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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Stephanie Best, Arja Koski, Lynne Walsh and Päivi Vuokila-Oikkonen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of innovative teaching methods and share a four-step model, to promote the use of co-production in mental health practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of innovative teaching methods and share a four-step model, to promote the use of co-production in mental health practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach highlights three real-life examples of day to day experiences in mental health nurse education with innovative approaches to sharing and developing co-production skills and attitudes in mental health student nurses.

Findings

The case studies highlight three settings where undergraduate mental health nurses experience co-production through a world café event and dialogical community development. Common themes include setting the environment, developing a common aim and relationship building.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this paper is that only three case studies are provided, further examples would provide a greater pool of exemplars for others to draw on. However, by focusing upon student nurse education in learning environment, these examples are transferable to other settings.

Practical implications

The practical applications are summarised in a four-step model that can help develop co-productive teaching methods; enable educators to set the climate and generate an understanding of co-production that empowers students and service users.

Social implications

The emphasis and relevance of promoting co-productive working habits early on in nurses’ mental health nursing careers will enable them to raise awareness of future social implications for a range of client groups.

Originality/value

This paper focuses upon mental health student nurses whilst providing an innovative model to facilitate co-production experiences applicable in a range of settings.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Chinwe H. Ikpeze

Purpose – The purpose of the study was to understand if / how making e-books can facilitate digital literacy skills among teacher candidates.Design – The research design was a…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of the study was to understand if / how making e-books can facilitate digital literacy skills among teacher candidates.

Design – The research design was a qualitative case study. Data were collected from the student’s e-book, student’s e-book reflective commentary, and questionnaire as well as course reflection. Multimodality and the technological, pedagogical content knowledge (CK) provided the theoretical framework.

Findings – The findings of this qualitative case study indicate that making e-books do facilitate the acquisition of digital literacy and technological pedagogical content knowledge among teacher candidates. In addition, the project promoted transmediation and differentiation of instruction. It facilitated divergent thinking and knowledge of instructional design as well as the affordances and constraints of multimodal tools.

Practical Implications – This study contributes to the literature on e-books and their role in digital literacy development among teacher candidates. The study supports the need to provide teachers with the opportunity for inquiry-oriented and design-based projects that enable them to be knowledge generators. Teachers should be allowed to experiment with digital and multimodal tools, and in the process, create opportunities for transmediation and differentiation of instruction for their students.

Details

Best Practices in Teaching Digital Literacies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-434-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Lynne Friedli

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Lynne Bolen and Brian H. Kleiner

In the changing demographics of American society, workplace diversity is today's reality. Organisations that refuse to recognise this fact risk failure in the future. Managing…

6779

Abstract

In the changing demographics of American society, workplace diversity is today's reality. Organisations that refuse to recognise this fact risk failure in the future. Managing diversity is a business issue, not a moral, social, or legal concern. The challenge is not creating a diverse workforce, but empowering one. It is about enlightening managers to persuade a diverse workforce to raise its productivity by utilising all members to their fullest potential, thereby increasing profitability or effectiveness. Diversity refers not just to race and gender, but encompasses differences such as ages, merged companies, union/non‐union, exempt/non‐exempt, organisational newcomers and organisational oldtimers. The goal is to get the level of performance from a heterogeneous group that was formerly attained by the homogeneous group. Learning to manage diversity makes companies more competitive. In order to effectively manage diversity, organisational culture change is usually necessary.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

John Ashworth and Lynne Evans

This paper tests the extended tax‐smoothing model for a sample of 32 developing countries. Importantly, the testable implications employed relax the assumption of constant money…

960

Abstract

This paper tests the extended tax‐smoothing model for a sample of 32 developing countries. Importantly, the testable implications employed relax the assumption of constant money velocity. Although seigniorage is an important source of revenue in developing countries, all the evidence indicates that the principles of optimal taxation have not been used when developing countries raise revenue from inflation.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

John Raeburn

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2015

Aaron T. Rowland

The Latin American region experienced an electoral shift to the political left during the 2000s but this leftist shift did not radically alter the political economy of the region…

Abstract

Purpose

The Latin American region experienced an electoral shift to the political left during the 2000s but this leftist shift did not radically alter the political economy of the region. Following Jessop’s (2008) strategic-relational approach to theorizing about the state, this paper focuses on the perspective that the structure of the state is both an outcome of prior social struggles and a structuring mechanism for the social actors that attempt to enact political and economic reforms.

Methodology/approach

After demonstrating what this has historically meant for the types of state that have existed in Latin America during the past century by reviewing some of the literature on the corporatist and bureaucratic-authoritarian states and clientelism, this paper argues that the neoliberal reforms of the 1980s and 1990s constituted a new type of state – the Latin American neoliberal state. This analysis is then focused on the literature that seeks to describe the new lefts in the region, while continuing to focus on the role of the neoliberal state in structuring these new lefts’ terrain of struggle.

Findings

Understanding the new lefts in Latin America and the types of reforms that they are capable of making requires that we better understand this new type of state. Due to the structural limitations imposed by the neoliberal state, the lefts are not able to radically alter the region’s political economy.

Details

States and Citizens: Accommodation, Facilitation and Resistance to Globalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-180-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Susan Hazan

163

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2020

Jaclyn K. Schwartz, Mavara Agrawal, Ingris Treminio, Sofia Espinosa, Melissa Rodriguez and Lynne Richard

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience significant health-care disparities across physical and mental health domains resulting in poorer health and quality of life…

Abstract

Purpose

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience significant health-care disparities across physical and mental health domains resulting in poorer health and quality of life. Poor transitions to adult care negatively impact the health of adults with ASD. Current research focuses on personal factors in research samples that lack diversity. The purpose of this study is to examine the lived health-care experiences of geographically and ethnically diverse young adults with ASD in adult care settings in the USA to understand provider and system-level factors affecting their health.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine caregivers of young adults with ASD participated in key informant interviews describing their experiences in navigating the health-care system. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach.

Findings

The data indicated that limited quantity of services, poor quality of services, and high cost of services had a negative effect on the health of adults with ASD. Issues cascaded to become more complex.

Practical implications

Practical implications for payors, providers, persons with ASD and their families are discussed in this paper.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study answers the call to better understand system-level factors affecting the health of geographically and ethnically diverse people with ASD.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Jenny Lynne Semenza, Regina Koury and Catherine Gray

This article aims to provide a comprehensive step by step plan on creating a Zombie Library, a physical collection of e‐books through the use of QR codes. Drawing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide a comprehensive step by step plan on creating a Zombie Library, a physical collection of e‐books through the use of QR codes. Drawing on the collective authors' experience working with the QR codes creation, this article aims to help librarians interested in promoting e‐book collections and creating QR‐coded Zombie books in their libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was performed using library databases, as well as consulting various online library subject guides on the use of QR codes in libraries. Between November 2011 and October 2012 Idaho State University (ISU) library executed a plan for creating QR codes for a Gale Virtual Reference Library e‐book collection.

Findings

The study found an increased usage of the e‐book collection. The actual physical production of the items was more time‐consuming than originally expected. The Zombie Library project received a lot of support and enthusiasm from the campus community. Plans are being made to expand this project to other e‐book collections and other physical media (posters, bookmarks, etc.). This article combines promoting e‐book collections with physical representations of the e‐book via QR codes.

Originality/value

This article is an inclusive step by step plan for promoting e‐book collections using QR codes.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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