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1 – 10 of 13
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Dirk Börner, Christian Glahn, Slavi Stoyanov, Marco Kalz and Marcus Specht

The present paper introduces concept mapping as a structured participative conceptualization approach to identify clusters of ideas and opinions generated by experts within the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The present paper introduces concept mapping as a structured participative conceptualization approach to identify clusters of ideas and opinions generated by experts within the domain of mobile learning. Utilizing this approach, the paper aims to contribute to a definition of key domain characteristics by identifying the main educational concepts related to mobile learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A short literature review points out the attempts to find a clear definition for mobile learning as well as the different perspectives taken. Based on this an explorative case study was conducted, focusing on the educational problems that underpin the expectations on mobile learning. Using the concept mapping approach the study identified these educational problems and the related domain concepts. The respective results were then analyzed and discussed.

Findings

The chosen approach produced several means to interpret the experts' ideas and opinions, such as a cluster map illustrating and structuring substantial accordances. These means help to gain new insights on the emphasis and relation of the core educational concepts of mobile learning. The core educational concepts of mobile learning identified are: “access to learning”, “contextual learning”, “orchestrating learning across contexts”, “personalization”, and “collaboration”.

Originality/value

The paper is original as it uses a unique conceptualization approach to work out the educational problems that can be addressed by mobile learning and thus contributes to a domain definition based on identified issues, featured concepts, and derived challenges. In contrast to existing approaches for defining mobile learning, the present approach relies completely on the expertise of domain experts.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Mohamed Amine Chatti, Anggraeni, Matthias Jarke, Marcus Specht and Katherine Maillet

The personal learning environment driven approach to learning suggests a shift in emphasis from a teacher‐driven knowledge‐push to a learner‐driven knowledge‐pull learning model…

Abstract

Purpose

The personal learning environment driven approach to learning suggests a shift in emphasis from a teacher‐driven knowledge‐push to a learner‐driven knowledge‐pull learning model. One concern with knowledge‐pull approaches is knowledge overload. The concepts of collective intelligence and the Long Tail provide a potential solution to help learners cope with the problem of knowledge overload. The paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on these concepts, the paper proposes a filtering mechanism that taps the collective intelligence to help learners find quality in the Long Tail, thus overcoming the problem of knowledge overload.

Findings

The paper presents theoretical, design, and implementation details of PLEM, a Web 2.0 driven service for personal learning management, which acts as a Long Tail aggregator and filter for learning.

Originality/value

The primary aim of PLEM is to harness the collective intelligence and leverage social filtering methods to rank and recommend learning entities.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Ismail Khalil

416

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Alistair Inglis

233

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2014

Grant C. Madsen, Jeffrey S. Bednar and Paul C. Godfrey

We believe that management and strategy scholars should engage in research around the role of informal economic activity in the perpetuation of poverty on the African continent.

Abstract

Purpose

We believe that management and strategy scholars should engage in research around the role of informal economic activity in the perpetuation of poverty on the African continent.

Design/methodology/approach

We argue that the study of informal economic activity, because of its explicit and often purposefully created hidden nature, requires a new method of inquiry and we propose that the practice of hermeneutics provides such a method. Our chapter describes the foundations of hermeneutic research and outlines key principles to guide inquiry.

Findings

We move from a rigorous introduction to the general method (a form of hermeneutic investigation) and its implementation in the narrative interview. The chapter concludes with a set of practical guidelines to help researchers employ narrative interviews to uncover collective memory structures and gain deeper insight and real understanding of the workings of informal economies.

Originality/value

We believe this chapter will motivate management and strategy scholars to examine the role of informal economic activity in the perpetuation of poverty in Africa and provide a starting point for developing the tools necessary to engage in research that creates a real and deep understanding of the contexts of poverty on the African continent.

Details

Advancing Research Methodology in the African Context: Techniques, Methods, and Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-489-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

M.R. Mathews

Reviews 25 years of social and environmental accounting literature in an attempt to evaluate the position and answer the question posed in the title, as well as to provide a…

16157

Abstract

Reviews 25 years of social and environmental accounting literature in an attempt to evaluate the position and answer the question posed in the title, as well as to provide a structure or classification for others to use. In order to structure the task, uses three time periods: 1971‐1980; 1981‐1990; and 1991‐1995, and classifies the literature into several sub‐groups including empirical studies, normative statements, philosophical discussion, non‐accounting literature, teaching programmes and textbooks, regulatory frameworks, and other reviews. Attempts, after the classification, to synthesize an overall chronological position. Concludes that there is something to celebrate after 25 years. However, the continued success of this field is dependent on a relatively small number of researchers, writers, and specialized journals without which there would be the danger of a collapse of interest and a loss of what has been gained so far. Consequently, the provision of a place in the advanced undergraduate and graduate curriculum is a major task for the next decade. Argues that appropriately qualified and motivated professionals are needed to contribute to environmental policy and management in both the public and private sectors. However, appropriate educational programmes have not been evident to date.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The aim was to identify the competencies professionals need to promote co-creation engagement within communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Co-creation could contribute to building community capacity to promote health. Professional development is key to support co-creative practices. Participants were professionals in a position to promote co-creation processes in health-promoting welfare settings across Denmark, Portugal, France and United Kingdom. An overarching unstructured topic guide was used within interviews, focus groups, questionnaires and creative activities.

Findings

The need to develop competencies to promote co-creation was high across all countries. Creating a common understanding of co-creation and the processes involved to increase inclusivity, engagement and shared understanding was also necessary. Competencies included: How to run co-creation from the beginning of the process right through to evaluation, using feedback and communication throughout using an open action-oriented approach; initiating a perspective change and committing to the transformation of co-creation into a real-life process.

Practical implications

Overall, learning about underlying principles, process initiation, implementation and facilitation of co-creation were areas identified to be included within a co-creation training programme. This can be applied through the framework of enabling change, advocating for co-creative processes, mediating through partnership, communication, leadership, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation and research, ethical values and knowledge of co-creative processes.

Originality/value

This study provides novel findings on the competencies needed for health promoting professionals to embed co-creative processes within their practice, and the key concerns that professionals with a position to mediate co-creation have in transferring the abstract term of co-creation into a real-world practice.

Details

Health Education, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Lavina Sharma and Mallika Srivastava

The higher education, universities and institutions across the world have increasingly adopted information and communication technology (ICT) as a tool for curriculum development…

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Abstract

Purpose

The higher education, universities and institutions across the world have increasingly adopted information and communication technology (ICT) as a tool for curriculum development, learning and teaching, and for administrative activities. The use of technology to facilitate learning is gaining acceptance across various educational institutions. In order to use technology in the best possible manner, it becomes essential that the teacher should be willing to accept the technology and use it for the teaching activities. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to understand the teachers’ motivation toward adopting technology in the higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory-descriptive approach is used in this research. The sampling frame for the study is the teachers employed in the management institutes in Bengaluru, Pune, Indore and Delhi. A simple random sampling technique is used for identifying the sample for the study. A self-administered questionnaire was employed to measure the validity of items measuring the teacher’s intention to use technology.

Findings

The results of the study confirm a significant positive impact of value beliefs (VB), social influence (SI) and perceived ease of use (PEOU) on the behavioral intention (BI) to use technology by the teachers. However, the study does not establish the relationship between self-efficacy and BI to use technology by teachers.

Practical implications

The use of technology will be an important area in the field of higher education where it becomes crucial to understand the motivation factors that lead to the adoption of ICT in the classroom and the curriculum. In order to successfully integrate technology into the teaching-learning process, it is concluded that the factors that positively influence the BI to use technology include the VB, PEOU and the SI.

Originality/value

This study contributes toward the study of teachers’ motivation in the adoption of technology in higher education in India.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Kanimozhi Narayanan and Chanki Moon

Antecedents and outcomes of workplace deviance have been studied over the past few decades but there is still a lack of research from an organizational climate, witness and…

Abstract

Purpose

Antecedents and outcomes of workplace deviance have been studied over the past few decades but there is still a lack of research from an organizational climate, witness and cultural point of view. Theoretical considerations for the present research are based on the social cognitive theory perspective where the authors expect employees's involvement in workplace destructive deviance would depend on their organizational climate perception, witness behavior and cultural orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 987 participants from India (N = 404) and USA (N = 583) completed an online questionnaire, and multi-group structural equation modeling analysis was conducted to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

Across cultural groups, higher collectivism is associated with lower engagement in workplace deviance. Furthermore, employees' higher intervening witness behavior is associated with lower destructive deviant behaviors when employees showed higher endorsement of collectivism in India (not USA). However, employees' higher self-serving witness behavior is associated with higher destructive deviant behaviors. Interestingly, employees with higher endorsement of individualism associated with organizational climate are more likely to engage in destructive deviance.

Originality/value

The main originality of this study is to further increase the understanding of the relationship between organizational climate, witness behavior (self-serving and intervening behavior) and workplace deviance (organizational and interpersonal destructive deviance) considering the role of employees' cultural orientation (individualism vs collectivism).

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Tibor Koltay

A wide choice of varied information and data-based tools is reviewed in order to determine their ability treating symptoms of the COVID-19 infodemic. Several literacies and…

Abstract

Purpose

A wide choice of varied information and data-based tools is reviewed in order to determine their ability treating symptoms of the COVID-19 infodemic. Several literacies and derived literacies, presumably having the ability to fulfil these roles are enumerated. There is also a review of the impact of applying deconstruction, understanding, and anticipation as well as of tools for mitigating overload phenomena, and communication overload.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reviews literacies deemed to promise reducing the impact of the information crisis, caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

A non-exhaustive review of literature, taken from sources of varied disciplines, resulting from reverse snowballing and forward citation mining confirmed that there is a wide choice of solutions from among literacies, derived literacies and other approaches that have the potential to combat annoyance and anxiety, caused by the infodemic.

Originality/value

No other, published research has looked at such a wide range of literacies and derived literacies, as well as other, related approaches linked them to the COVID-19 infodemic.

1 – 10 of 13