang Song

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it describes the general characteristics of studies on logistics and supply chain education (L&SCE). Second, it classifies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it describes the general characteristics of studies on logistics and supply chain education (L&SCE). Second, it classifies identified papers on the basis of their main research methods and issues. Finally, it proposes some meaningful directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Seventy-three papers published since 2000 in international peer-reviewed journals were reviewed using a systematic review methodology. The collected papers were analyzed and classified on the basis of research methods and issues.

Findings

It was found that most papers on L&SCE were published in journals in the logistics and supply chain management field and were conducted by either a single or mixed-method approach. The survey-based approach was the most preferred method. The contribution of this study is twofold. First, the identification of the five competencies and 49 skills required of logistics and supply chain talents was performed along with the analysis of the 42 courses and the teaching methods. Second, this study revealed some important aspects that have received inadequate attention in the literature and proposed potential research directions.

Originality/value

This paper provides academics and practitioners alike with a guide to extant literature. The proposed framework of the competencies and skills required of talents could be a guide to develop competence in both students and employees. The summary of the curriculum and the matrix of relationships between the relevant courses and competencies can be used by educators to improve L&SCE. Finally, the proposed research directions are meaningful for academics.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Article

John Mangan and Martin Christopher

With the growing acceptance of logistics and supply chain management (SCM) as critical business concerns, there is an emerging realisation that more investment is needed…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growing acceptance of logistics and supply chain management (SCM) as critical business concerns, there is an emerging realisation that more investment is needed to develop appropriate managerial skills and competencies for supply chain managers. This paper explores the challenges for management development that arise as organisations seek to bridge the gap between current capabilities and those required for future success.

Design/methodology/approach

Three constituencies were of interest to our research: providers of education and training, students and participants on programmes, and corporates who purchase programmes. A triangulated research approach was employed in order to capture the views of each of these constituencies. This comprised a focus group, interviews and surveys, and a case study of logistics/SCM development at one of the world's leading pharmaceutical companies.

Findings

The key knowledge areas and competencies/skills required by logistics and supply chain managers are identified. Preferred teaching approaches are also identified, as are optimum approaches for career development. The subtle yet significant differences that exist among the three constituencies in the various areas and approaches are highlighted. The results thus constitute a tentative skills profile for the logistics and supply chain manager of the future.

Originality/value

The research provides a multi‐stakeholder insight, set in the context of the key business transformations which are shaping logistics and SCM practice, into the development of the supply chain manager of the future. Practical recommendations emerge for all stakeholders in logistics/SCM development practice. Recommendations for further research are also made, particularly for (from a methodological perspective) more case study research, and (from a research focus perspective) research into learning styles and also linking individual, organisational and supply chain learning.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Lara Bartocci Liboni, Luciana Oranges Cezarino, Charbel José Chiappetta Jabbour, Bruno Garcia Oliveira and Nelson Oliveira Stefanelli

The purpose of this paper is to address the potential impacts of Industry 4.0 on human resource management (HRM) – with a particular focus on employment, job profile and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the potential impacts of Industry 4.0 on human resource management (HRM) – with a particular focus on employment, job profile and qualification and skill requirements in the workforce – which can have implications for supply chain management (SCM). Consequently, exploratory relationships among Industry 4.0, HRM and SCM are presented based on a systematic review.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore Industry 4.0 literature and its impact on employment, the authors used a systematic literature review to identify, classify and analyze current knowledge, flagging trends and proposing recommendations for future research in this area. Using the Web of Science database, the authors utilized co-citation software to visualize the networks which emerged from recurrent terms and which were then used to develop the categories of analysis.

Findings

The authors can affirm that the literature in this field is in a transition process, from the early studies of German academics to the current development of new impacts worldwide. Industry 4.0 is the central theme of the literature analyzed and is accomplished through the development of employment, qualifications, skills and learning frameworks. The results reveal that most papers are conceptual, with quantitative studies still lacking. Developed countries have a leading role in terms of research production, while Latin America and Asia are far behind. Clustering reveals four dominant themes (educational changes, employment scenario, work infrastructure resources and work meaning and proposal). The first refers to labor changes around working conditions, the work environment and new skills which are required. The second main theme concerns the potentially unstable shift in the labor market has toward a high-level context. The third is about the technical interface of humans and machines, and finally, the fourth understands the German industry as a starting point for global industrial improvements and work proposal changes. Furthermore, socio-technical systems cover the implications of HRM for SCM in three different dimensions: qualification and education (human competences), collaboration and integration of SCM (organizational competences) and data and information management (technical competences).

Research limitations/implications

An original research agenda for further development of the topic. Additionally, the implications of the findings for SCM practitioners are presented.

Practical implications

SCM managers can benefit from the results of this paper by developing adjusted polices for organizational and human aspects. Specially about training programs to improve technology skills and education programs for cyber-human new plataforms.

Originality/value

So far, Industry 4.0, HRM-related topics and implications for SCM have generally been considered separately. This paper elucidates the few important studies on the impacts of Industry 4.0 on human-related topics, such as the labor market, building a research framework using the main contributions highlighted in the literature. An original research agenda is presented, as well as potential implications for SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

Paul D. Larson

The purpose of this paper is to report results of a survey in support of re‐designing the Purchasing Management Association of Canada (PMAC) professional accreditation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report results of a survey in support of re‐designing the Purchasing Management Association of Canada (PMAC) professional accreditation program, the Certified Professional Purchaser (CPP).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed, embedded in e‐mail messages via hyperlink, and transmitted to the PMAC membership. The questionnaire included 54 topics, tools and techniques for supply chain management (SCM). Over 2,000 PMAC members commented on CPP program design, by returning the questionnaire electronically. Data analysis culminated with a principal components analysis of the 54 items, from which seven distinct components emerged.

Findings

The paper finds that PMAC members lack a common view of SCM. While 63 percent have adopted a broad SCM perspective; 37 percent have a more narrow perspective. However, the most important topics for supply chain professionals are robust across the perspectives. These topics pertain to general managerial skills (e.g. communication, leadership and relationship building); rather than specific functional or analytical tools and techniques.

Research limitations/implications

While the current study focuses exclusively on Canadian supply chain professionals, it would be very interesting and worthwhile to expand this research to other geographic locations.

Practical implications

A renewed CPP program, taken out of the somewhat narrow and tactically‐oriented purchasing area – and into the broader and more strategic SCM space, seems to be in order. The survey provides valuable information to support design and development of this new program.

Originality/value

Based on electronic survey returns from more than 2,000 supply chain professionals, insights are gained into various perspectives on SCM, along with important knowledge (topics, tools and techniques) for effective SCM.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article

Trish Gibson, Donald Kerr and Ron Fisher

There is an acknowledged need to advance the supply chain management (SCM) learning agenda, with an emphasis on integration. This paper discuss an Australian…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an acknowledged need to advance the supply chain management (SCM) learning agenda, with an emphasis on integration. This paper discuss an Australian university–industry collaboration aimed at accelerating SCM learning and offers some insight into models for building a forward-looking SCM.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is an exploratory case study of the industry–university collaboration, using grounded theory procedures. The primary data involved 25 interviews with key participants from the university and industry partners, and from the first cohort of students in the undergraduate program developed within the collaboration.

Findings

A theoretical framework for accelerating SCM learning was developed from the case study data; it comprises six constructs that influence, at strategic and operational levels, the acceleration of SCM learning. Four cross-construct concepts from the framework that form the cornerstones of accelerated learning are discussed in some detail.

Research limitations/implications

The framework facilitates an examination of successes and shortfalls in the case study collaboration and generates a deeper understanding of critical elements for progressing the SCM learning agenda, and expanding SCM education. As with all qualitative research, the results may not be generalisable; testing the relevance and usefulness of the framework with the field will be an important next step.

Practical implications

As the framework identifies conditions, characteristics and capacities of organisations and individuals that support the acceleration of SCM learning, it can provide assistance in designing future university–industry collaborations for advancing SCM learning.

Originality/value

The framework identifies critical success factors for alliances and partnerships aimed at accelerating learning in an emerging body of knowledge such as SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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