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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Donatienne Desmette and Mathieu Gaillard

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived social identity as an “older worker” and attitudes towards early retirement and commitment to work.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived social identity as an “older worker” and attitudes towards early retirement and commitment to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 352 workers aged 50‐59. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to test the influence of social identity after controlling for demographics, organizational variables and work‐to‐family conflict.

Findings

The results show that self‐categorization as an “older worker” is related to negative attitudes towards work (stronger desire to retire early, stronger inclination towards intergenerational competition) while the perception that the organization does not use age as a criterion for distinguishing between workers supports positive attitudes towards work (e.g. higher value placed on work).

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross‐sectional and does not allow conclusions about causality between intergroup processes and attitudes towards works. Future research should develop longitudinal designs to verify that social identity as an “older worker” does induce elders' attitudes at work.

Originality/value

Retirement is usually considered as an individual and opportunistic decision. This research highlights its social dimensions and suggests that managers should pay attention to ageism at work and its potential effects not only on the withdrawal process but also on the quality of life in the workplace.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Peter G. Roma and Wendy L. Bedwell

To better understand contributing factors and mediating mechanisms related to team dynamics in isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environments.

Abstract

Purpose

To better understand contributing factors and mediating mechanisms related to team dynamics in isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environments.

Methodology/approach

Literature review.

Findings

Our primary focus is on cohesion and adaptation – two critical aspects of team performance in ICE environments that have received increased attention in both the literature and funding initiatives. We begin by describing the conditions that define ICE environments and review relevant individual biological, neuropsychiatric, and environmental factors that interact with team dynamics. We then outline a unifying team cohesion framework for long-duration missions and discuss several environmental, operational, organizational, and psychosocial factors that can impact team dynamics. Finally, we end with a discussion of directions for future research and countermeasure development, emphasizing the importance of temporal dynamics, multidisciplinary integration, and novel conceptual frameworks for the inherently mixed work and social setting of long-duration missions in ICE environments.

Social implications

A better understanding of team dynamics over time can contribute to success in a variety of organizational settings, including space exploration, defense and security, business, education, athletics, and social relationships.

Originality/value

We promote a multidisciplinary approach to team dynamics in ICE environments that incorporates dynamic biological, behavioral, psychological, and organizational factors over time.

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Holly Slay Ferraro, Greg Prussia and Shambhavi Mehrotra

The purpose of this paper is to examine how age norms influence the relationship between individual differences, job attitudes, and intentions to pursue career transitions for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how age norms influence the relationship between individual differences, job attitudes, and intentions to pursue career transitions for midlife adults (aged 35 and above). The authors hypothesized that the effects of individual difference variables (i.e. resilience and reframing abilities) on career change intentions in addition to the effects of job attitude (i.e. commitment) on such intentions are moderated by career youth norms (CYN) which the authors defined as perceptions that the typical worker in a career field is younger than midlife.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 206 people comprised the sample which was derived from an online survey. Moderated regression analysis was used to assess the extent to which age norms operated as a moderator of proposed relationships. Control variables were included based on prior research findings.

Findings

Findings demonstrated that age norms operate as a significant moderator for midlife adults. Specifically, the relationships between resilience, reframing, and commitment on intentions to pursue alternative careers are moderated by CYNs.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from a single source and assessed behavioral intentions in place of actual career change choice. Future research should derive data from multiple sources and assess behavior beyond intentions.

Practical implications

Industry leaders’ stereotypes about the appropriate ages for specific occupations or professions may impact the psychological mobility of midlife workers. Managers may wish to highlight midlife workers with particular skills (e.g. technological savvy), examine recruitment advertising for language that emphasizes youth, and invest in resilience training for aging workers.

Originality/value

Research examining careers at midlife and beyond has extensively discussed age discrimination and stereotypes as potential barriers to professional or occupational change. However, few studies have investigated how age norms and the comparisons people make between themselves and those they believe are occupying the jobs they desire may also pose barriers to career transition.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Hila Hofstetter and Aaron Cohen

The study aims to elucidate the relationship between five work experiences or conditions (age-related stereotypes, perceived organizational support [POS], coworker support, career…

2084

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to elucidate the relationship between five work experiences or conditions (age-related stereotypes, perceived organizational support [POS], coworker support, career satisfaction, and reaching a job plateau) and two different organizational withdrawal intentions – early retirement and turnover – in light of trends to abolish or increase the mandatory retirement age in Israel and elsewhere in the Western world.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a survey of a heterogeneous age sample of 170 unionized employees working in medium-sized Israeli industrial firms.

Findings

POS and perceived age stereotypes were negatively related to early retirement intentions and not to turnover intentions. Job plateau was found to be related to the other work-related variables, with the exception of coworker support, and also was found to be a strong mediator between these variables and employees ' turnover intentions, and a partial mediator between the variables and early retirement intentions.

Practical implications

The study suggests a managerial focus on the person-job fit over time as a tool for reducing employees ' turnover intentions, and encouraging continued employee development as a way to reduce early retirement intentions.

Originality/value

The study focuses on the potential role of correctable contextual characteristics in triggering withdrawal responses, in light of the aging of the workforce.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2024

Hannah Lohrmann and Henning Tirrel

This study aims to uncover the theoretical role and the effects of mindfulness on psychological strain as well as job satisfaction among young German employees. The study took…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to uncover the theoretical role and the effects of mindfulness on psychological strain as well as job satisfaction among young German employees. The study took place during the COVID-19 pandemic, which was a stressful time for German employees. Thus, the role of mindfulness should be explained.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 198 participants was used for analysing the relationships by applying partial least squares structural equal modelling.

Findings

This study highlights that, in the working context, mindfulness was statistically significantly and negatively related to psychological strain (ß = −0.498, p < 0.000) and positively as well as statistically significantly related to job satisfaction (ß = 0.263, p < 0.000). Furthermore, psychological strain is negatively but statistically significant related to job satisfaction (ß = −0.207, p < 0.017). Additionally, psychological strain mediates the relationship between mindfulness and job satisfaction positively and significantly (ß = 0.103, p < 0.026).

Originality/value

This study contributes by firstly setting up a conceptual model that explicitly uncovers the paramount importance of mindfulness at work in relation to job satisfaction. Moreover, the authors contribute by highlighting that psychological strain is negatively affected by mindfulness. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the first study examining this interplay and setting up a new conceptual model.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Laura Innocenti, Silvia Profili and Alessia Sammarra

Drawing on social exchange theory, prior research suggests that the adoption of human resources (HR) practices in the areas of training and development helps to maximize…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social exchange theory, prior research suggests that the adoption of human resources (HR) practices in the areas of training and development helps to maximize employees’ positive work attitudes. However, while research has generally assumed that HR practices influence all employees in the same way, there is much evidence that employees’ motives and needs change with age, suggesting that older workers may react differently to the same HR practices as compared to younger colleagues. This study seeks to shed light on this important and under-explored issue, analyzing whether the effect of HR development practices on job satisfaction (JS) and affective commitment is moderated by age in a sample of 37 companies located in Italy, involving a total of 6,182 employees. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a multilevel approach, the results confirm a positive influence of HR development practices in increasing JS and affective commitment and show that this positive relationship weakens with age.

Findings

Indeed, HR development practices were associated with lower JS and affective commitment for the oldest employees. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed suggesting the need to attribute greater consideration to age diversity when tailoring HR practices to improve their effect on employees’ positive work attitudes.

Originality/value

At the theoretical level, the paper contributes to the HRM literature debate, as the role of intervening variables – such as age – in the relationship between HR practices and employees’ attitudes is still an open issue. At the methodological level, the paper tested the hypotheses using a multilevel regression model. The paper combined data at individual and the organizational levels and adopted a multilevel approach in order to provide a better understanding of the way age can moderate the HRM-employee attitudes relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Sarah E. DeYoung, Denise C. Lewis, Desiree M. Seponski, Danielle A. Augustine and Monysakada Phal

Using two main research questions, the purpose of this paper is to examine well-being and preparedness among Cambodian and Laotian immigrants living near the Gulf Coast of the…

1918

Abstract

Purpose

Using two main research questions, the purpose of this paper is to examine well-being and preparedness among Cambodian and Laotian immigrants living near the Gulf Coast of the USA, and the ways in which indicators such as sense of community and risk perception are related to these constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional prospective design to examine disaster preparedness and well-being among Laotian and Cambodian immigrant communities. Quantitative survey data using purposive snowball sampling were collected throughout several months in Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and Louisiana.

Findings

Results from two multiple regressions revealed that sense of community and age contributed to well-being and were significant in the model, but with a negative relationship between age and well-being. Risk perception, confidence in government, confidence in engaging household preparedness and ability to cope with a financial crisis were significant predictors and positively related to disaster preparedness.

Practical implications

Well-being and disaster preparedness can be bolstered through community-based planning that seeks to address urgent needs of the people residing in vulnerable coastal locations. Specifically, immigrants who speak English as a second language, elder individuals and households in the lowest income brackets should be supported in disaster planning and outreach.

Originality/value

Cambodian and Laotian American immigrants rely upon the Gulf Coast’s waters for fishing, crab and shrimp income. Despite on-going hazard and disasters, few studies address preparedness among immigrant populations in the USA. This study fills a gap in preparedness research as well as factors associated with well-being, an important aspect of long-term resilience.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Nicoleta Meslec, Jacco Duel and Joseph Soeters

The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which teamwork (developed either during an initial training phase or during a subsequent deployment phase) is influenced by…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which teamwork (developed either during an initial training phase or during a subsequent deployment phase) is influenced by the nature of the team’s environment (extreme vs non-extreme) and the extent to which teamwork is one of the explaining mechanisms for team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 60 teams at 2 time-points: training phase in The Netherlands or Germany and deployment phase (in locations such as Afghanistan and Bosnia-Herzegovina).

Findings

This study’s results indicate that when teams consider working in extreme environments, they develop higher levels of teamwork as compared to teams expecting to work in non-extreme environments. These differences remain stable also during the deployment phase, such that teams operating in extreme environments will continue to have higher levels of teamwork as compared to teams operating in non-extreme environments.

Originality/value

With this study, the authors contribute to the teamwork quality research stream by empirically studying how teamwork quality develops in unique military contexts such as extreme environments. Studies in such contexts are relatively rare.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Tanaya Nayak, Chandan Kumar Sahoo and Pravat Kumar Mohanty

The purpose of the paper is to explore the relationship between workplace empowerment and employee commitment with quality of work life (QWL) as a mediator in the case of private…

2077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the relationship between workplace empowerment and employee commitment with quality of work life (QWL) as a mediator in the case of private healthcare employees in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a structured questionnaire to collect primary data from 279 employees of private healthcare units in India. AMOS 20 was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Results of data analysis confirm that the proposed hypotheses of the study were significant. Structural equation modelling revealed a best-fit model that demonstrated QWL to be a significant partial mediator between workplace empowerment and employee commitment.

Practical implications

This work provides a pragmatic view about the action mechanism through which workplace empowerment can aid in generating commitment among healthcare employees. The paper also offers insights for healthcare managers, administrators and practitioners.

Originality/value

The research is an attempt to integrate the employees as the core long-term assets of the healthcare system. The study establishes the triadic and symbiotic alliance of workplace empowerment, QWL and employee commitment in the novel context of healthcare.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Philippe Masset, Alexandre Mondoux and Jean-Philippe Weisskopf

This study aims to identify the price determinants of fine wines in a small and competitive market. These characteristics are found in many lesser-known wine-producing countries…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the price determinants of fine wines in a small and competitive market. These characteristics are found in many lesser-known wine-producing countries and are often difficult to analyse because of lack of data.

Design/methodology/approach

This study hand-collects and transcribes wine-related data for 149 Swiss wineries and 2,454 individual wines over the period 2014–2018 directly from wine lists provided by wineries. This study uses multivariate ordinary least squares regressions to analyse the relation between wine attributes and prices and to assess the effect of a currency shock caused by the sudden appreciation of the Swiss franc in 2015 as well as a reduction in information asymmetries induced by the novel coverage of Swiss wines by The Wine Advocate.

Findings

Prices mainly depend on collective reputation, production techniques and product positioning. Surprisingly, following a sharp appreciation of the Swiss franc, producers did not reduce prices. The arrival of a highly influential wine expert on the market also had a positive price effect on rated wines and producers. Both hint at wineries attempting to position themselves relative to competitors.

Originality/value

Few studies examine the price drivers in lesser-known wine markets, where competition is fierce. This study’s results show that wine pricing differs from other more famous and larger wine regions. In addition, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is also the first to analyse the impact of a currency shock and a reduction in information asymmetries on wine prices.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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