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Article

Rabia Aslam, Najmonnisa Khan, Muhammad Mujtaba Asad and Ushaque Ahmed

This paper aims to address the relationship of teachers’ technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and their technology proficiency according to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the relationship of teachers’ technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and their technology proficiency according to the International Society for Technology in Education Standards for Teachers (ISTE-ST) in public and private universities of Karachi, Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative approach with survey research design was used. In total, 520 teachers of public and private universities were selected on the basis of simple random sampling technique. Data was collected through questionnaire distribution.

Findings

Strong significant correlation was found between teacher’ TPACK and teachers’ technology proficiency, teachers’ ability to engage in professional development and teachers’ ability to promote digital citizenship and responsibilities in students.

Originality/value

TPACK and ISTE-ST are used for effective teaching. TPACK is used to measure teachers’ ability to integrate technology in their teaching, while ISTE-ST is used to measure the proficiency technology integration. This study is unique as it discusses the relationship of TPACK and ISTE-ST framework in term of teachers’ ability to promote digital citizenship and responsibilities in students and teachers’ ability to engage themselves in professional development program.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Book part

Matt Bower

This chapter introduces the Technology Pedagogy and Content Knowledge (TPACK) model as it relates to technology-enhanced learning design. The key features of the framework…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the Technology Pedagogy and Content Knowledge (TPACK) model as it relates to technology-enhanced learning design. The key features of the framework are unpacked, along with a brief examination of what TPACK looks like in practice. Approaches to developing TPACK capacity are considered, with learning-by-design emerging as the most promising technique. Issues relating to TPACK are also critically discussed, including those relating to measurement and the capacity of the framework to support educational design practice.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

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Book part

Christa L. Wilkin, Cristina Rubino, Deone Zell and Lois M. Shelton

Technology is transforming teaching in ways that break down classroom walls while improving course quality and capitalizing on educators’ creativity. Rather than using…

Abstract

Technology is transforming teaching in ways that break down classroom walls while improving course quality and capitalizing on educators’ creativity. Rather than using technology in an ad hoc way, technology needs to fit the content and pedagogical style of the teacher.Our chapter builds on the extant literature on the necessary knowledge to integrate content, pedagogy, and technology (TPACK) in the classroom. We propose a comprehensive model that outlines the factors that lead to the development of TPACK, the relationship between TPACK and the use of technology, and outcomes gleaned from technology-enhanced learning.Our proposed model is an important first step to considering the precursors and outcomes of TPACK, which will need to be validated empirically. We extend the TPACK framework by identifying the predictors of TPACK such as teacher self-efficacy, experience with technology, and student factors. We argue that the extent to which educators develop their TPACK and use technology is bound by contextual factors such as organizational culture, resources, and student characteristics. Without considering the extensions that are identified in the Technology Integration Model, the linkages between TPACK and desirable outcomes (e.g., student engagement) are unclear. As a result, our proposed model has implications for educators and institutions alike.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Classroom Technologies: Classroom Response Systems and Mediated Discourse Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-512-8

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Article

Semila Fernandes, Pooja Gupta and V.V. Ajith Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to measure the academic motives of faculty in higher education to understand the pattern of relationships between work motivation scale (WMS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the academic motives of faculty in higher education to understand the pattern of relationships between work motivation scale (WMS) and technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK).

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts regression analysis to help model the data collected from 63 faculty members from India. The empirical study investigated the relationship of intrinsic motivation (IntrM), integrated motivation (InteM), identified motivation (IdenM), introjected motivation (IntrjM), external regulation motivation (ExtR) and amotivation (Amot) with each of technological knowledge (TK), (pedagogical knowledge (PK), content knowledge (CK) and TPACK.

Findings

Optimal functioning among faculty was due to “InteM” followed by “IntrM” and “IdenM” that yielded most positive consequence (mean values>3.9). “ExtR” and “Amot” were the negative outcomes that would be counterproductive and result in employee dejection (Mean values<3.1). The results proved that all TPACK variables were positively related to “IntrM” – a self-determined motivation. Additionally, “TK” and “PK’ were positively related to “IntrjM” – a behavior that is regulated by self-esteem and self-worth; “TPACK” depicted positive relationship with “IntrjM” and negative correlation with “IdenM.”

Research limitations/implications

The study supported the fact that TPACK and WMS when analyzed together can create better engagement models among the faculty for an enriching learner experience interaction. Furthermore, it would help identify specific strategies on teacher development training programs through the integration of technology.

Originality/value

The study is original and seeks to inspect the relationship between TPACK and WMS among faculty of higher education in Indian business schools.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Jörgen Holmberg, Göran Fransson and Uno Fors

The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of teachers’ reframing of practice in digital contexts by analysing teachers’ pedagogical reasoning processes as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of teachers’ reframing of practice in digital contexts by analysing teachers’ pedagogical reasoning processes as they explore ways of using information and communication technologies (ICT) to create added pedagogical value.

Design/methodology/approach

A design-based research (DBR) approach is employed, in which the on-site researcher collaborates with eight teachers of English as a foreign language in four Swedish schools over a period of two years. Multiple data sources are included for thematic coding and analysis. The technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework is used as a conceptual construct in the analysis.

Findings

The findings show that teachers’ pedagogical reasoning is a complex and multidimensional process and is closely integrated with teachers’ reframing of practice. Common characteristics in the teachers’ reframing of practice are identified. The results highlight the reciprocal relationship between developments in teachers’ pedagogical reasoning and TPACK development and the need for a distinction between general and specific, theoretical and practical TPACK.

Research limitations/implications

An increased focus on TPACK research on teachers’ pedagogical reasoning is required. DBR is a relevant approach for this.

Practical implications

The pedagogical uses of ICT identified as adding value could benefit teachers in other contexts.

Originality/value

Rich data from multiple design contexts are collected and analysed over time through DBR. The paper contributes new knowledge about the process of pedagogical reasoning and its relation to teachers’ reframing of practice. The paper also contributes to TPACK theory development.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article

Terrie McLaughlin Galanti, Courtney Katharine Baker, Kimberly Morrow-Leong and Tammy Kraft

In spring 2020, educators throughout the world abruptly shifted to emergency remote teaching in response to an emerging pandemic. The instructors of a graduate-level…

Abstract

Purpose

In spring 2020, educators throughout the world abruptly shifted to emergency remote teaching in response to an emerging pandemic. The instructors of a graduate-level synchronous online geometry and measurement course for practicing school teachers redesigned their summative assessments. Their goals were to reduce outside-of-class work and to model the integration of content, pedagogy and technology. This paper aims to describe the development of a digital interactive notebook (dINB) assignment using online presentation software, dynamic geometry tools and mathematical learning trajectories. Broader implications for dINBs as assessments in effective distance learning are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative analysis in this study consists of a sequence of first-cycle coding of mid-semester surveys and second-cycle thematic categorizations of mid-semester surveys and end-of-course reflections. Descriptive categorization counts along with select quotations from open-ended participant responses provided a window on evolving participant experiences with the dINB across the course.

Findings

Modifications to the dINB design based on teacher mid-semester feedback created a flexible assessment tool aligned with the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework. The teachers also constructed their own visions for adapting the dINB for student-centered instructional technology integration in their own virtual classrooms.

Originality/value

The development of the dINB enriched the TPACK understandings of the instructors in this study. It also positioned teachers to facilitate innovative synchronous and blended learning in their own school communities. Further analysis of dINB artifacts in future studies will test the hypothesis that practicing teachers’ experiences as learners increased their TPACK knowledge.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Book part

Peter Hubber and Esther Loong

There have been calls to embed Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into pre-service teacher courses in preference to technology only courses as a means to…

Abstract

There have been calls to embed Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into pre-service teacher courses in preference to technology only courses as a means to provide graduate pre-service teachers with the necessary skills to integrate ICT into their teaching practice. This chapter describes a case study of a pre-service science education curriculum course that was designed to embed ICT into its curriculum, assessment and delivery. The tutor modelled best teaching practice in the use of learning technologies. The theoretical framework is Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) viewed through a representation construction approach. This approach involved the students undertaking a series of representational challenges where they constructed and critiqued representations. The study found increased student engagement with learning technologies and an enhanced TPACK over the period of the course. Several factors that may have led to these findings are discussed.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention in e-learning Environments: Web 2.0 and Blended Learning Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-515-9

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Article

Vicki A. Hosek and Lara J. Handsfield

The purpose of this study was to examine teacher decisions surrounding opportunities for student voice, experiences and beliefs in digital classroom communities. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine teacher decisions surrounding opportunities for student voice, experiences and beliefs in digital classroom communities. The teachers’ decisions reflect monologic rather than dialogic teacher pedagogies which prompted the authors to ask the following question: What led to these teacher-centered practices in digital environments?

Design/methodology/approach

Authoritative discourses in school policies and a missing connection between critical pedagogies and teachers’ technology practices are examined in light of teachers’ decisions to engage in monologic and/or dialogic teaching practices. The authors propose professional development and research that emphasize pedagogy that supports student voice as foundational to practices involving digital literacies.

Findings

Examination of the teachers’ decisions showed monologic practices void of student opportunities to critically engage in digital environments. Dominant discourses imposed through protectionist and digital citizenship policies of schools as well as lack of opportunity through professional development to connect critical pedagogy to technology impacted the teachers’ decisions.

Originality/value

Current research surrounding teachers’ digital literacies uses the TPACK framework to examine technology integration practices. Missing is a critical component that addresses and works to dismantle the dominant discourses and power structures in digital communities (Author, 2018). The authors build on research in critical digital literacies to argue for adding the critical missing “C” into the TPACK framework (C-TPACK) to move researchers and educators to consider pedagogies that examine ideologies at work in digital communities to provide opportunities for student voice.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

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Article

Cathy Cavanaugh, Jace Hargis, Tayeb Kamali and Melissa Soto

This article aims to present an examination of the first six months of a national college-level iPad implementation project involving 14,000 new students based on faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present an examination of the first six months of a national college-level iPad implementation project involving 14,000 new students based on faculty shift from substituting their teaching methods with mobile technology to augmentation of teaching methods with new affordances of mobile technology.

Design/methodology/approach

A χ2 analysis of descriptions of teaching practices at a baseline sharing event among teachers (called iCelebrate) and a second similar event (iCelebrate2) was used to compare the abstracts for the events using an alpha of 0.05. The parameters examined were five indicators from the technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) model including the substitution, augmentation, modification and redefinition (SAMR) levels of technology integration.

Findings

No significant difference (p=0.069) was found in the technology focus of abstracts, although there was a significant (p=0.0015) difference in the content focus. There was no significant difference (p=0.129) for the pedagogical focus. For technology integration into content teaching, there was no significant difference (p=0.379) in level of substitution versus other levels (augmentation, modification or redefinition), although substitution increased to higher levels; with a corresponding decrease in abstracts that focused merely on substitution. For the level of technology adoption, there was a significant difference (p=0.0083) in levels, with a shift to higher levels of integration.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that it relies on volunteer faculty who were motivated to adopt the mobile learning tools and to share their approaches with colleagues. Thus, the findings show the development and potential of this self-selected group and may not generalize to non-volunteers. Indeed, the findings may generalize in very specific ways at different campuses. In seeking to understand why these faculty volunteered and why specific campuses were represented differently from others, the paper refers to the varying influences of the school context proposed by Clarke and Hollingsworth. The campus context may support or impede professional growth by influencing a faculty member's access to professional development opportunities, by offering incentives to participation, by creating a culture that values experimentation, and by providing supports for applying learning in the classroom. More data are needed in order to document linkages among campus factors and faculty TPACK.

Originality/value

This study is entirely original and has not been published elsewhere in whole or in part. Its intent is to guide education organizations in planning faculty development for mobile education programs.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Book part

Shawn Michael Bullock

This chapter is the result of an interest in the professional and research literature exploring the intersection between education and digital technology. Decades of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter is the result of an interest in the professional and research literature exploring the intersection between education and digital technology. Decades of research and press have largely focused on the ways in which particular devices might be productively used in the K-12 classroom. Educational radio, educational television, the computer, and more recently the tablet have all been framed as being valuable for supporting student learning. Critics such as Neil Selwyn have argued that research in educational technology needs to focus less on supporting particular devices and more on the nature of social interactions that are mediated, constrained, and enabled by various technological affordances.

Methodology/approach

This chapter reviews four theoretical frameworks in terms of their approach the social nature of the use of technology in education.

Findings

The chapter introduces a number of conceptual frameworks that are helpful for considering the social implications of using digital technologies to support the needs of diverse learners in a teacher education classroom.

Research implications

Scholars, especially who are also teacher educators can consider using and developing frameworks that are more robust for thinking about digital learning in education.

Originality/value

The value in this chapter lies in the critical conceptions explored and interrogated. The author demonstrates the complexity of teacher knowledge overlaid with technology.

Details

Exploring Pedagogies for Diverse Learners Online
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-672-0

Keywords

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