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1 – 10 of 555
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Steven C. Dunn, Dale Jasinski and Matthew O'Connor

The rapid rise of corporate universities, online degree programs, and the explosive growth in executive education all serve as signals to universities that the concept of a

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid rise of corporate universities, online degree programs, and the explosive growth in executive education all serve as signals to universities that the concept of a learning organization continues to gain momentum in the business community. This paper has the objective of describing a new model for academic/industry partnerships that utilizes traditional professional aspects of higher education (research, teaching, and consulting) to assist individual businesses in their quest to build a sustainable competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first describes the model, discusses implications for business and the academy and then describes its application in an organization.

Findings

The educonsulting (EC) model gives businesses a method linking their investment in education programs to their business strategy, in turn providing a potentially greater return on the investment in human capital development. In addition, the model provides a school of business with a systemic means of professionally developing its faculty and improving its stakeholder relationships.

Originality/value

The EC model described in this paper provides a blueprint for innovative colleges of business and their business partners to link individual development and organizational development to achieve their respective strategic goals.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Matthew O'Connor

This review aims to compile an interdisciplinary inventory of factors affecting individual performance in team environments.

11730

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to compile an interdisciplinary inventory of factors affecting individual performance in team environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Research focusing on the performance of the individual within a team from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, business, and library science was analyzed and synthesized. Five online aggregators and a combination of keyword/subject terms were used to locate the research originating primarily from journal literature.

Findings

After exploring the research, 12 different performance factors emerged in two primary categories: extrinsic and intrinsic. Extrinsic factors included collective efficacy, social rewards and sanctions, social dilemmas, social loafing, future interdependence, and social identity. Intrinsic factors included individual identity, desire to achieve, member role differences, team size, individual status attainment, and member commitment.

Originality/value

There is a substantial amount of research concerning team motivation and production, but there is an apparent dearth related to individual performance factors. This review provides valuable insight for library administrators currently working with teams in their organizations or for those considering it.

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2022

Abstract

Details

Role of Education and Pedagogical Approach in Service Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-188-4

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Glen E. Holt

The purpose of this paper is to show how an effective library manager can handle the issues of employee theft of material, time, data and money.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how an effective library manager can handle the issues of employee theft of material, time, data and money.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews and summarizes some of the literature on the topic and recounts personal experiences.

Findings

There are different types of theft: of physical materials, of non‐financial data, of money, of time.

Originality/value

Presents a useful set of general rules for success in the management of library theft.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Yu-Li Huang

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance on standardizing appointment slot length in a primary care clinic to understand the impact of providers’ preferences and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance on standardizing appointment slot length in a primary care clinic to understand the impact of providers’ preferences and practice differences.

Design/methodology/approach

The treatment time data were collected for each provider. There were six patient types: emergency/urgent care (ER/UC), follow-up patient (FU), new patient, office visit (OV), physical exam, and well-child care. Simulation model was developed to capture patient flow and measure patient wait time, provider idle time, cost, overtime, finish time, and the number of patients scheduled. Four scheduling scenarios were compared: scheduled all patients at 20 minutes; scheduled ER/UC, FU, OV at 20 minutes and others at 40 minutes; scheduled patient types on individual provider preference; and scheduled patient types on combined provider preference.

Findings

Standardized scheduling among providers increase cost by 57 per cent, patient wait time by 83 per cent, provider idle time by five minutes per patient, overtime by 22 minutes, finish time by 30 minutes, and decrease patient access to care by approximately 11 per cent. An individualized scheduling approach could save as much as 14 per cent on cost and schedule 1.5 more patients. The combined preference method could save about 8 per cent while the number of patients scheduled remained the same.

Research limitations/implications

The challenge is to actually disseminate the findings to medical providers and adjust scheduling systems accordingly.

Originality/value

This paper concluded standardization of providers’ clinic preference and practice negatively impact clinic service quality and access to care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2023

Jules Boykoff

Political dissent threads through the history of the Olympic Games. Although the International Olympic Committee (IOC) openly prohibits athletes from injecting politics into the…

Abstract

Political dissent threads through the history of the Olympic Games. Although the International Olympic Committee (IOC) openly prohibits athletes from injecting politics into the Games, Olympians have nevertheless staged protests, using the Olympics to challenge the predominant power structures and institutions. This chapter analyzes outbursts of athlete activism in the context of wider social movements that make these political paroxysms more viable. Social movements scythe political space for athletes, spark athletes' political imaginary, and provide support and cover. From the early days of the Games, Olympic athletes have expressed dissent, as when Irish track-and-field athlete Peter O'Connor rebelled against British colonialism at the 1906 Olympics in Athens. At the Mexico City 1968 Games, Czech gymnast Vera Čáslavská carried out a politically symbolic acts as did US sprinters John Carlos, Tommie Smith, and Wyomia Tyus. At the 1972 Munich Games, US track medalists Vincent Matthews and Wayne Collett protested in nonchalant fashion on the medal stand. At the 1980 Olympics, Polish Olympian Władysław Kozakiewicz issued politically provocative symbology on the pole vault mat that challenged Soviet hegemony. In the twenty-first century, numerous Olympians have made political statements, despite a rule in the Olympic Charter that forbids such activity. In each case, athlete activists were bolstered by vibrant political movements in their home country. In this chapter, I trace the relationship between political Olympians and social movements as well as the wider dialectic of resistance and restriction that encompasses the interplay between dissident Olympians and the IOC.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal…

Abstract

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal took great pains to interpret the intention of the parties to the different site agreements, and it came to the conclusion that the agreed procedure was not followed. One other matter, which must be particularly noted by employers, is that where a final warning is required, this final warning must be “a warning”, and not the actual dismissal. So that where, for example, three warnings are to be given, the third must be a “warning”. It is after the employee has misconducted himself thereafter that the employer may dismiss.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Anahita Baregheh, Thomas Carey and Gina O’Connor

As a sector, higher education is at the low end of innovation rankings. The challenges we face – demographic, technological, political, and pedagogical – will require sustained…

Abstract

As a sector, higher education is at the low end of innovation rankings. The challenges we face – demographic, technological, political, and pedagogical – will require sustained innovation at a strategic level. Recent research with mature companies has identified exemplars in strategic innovation (e.g., O’Connor, Corbett, & Peters, 2018). This work explores whether – and how – higher education institutions might adapt insights from the corporate sector for strategic innovation in teaching and learning.

The introductory section provides an overview of the nature of strategic innovation (and why it is hard to sustain), strategic issues facing higher education, and the status and challenges of sustaining strategic innovation for teaching. The next two sections describe insights from research with corporate exemplars of sustaining strategic innovation. Each section uses a scenario from higher education as a proof-of-concept test to explore the application of the corporate sector insights for strategic innovation in higher education teaching and learning.

The final section of the chapter discusses the planned next steps to prototype and test adaptation of these corporate sector insights with institutional innovation leaders in higher education, as well as additional potential sources of insights (from other research in the corporate sector and from strategic innovation in the public sector).

Details

Governance and Management in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-728-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2022

Temidayo Oluwasola Osunsanmi, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Wellington Didibhuku Thwala and Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke

The idea of implementing supply chain management (SCM) principles for the construction industry was embraced by construction stakeholders to enhance the sector's performance. The…

Abstract

The idea of implementing supply chain management (SCM) principles for the construction industry was embraced by construction stakeholders to enhance the sector's performance. The analysis from the literature revealed that the implementation of SCM in the construction industry enhances the industry's value in terms of cost-saving, time savings, material management, risk management and others. The construction supply chain (CSC) can be managed using the pull or push system. This chapter also discusses the origin and proliferation of SCM into the construction industry. The chapter revealed that the concept of SCM has passed through five different eras: the creation era, the use of ERP, globalisation stage, specialisation stage and electronic stage. The findings from the literature revealed that we are presently in the fourth industrial revolution (4IR) era. At this stage, the SCM witnesses the adoption of technologies and principles driven by the 4IR. This chapter also revealed that the practice of SCM in the construction industry is centred around integration, collaboration, communication and the structure of the supply chain (SC). The forms and challenges hindering the adoption of these practices were also discussed extensively in this chapter.

Details

Construction Supply Chain Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-160-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Matthew Kelly

676

Abstract

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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