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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Khee Giap Tan and Sujata Kaur

The purpose of this paper is to use a newly developed Global Liveable Cities Index (GLCI), to assess how Abu Dhabi ranks among global cities. The paper sheds some light on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a newly developed Global Liveable Cities Index (GLCI), to assess how Abu Dhabi ranks among global cities. The paper sheds some light on the strengths and weaknesses associated with the city’s emergence as a global city, as identified by the index.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper makes use of a new measure of liveability – the GLCI – to rank the world ' s major cities. The GLCI advances the measurement of the “Liveability” construct by taking into account the multi-dimensional sensibility of diverse groups of ordinary persons across 64 cities. The paper also conducts policy simulations to help aid city planners invest in areas with low scores in the GLCI.

Findings

The results from the analysis show Abu Dhabi as a city that has a lot more potential than what most conventional city benchmarking exercises have revealed. It is a city with immense potential in the region by not just being the driver of growth but also being a nodal center for attraction of global talent. It is fast growing into a city of opportunity and already satisfies the characteristics of an emerging global city with a lot of regional attention. The empirical results also find that its potential has been clearly under-rated by many existing studies and indices primarily because of their narrow scope in measuring liveability. The GLCI results brought together multiple indicators to devise an index that is strongly based on a combination of analytical and philosophical values. Taking stock of the rankings of Abu Dhabi using the GLCI so far as well as the policy simulations, one can conclude that Abu Dhabi has multiple strengths as an aspiring global city. The results also indicate that one area that has been consistently identified as lacking in Abu Dhabi is that of environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

While cities have always played a historic role in powering economic growth in some form or the other, the scale of expansions and the speed at which it is happening today appears unprecedented. While a considerable number of indices benchmarking cities exist, they are rather narrow in scope. None of them model liveability from the perspective of an ordinary person with multi-dimensional sensibilities toward issues like economic well-being, social mobility, personal security, political governance, environmental sustainability and aesthetics for a more representative coverage of major cities around the world. These factors are critical measures of “liveability” of a city that in turn elevates it to the status of a global city. This paper thus makes an original contribution to the literature on understanding global cities by applying a newly developed GLCI to assess how Abu Dhabi ranks among global cities. The paper sheds some light on the strengths and weaknesses associated with the city’s emergence as a global city, as identified by the index.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Book part
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Zaheer Allam

Rapid urbanisation coupled with the increasing impacts from climate change adds numerous challenges to cities and countries. This renders difficulties for devising urban…

Abstract

Rapid urbanisation coupled with the increasing impacts from climate change adds numerous challenges to cities and countries. This renders difficulties for devising urban governance models that are resilient, safe and inclusive while preserving what is left of the environment. The issue of regenerating green spaces, while mitigating climate change, with an aim to increase sustainability has been the subject of numerous research studies, but there has been no country that has managed to achieve high levels of commitment and success than that of Singapore. This chapter reviews the approach of Singapore and shares insights on the techniques and key projects that have contributed to the uplifting of its liveability levels.

Details

Urban Governance and Smart City Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-104-2

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Zaheer Allam

Abstract

Details

Urban Governance and Smart City Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-104-2

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Khee Giap Tan, Tongxin NIE and Shinae Baek

This paper aims to apply a comprehensive Liveability Cities index to rank the liveability of 100 cities in the Greater China Region. Against the backdrop of the ongoing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply a comprehensive Liveability Cities index to rank the liveability of 100 cities in the Greater China Region. Against the backdrop of the ongoing trend of rapid and extensive urbanisation observed in China, “liveability” is being given an increasingly higher priority by the Chinese government. However, there has been no attempt to empirically measure this concept and to examine its nexus to the narrower concept of competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The index is based on 96 indicators across five environments, namely, economic vibrancy and competitiveness; environmental friendliness and sustainability; domestic security and stability; socio-cultural conditions; and political governance.

Findings

The empirical results show that Hong Kong, Macau and cities in Taiwan generally perform well in overall liveability rankings, while first-tier cities in mainland China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen) do not find a place among the top ranks.

Originality/value

The rankings and simulation exercise aim to provide Chinese policy makers with a framework to assess the liveability of China’s cities and suggests indicative policy suggestions that can be taken to improve overall liveability.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Khee Giap Tan, Hui Yin Chuah and Nguyen Trieu Duong Luu

Malaysia and Singapore had parted more than five decades ago. Much of the existing literature concerned about the bilateral ties between two economies focusing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Malaysia and Singapore had parted more than five decades ago. Much of the existing literature concerned about the bilateral ties between two economies focusing on the political economy perspective. This paper aims to provide insights on the economic development and prospects of Malaysia and Singapore at the national level. In addition, this paper also makes a pioneering attempt at conducting a comprehensive comparative analysis between Malaysia and Singapore at the city level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a case study of Malaysia and Singapore by assessing their national economic competitiveness, urban standards of living and quality of life. The paper leverages on a series of indices such as the competitiveness index for ASEAN-10, the cost of living, wages and purchasing power of ordinary residents, as well as the liveable cities index to perform the analysis.

Findings

In terms of national competitiveness, the analysis shows that Singapore and Malaysia have been leading the ASEAN region from 2000 onwards, being the top- and second-ranked, respectively. Malaysia still lags Singapore in several aspects such as attractiveness to foreign investors and standard of living, education and social stability despite insignificant differences in the ranking. City-level analysis shows that the cost of living in Singapore is almost double of that in Kuala Lumpur, although living in Singapore is more affordable owing to the higher wage rate received by the ordinary citizens.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature in several ways. First, this paper assesses economic development in Singapore and Malaysia instead of focusing on cross-straits relations. Second, the study reflects the view that the improvement of standards of living and quality of life for ordinary residents is paramount to economic development. The competitiveness index and city-level benchmarks used in the paper reflect the standards of living and the quality-of-life dimensions. Third, the focus on city-level analysis in addition to conventional national-level analysis helps to provide policymakers with practical policy implications against the backdrop of rapid urbanisation.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Erkan Kose, Danışment Vural and Gulcin Canbulut

This study has two main objectives: (1) to expand the application areas of grey system theory and (2) to select the most livable city in Turkey.

Abstract

Purpose

This study has two main objectives: (1) to expand the application areas of grey system theory and (2) to select the most livable city in Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

Choosing the most livable city is a complex problem that requires many criteria to be considered. It is important to select decision points according to which the criteria selection will be made and to what extent the criteria will affect the evaluation. For this purpose, a questionnaire was prepared to determine the criteria to be used in the assessment. The survey results were evaluated by the factor analysis (FA) and it was found that the criteria included in the survey were grouped under seven factors. Then, criteria weights were assigned to the determined criteria using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). At the last stage, Turkey's six most popular cities are graded using the grey relational analysis (GRA) to reduce the uncertainty existing in the process of evaluation.

Findings

The obtained results indicated that the most livable city in Turkey is Istanbul. Istanbul is followed by Izmir, Antalya, Eskisehir, Bursa and Ankara, respectively. Considering that Istanbul is a center of attraction in many respects, this result is not a surprise for many people. It is also observed that the results obtained overlap with similar studies in the literature.

Originality/value

Grey system theory and grey numbers have not been previously used to select the most livable city. With this aspect, this study has expanded the application of grey system theory and made an important contribution to the literature.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Joan Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meanings of walkability and relevance for tourism in modern Asian cities, including barriers to its implementation. Particular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meanings of walkability and relevance for tourism in modern Asian cities, including barriers to its implementation. Particular reference is made to conditions in the city state of Singapore and the manner in which urban planning and transport policies are influencing the tourist walking experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was selected as most suitable for the exercise accompanied by a literature review. Findings are derived from material in the public arena collected from a range of sources.

Findings

The government is shown to be actively pursuing policies to encourage both walking and cycling by residents as components of wider strategies directed at improving liveability. Several initiatives which positively affect the comfort and enjoyment of city walking by tourists are identified, but so too are Singapore’s shortcomings as a destination in which to walk. Balancing the demands on public space is a critical challenge for authorities.

Originality/value

The subject has been neglected within both an urban tourism and Asian city context and this paper illuminates aspects of significance pertaining to the concept and practice of walkability. Insights are afforded into factors which facilitate walkability and impediments to overcome.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Book part
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Zaheer Allam

This introductory chapter sets the scene by introducing the island city-state of Singapore from a historical standpoint and expands on its economical ascension as a result…

Abstract

This introductory chapter sets the scene by introducing the island city-state of Singapore from a historical standpoint and expands on its economical ascension as a result of its strong political governance structure. This chapter also highlights how the role of the urban form has gained from this perspective. Singapore's strategic geographic location played a pivotal part in boosting its role in trade, both regionally and internationally, hence enabling the country to assert a strong geopolitical position and grow economic stronghold. This helped the country to successfully invest in its urban fabric, and is now a world leader in regards to high liveability standards.

Details

Urban Governance and Smart City Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-104-2

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Elizelle J. Cilliers, Emma Diemont, Derk‐Jan Stobbelaar and Wim Timmermans

Amersfoort Local Municipality implemented the workbench spatial quality method (referred to as workbench method) to enhance participation in green‐planning processes.

Abstract

Purpose

Amersfoort Local Municipality implemented the workbench spatial quality method (referred to as workbench method) to enhance participation in green‐planning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of the Valuing Attractive Landscapes in the Urban Economy project (made possible by INTERREG IVB North West Europe, European Regional Development Fund, European Territorial Cooperation, 2007‐2013), the method was evaluated based on its contribution to three core issues: understanding the value of green spaces; identifying these values; and planning for the enhancement of thereof.

Findings

Based on case studies conducted in Amersfoort, The Netherlands, this interactive method invites people to think about the use and experience values of spatial aspects and rate them according to importance and vulnerability. The method focuses on participatory planning and quality identification.

Research limitations/implications

Assessment of the value of green space will differ between users, experts and between locations.

Practical implications

Meaningful participation processes enhance the sustainability and feasibility of urban development projects, as it captures the real use values and enhances green‐planning initiatives.

Social implications

The workbench method is a communication tool that enhances social perspectives, social responsibility and awareness of values.

Originality/value

The workbench method stresses the need for participatory processes and the added value that these processes can have on urban development and future green‐planning initiatives. It furthermore identifies adequate ways of approaching participation to ensure successful implementation thereof. The workbench method report 2009 as compiled by the University of Applied Sciences Van Hall Larenstein contains all details and data of the study evaluating the workbench method in terms of stakeholder identification and level of involvement of these stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Sara María Torres Outón

The purpose of this paper is to explore, through the analysis case, how the revitalization of a historic centre has been carried out and the role of tourism in this process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore, through the analysis case, how the revitalization of a historic centre has been carried out and the role of tourism in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study area is well-documented as there has been extensive fieldwork on the transformation of the commercial sector in the Monumental Zone of Pontevedra in the last three decades. In order to prepare this paper, a bibliographic review, in-depth interviews, premises registration data and population data have been used.

Findings

The findings show that the processes of change and revitalization do not conform to a single reality common to all historical centres, although similar strategies are developed, the role of the participating actors and, especially, the idiosyncrasy of these spaces change the outcomes. On the one hand, gentrification does not occur and the increase of residential uses is still a goal. On the other hand, the tourism strategy brings more visitors and complements the commerce activity and attraction.

Social implications

The new challenge of these spaces, and the urban contribution from this research, is that in the appropriation of space by citizens, tourism may be a complement for commerce, and shops and hospitality (facilities) make these spaces more livable. Although tourism does not necessarily increase the number of residents, the revenue from tourism may prevent the reoccurrence of abandonment.

Originality/value

The paper focusses on both gentrification and touristification; processes that have led to the substitution of residents and activities and the conflict with the local population and the normalization of urban life. This case has been selected because despite a seemingly successful revitalization process, recently some old threats seem to be returning.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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