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1 – 10 of 185
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Abdelrahman Zuraik and Louise Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship among CEO transformational leadership, innovation climate and organizational innovation through exploration and…

5188

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship among CEO transformational leadership, innovation climate and organizational innovation through exploration and exploitation.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire, designed as a self-reported survey, was distributed to individuals working in teams in US-based corporations, with a collected sample size of 215 organizations.

Findings

Results show that CEO transformational leadership has a direct positive effect on organizational innovation and an indirect effect through innovation climate. CEO leadership is more impactful for exploitation, compared to innovation climate, which has more influence on exploration.

Research limitations/implications

This study is the first to integrate CEO transformational leadership and innovation climate with exploration and exploitation outcomes. A research limitation is that there is a higher percentage of female than male respondents and a lower of percentage of female CEOs in this study. A further limitation is self-report which can lead to common method bias.

Practical implications

The close connection among CEO transformational leadership, innovation climate and organizational innovation suggests that evaluating, supporting and training CEO transformational leadership becomes a vital activity for boards, investors and managers. If management wants to increase exploration, they should pay particular attention to creating a climate that is supportive of innovation. Organizations should recruit and train CEOs for transformational leadership and regularly assess climate to ensure innovation results.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is highlighting the role of innovation climate as a mediator between CEO transformational leadership and the outcome of organizational innovation which is measured by exploration and exploitation activities.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Gayle Kerr and Louise Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to benchmark the progress of integrated marketing communication (IMC) education, by replicating and extending a study on IMC education by Kerr (2009)…

4368

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to benchmark the progress of integrated marketing communication (IMC) education, by replicating and extending a study on IMC education by Kerr (2009). It documents progress, examines the impact of digital disruption and concludes with an agenda for change.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Delphi technique, this study recruited leading IMC educators and thought leaders internationally to find consensus on an important range of IMC issues, including its place within the university, the IMC brand, curriculum, impact on practice, the incorporation of digital and future challenges.

Findings

IMC has strengthened its place within the university and also within the minds and understanding of academics, students and industry. Digital disruption provides many challenges including updating curriculum and up skilling staff. It is vital, however, that IMC thinking be positioned as the integrator and digital as the facilitator, providing platforms to actualise IMC strategy such as content, customer service and cross-functional planning.

Practical implications

This study shows what IMC education has achieved since Kerr’s (2009) study. Further, it outlines what needs to be achieved in the future by providing a “To do” list for IMC educators.

Originality/value

It is vital that the development and progress of this important new area of study is tracked to ensure industry challenges are met, such as digital disruption, and the right education for IMC managers of the future is provided.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Yang Zhang, Juanita Trusty, Tatiana Goroshnikova, Louise Kelly, Kwok K. Kwong, Stephen J.J. McGuire, Juan Perusquia, Veena P. Prabhu, Minghao Shen and Robert Tang

The purpose of this study is to propose and test predictors of millennials’ social entrepreneurial intent (SEI), mediating mechanisms and influential contextual factors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose and test predictors of millennials’ social entrepreneurial intent (SEI), mediating mechanisms and influential contextual factors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes survey data from 1,890 respondents, 315 each from China, Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, Russia and the USA.

Findings

Empirical results show that social entrepreneurial self-efficacy (SESE) mediated the relationship between perseverance and proactive personality and the dependent variable SEI in all six countries. Life satisfaction positively moderated this relationship among US students and negatively moderated it among Chinese students. In China dissatisfaction appears to enhance SEI, while in the US satisfaction appears to do so.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the mediating role of SESE and the moderating role of life satisfaction when explaining SEI, as well as providing data from millennials in six countries.

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Abdelrahman Zuraik, Louise Kelly and Vernita Perkins

This study explores the impact of gender on team leadership style and how it impacts team innovation outcomes using the ambidexterity theory (opening and closing behaviors) of…

2010

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the impact of gender on team leadership style and how it impacts team innovation outcomes using the ambidexterity theory (opening and closing behaviors) of leadership for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 215 self-report surveys of team members were collected for hypothesis testing. This study tests whether team leader gender moderates the relationship between ambidextrous team leadership and team innovation.

Findings

Female team leaders are engaged in less opening behaviors of ideation, risk-taking and exploration than their male counterparts. Additionally, when female leaders engaged in closing behaviors, which include assigning roles and timelines, they had less impact than the closing behaviors of their male colleagues. Female team leaders were perceived as less effective in leading innovation than males.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the influence of gender on team leadership and innovation outcomes. There are drawbacks of cross-sectional data, sample selection issues and potential problems of percept–percept relationships.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that female team leads may need greater organizational support and organizational senior leadership support to take risks (opening behavior) to produce greater team innovation and increase leader visibility.

Social implications

Society can achieve even greater innovation outcomes by understanding and addressing the unique obstacles woman team leaders face with innovation. Organizations can benefit from innovation and resilience by supporting women team leaders in their diverse delivery of innovation.

Originality/value

This is the first study to look at the influence of gender and leadership on team innovation outcomes. Ambidextrous leadership theory provides insights into the specific challenges woman team leaders experience; however, so far no research has addressed the innovation outcome challenges female team leaders encounter. Since innovation and leadership can be a key component of visibility, compensation and promotion, it is necessary to investigate the challenges female team leads face in the innovation process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Louise Kelly and Marina Dorian

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to integrate two previously disparate areas of research: mindfulness and the entrepreneurial process. This present study conceptualizes the…

1057

Abstract

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to integrate two previously disparate areas of research: mindfulness and the entrepreneurial process. This present study conceptualizes the impact of mindfulness on the choices entrepreneurs face. Specifically, the research theorizes the positive effects of mindfulness on the opportunity recognition process, including evaluation of entrepreneurs. Furthermore, we propose that metacognition mediates this relationship, and emotional self-regulation moderates it. This conceptual research also suggests that mindfulness is positively related to the ethical decision-making and opportunity recognition and evaluation. Finally, compassion is proposed as a factor that mediates the relationship between mindfulness and ethical choices in opportunity recognition.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Paula Younger

980

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2023

Chloe Louise Williamson and Kelly Rayner-Smith

This paper aims to discuss the utility of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy as a treatment for children with intellectual disabilities (ID) who have…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the utility of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy as a treatment for children with intellectual disabilities (ID) who have experienced trauma.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance and literature were reviewed to provide support for the use of EMDR as a treatment for trauma in children with ID.

Findings

There is a growing body of evidence which demonstrates that EMDR therapy is successful for the treatment of trauma in adults and children. However, for children with ID, the research is limited despite those with ID being more likely than non-disabled peers to experience trauma such as abuse or neglect.

Practical implications

EMDR can only be facilitated by trained mental health nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists (clinical, forensic, counselling or educational) or occupational therapists or social workers with additional training. Finally, general practitioners who are experienced in psychotherapy or psychological trauma and have accreditation. Therefore, this highlights that there may be a lack of trained staff to facilitate this intervention and that those who are generally working with the client closely and long term such as learning disability nurses are not able to conduct this intervention.

Originality/value

This paper presents an account of NICE guidance and evidence of the efficacy of EMDR as a treatment for adults, children and those with ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Emma Louise Barrett, Zachary W. Adams, Erin V. Kelly, Natalie Peach, Rachel Hopkins, Bronwyn Milne, Sudie E. Back and Katherine L. Mills

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) frequently co-occur (PTSD+SUD). The onset of these disorders often occurs during adolescence. There is…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) frequently co-occur (PTSD+SUD). The onset of these disorders often occurs during adolescence. There is limited understanding of the perspectives of service providers working with this population. The purpose of this paper is to identify the practices, attitudes, experiences and training needs of Australian service providers treating adolescents with PTSD+SUD.

Design/methodology/approach

Service providers in Australia were invited to complete an anonymous online survey regarding their experiences working with adolescents who have PTSD+SUD. Ninety participants completed the 48-item survey that comprised multiple choice and open-ended questions.

Findings

Service providers estimated that up to 60 per cent of their adolescent clients with PTSD also have SUD. They identified case management, engaging with caregivers and difficult client emotions as specific challenges associated with working with this population. Despite this, providers rated treating PTSD+SUD as highly gratifying for reasons such as teaching new coping skills, developing expertise and assisting clients to achieve their goals. There were mixed perspectives on how to best treat adolescents with PTSD+SUD, and all participants identified a need for evidence-based resources specific to this population.

Originality/value

This is the first survey of Australian service providers working with adolescents who experience PTSD+SUD. The findings improve our understanding of the challenges and rewards associated with working with this population, and provide valuable information that can enhance clinical training and guide the development of new treatment approaches for this common and debilitating comorbidity.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Regina Kelly, Oliver McGarr, Louise Lehane and Sibel Erduran

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether or not females believe they associate with the culture of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by investigating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether or not females believe they associate with the culture of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by investigating the perceptions of female students currently enroled in STEM courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents data from a survey on female STEM students’ “Perspectives of women in STEM”, “Parents’ Science qualification”, “Supports in their STEM Course” and their “Science identify” through a social capital lens. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The main findings were that female STEM undergraduates believe social bias, balancing work and family life and lack of role models are the main cause of less women in STEM professions and leadership positions. There were statistically significant differences between how male and female students identified with certain traits, with less females claiming to be intelligent and know about latest discoveries than males.

Research limitations/implications

To eradicate stereotypical views of scientists, it is recommended that Irish higher-education institutions introduce initiatives to increase the socialisation of STEM females within female networks and develop female students’ self-awareness of their own capabilities. The expansion of STEM networks could act as a means to facilitate female students adopting positive science identities, increasing their science capital.

Originality/value

In Ireland, there is a paucity of literature relating to females’ experience of STEM in higher education. This paper provides evidence that despite their engagement with STEM, female undergraduate students subscribe to the stereotypical image of the scientist. This study highlights the need to change the culture experienced by female STEM undergraduates in Ireland so as to improve the experiences and trajectories of women in higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Kelly Amy Hine, Louise E. Porter and Janet Ransley

This paper explores the applicability of environmental theories to understanding patterns of police misconduct. In turn, it aims to offer a method for identifying prevention…

988

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the applicability of environmental theories to understanding patterns of police misconduct. In turn, it aims to offer a method for identifying prevention techniques that can be practically applied by policing agencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study empirically examined 84 substantiated matters of police misconduct in Queensland, Australia. The matters were content-analysed for elements of the first level of the crime triangle. These elements were then analysed to identify their relationships with the situational precipitators that initiated the misconduct; proactive misconduct and situational misconduct.

Findings

The two types of initiating misconduct had differing relationships with the crime triangle elements. Therefore, specific prevention techniques can be tailored by policing agencies to address and prevent each type of misconduct more successfully. The paper discusses these findings in terms of preventative measures according to the second preventative level of the crime triangle and situational crime prevention techniques.

Originality/value

This paper provides an alternative approach to understanding and preventing police misconduct by exploring the applicability of environmental theories. It finds that environmental theories offer a feasible approach for policing agencies to understand and tailor prevention of police misconduct in their jurisdictions.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 185