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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Mark L. Hoelscher

Scholars have articulated the importance of family capital for successful family business outcomes. In the review of literature, empirical evidence supporting this assertion has…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholars have articulated the importance of family capital for successful family business outcomes. In the review of literature, empirical evidence supporting this assertion has been lacking. The purpose of this paper is to offer an empirical study of the relationship between family capital and family business success as well as the moderating effects of conflict to this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical regression was used in this study. Using a sample of 299 firms the author investigates the relationship between family capital and family business performance as well as the moderating role of conflict on this relationship.

Findings

Results support the notion that family capital is a significant predictor of family business performance. Furthermore, the author finds that task conflict moderates the relationship between family capital and family business performance, while relational conflict has no impact on performance.

Practical implications

The revelation that family capital can lead to a sustained competitive advantage makes the decision to support and nurture it much easier. Also, family capital appears to compensate for ineffective levels of task conflict. Finally, family capital shows much promise in being that rare, valuable, inimitable, and unsubstitutable resource that leads to sustained competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This research begins the empirical validation process for the theoretical construct family capital as well as exploring the moderating relationship of conflict.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

James J. Hoffman, Mark L. Hoelscher and Karma Sherif

This article attempts to begin the process of removing the cloak of causal ambiguity by examining the role that knowledge management has in the creation of the wide variety of

10551

Abstract

Purpose

This article attempts to begin the process of removing the cloak of causal ambiguity by examining the role that knowledge management has in the creation of the wide variety of competitive advantages found in some organizations. Specifically, this article aims to extend understanding in the field of knowledge management by examining how knowledge management can affect organizational performance, and by examining one possible determinant of an organization's capacity to manage knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews literature on resources‐advantage theory of the firm, social capital and knowledge management to propose ways within the organization to improve their ability to manage knowledge and achieve sustained superior performance. The paper is structured around the following constructs: resource‐advantage theory of the firm, social capital, and knowledge management.

Findings

Describes the relationship between social capital and knowledge management and how both help organizations achieve a sustained superior performance within the market. Suggests that organizations with high levels of social capital have more knowledge‐management capabilities than organizations with low levels of social capital.

Research limitations/implications

This article extends prior research of knowledge management by proposing how social capital can positively impact the ability of organizations to manage knowledge.

Practical implications

Since resources within all businesses are relatively limited, and particularly so when the business is small relative to its competitors, the revelation that social capital can lead to more effective knowledge management makes the decision to support and nurture social‐capital development much more credible.

Originality/value

Because there is no existing literature that has examined the relationship between social capital, knowledge management, and organizational performance, this paper provides a foundation for future studies that examine the relationship between social capital and knowledge management.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Transitions from Vocational Qualifications to Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-996-6

Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2024

Elveta D. Smith

The years following the 9/11/2001 terrorists attacks saw a marked increase in community and hospital emergency preparedness, from communications across community networks…

Abstract

Purpose

The years following the 9/11/2001 terrorists attacks saw a marked increase in community and hospital emergency preparedness, from communications across community networks, development of policies and procedures, to attainment and training in the use of biological warfare resources. Regular drills ensured emergency and health care personnel were trained and prepared to address the next large-scale crisis, especially from terrorist and bioterrorist attacks. This chapter looks at some of the more familiar global health issues over the past two decades and the lessons learned from hospital responses to inform hospital management in preparation for future incidents.

Search Methods

This study is a narrative review of the literature related to lessons learned from four major events in the time period from 2002 to 2023 – SARS, MERS, Ebola, and COVID-19.

Search Results

The initial search yielded 25,913 articles; 57 articles were selected for inclusion in the study.

Discussion and Conclusions

Comparison of key issues and lessons learned among the four major events described in this article – SARS, MERS, Ebola, and COVID-19 – highlight that several lessons are “relearned” with each event. Other key issues, such as supply shortages, staffing availability, and hospital capacity to simultaneously provide care to noninfectious patients came to the forefront during the COVID-19 pandemic. A primary, ongoing concern for hospitals is how to maintain their preparedness given competing priorities, resources, and staff time. This concern remains post-COVID-19.

Details

Research and Theory to Foster Change in the Face of Grand Health Care Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83797-655-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2022

Mollie T. Adams, Kerry K. Inger and Michele D. Meckfessel

The purpose of this chapter is to serve as a resource for accounting faculty seeking tax-related cases to include in their courses. This annotated bibliography provides a table…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to serve as a resource for accounting faculty seeking tax-related cases to include in their courses. This annotated bibliography provides a table and discussion of 50 educational tax cases published in six major accounting journals from 2003 to 2021. Cases are classified and discussed by recommended course placement. In addition, the authors make observations about trends in case content and format. This chapter complements the Fogarty (2022) review and commentary on tax cases published in this volume.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-727-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2002

David D. Dawley, James J. Hoffman and Mark Hoelscher

This paper develops a theory regarding the determinants of post-bankruptcy performance of healthcare firms. Specifically examined are the potential effects of strategic change…

Abstract

This paper develops a theory regarding the determinants of post-bankruptcy performance of healthcare firms. Specifically examined are the potential effects of strategic change (i.e. refocusing), organizational size, slack and munificence on post-bankruptcy performance. It is theorized that bankrupt healthcare firms that refocus have greater post-bankruptcy performance than all other firms. It is also theorized that greater organizational size, slack, and munificence enhance post-bankruptcy performance. The theory developed in this paper highlights the benefits of refocusing the diversified healthcare firm, the liabilities associated with diversification in the healthcare industry, and organizational ecology theories and perspectives regarding organizational size, slack, and munificence. In addition, this paper aims to provide richer insight into our understanding of the post-bankruptcy performance of healthcare firms.

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-176-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Terry Gibson

Abstract

Details

Making Aid Agencies Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-509-2

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Richard C.K. Burdekin and Mark E. Wohar

The relative impacts of the monetised and non‐monetised deficit onoutput and inflation in the United States are assessed using annual datafor the 1923‐1982 period. With Federal…

Abstract

The relative impacts of the monetised and non‐monetised deficit on output and inflation in the United States are assessed using annual data for the 1923‐1982 period. With Federal Reserve purchases of government debt serving as a measure of monetisation, the results of Granger causality tests suggest that for the period 1923‐1960 neither deficit growth nor monetisation affected real GNP growth, nominal GNP growth or inflation. For the period 1961‐1982, monetisation is found to have fuelled inflation with no effect on real GNP. Non‐monetised deficits provided a negative short‐run impact on the rate of inflation over this latter period.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2018

Aliaa AlSadaty

The relationship between collective memory and the built environment is a complex relationship. Though the concept of memory is fragile, the maintenance and continuation of urban…

Abstract

The relationship between collective memory and the built environment is a complex relationship. Though the concept of memory is fragile, the maintenance and continuation of urban memory are essential to maintain groups' identities and to support the sense of place and place attachment between community members and the architectural settings they use and/or reside in. Preserving the physical aspects of buildings, spaces and settings that are linked with memory, is important to preserve the memory, however, the mere preservation does not guarantee the continuation of memory. The maintenance and continuation of memory is a process that depends on several factors, where the preservation of the physical aspects is only one among several. This paper aims at a better understanding of the intricate relationship between collective memory and the built environment, focusing on the processes of formation, stimulation and consolidation of memory. The paper sheds the lights on historic houses that are embedded with significant meanings and memories to their social contexts. It claims that historic houses can easily shift from ‘potential cultural memory' to ‘actual cultural memory' that could act as pillars of memory to their surrounding community, if the conservation process is done comprehensively, that is to include not only the physical and spatial aspects of memory but also to tackle the social dimensions of memory as well. The paper is organized into three sections: the first investigates the memory formation process, focusing on the social and the spatial dimension of memory, then the second investigates the possible channels to memory stimulation and consolidation, and finally, as a case study, the third section investigates the memory of two historic houses in Cairo, Egypt. The review of the works undertaken in the two houses highlights the difference and the distance between the concept of restoration and the essence of conservation. Findings yielded that, urban memory is an important aspect of cultural heritage that should to be captured and preserved for current and future generations, an aspect that is missing in local conservation approaches. Moreover, to be maintained, urban memory needs physical, social and moral props.

Details

Open House International, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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