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Article

Laurent Tournois

Cities from developing countries strive to compete on a global scale and hence try to attract and retain their residents in offering higher liveability. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Cities from developing countries strive to compete on a global scale and hence try to attract and retain their residents in offering higher liveability. The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which liveability influences resident’s sense of place and determines residents’ behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out to test the hypotheses using a sample of 362 residents from the city of Dubai (United Arab Emirates). Structural equation modelling and the method suggested by Hayes and Preacher (2010) for mediation analysis were used.

Findings

Findings show that residents’ preferences for different types of liveability attributes (included in seven dimensions) influence their sense of place that in return shapes their behavioural intentions towards their place of residence. Results also reveal the importance of non-economic attributes of the urban environment. Moreover, residents’ sense of place mediates the relationship between liveability and residents’ behavioural intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could more deeply investigate the social functioning of a place and particularly the role of place identity, as it is recognized to affect residents’ attitudes and behaviours. In addition, further developments may contribute to the ongoing debate on the relationship between liveability and growth.

Practical implications

From a public policy standpoint, this study suggests that local authorities need to identify a distinct set of economic and non-economic characteristics that will encourage residents to stay longer in the place they live. As such, enhancing liveability represents a critical strategic initiative for cities from developing countries to make them a great place to live.

Originality/value

Compared to developed countries’ cities, few attempts have been made to investigate the attitudes of residents towards a place and the role of liveability in the context of emerging countries fast-growing urban areas. In addition, findings revealed the importance of place-based meanings, i.e. sense of place, which played a pivotal role in the development of place-protective behaviours.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article

Khee Giap Tan, Tongxin NIE and Shinae Baek

This paper aims to apply a comprehensive Liveability Cities index to rank the liveability of 100 cities in the Greater China Region. Against the backdrop of the ongoing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply a comprehensive Liveability Cities index to rank the liveability of 100 cities in the Greater China Region. Against the backdrop of the ongoing trend of rapid and extensive urbanisation observed in China, “liveability” is being given an increasingly higher priority by the Chinese government. However, there has been no attempt to empirically measure this concept and to examine its nexus to the narrower concept of competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The index is based on 96 indicators across five environments, namely, economic vibrancy and competitiveness; environmental friendliness and sustainability; domestic security and stability; socio-cultural conditions; and political governance.

Findings

The empirical results show that Hong Kong, Macau and cities in Taiwan generally perform well in overall liveability rankings, while first-tier cities in mainland China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen) do not find a place among the top ranks.

Originality/value

The rankings and simulation exercise aim to provide Chinese policy makers with a framework to assess the liveability of China’s cities and suggests indicative policy suggestions that can be taken to improve overall liveability.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Cheryl Jones and David Newsome

Rankings of the world's cities by a liveability factor have become increasingly significant in the media, among governments and city councils in the promotion of cities…

Abstract

Purpose

Rankings of the world's cities by a liveability factor have become increasingly significant in the media, among governments and city councils in the promotion of cities, as well as academics interested in understanding the impact of quantifying liveability on urban planning and the relationship of liveability indices and tourism. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

While examining characteristics of liveable cities according to some of the widely reported liveability indices, such as those produced by Mercer, Monocle magazine and the Economic Intelligence Unit (EIU), the authors provide a snapshot of Perth as a liveable city and consider liveability in relation to urban tourism, sustainability and environment. Perth's liveability ranking is discussed in terms of environmental sustainability, noting that for Perth to retain its position as one of the world's most liveable cities, consideration must be given to sustainable planning and environmental practices at policy, organisational and individual levels, placing the long-term liveability of the environment and Perth's flora and fauna at the forefront of urban, and tourism, planning.

Findings

The accessibility of nature in Perth and its surrounds, its outdoor recreational opportunities and warm climate are factors that make it unique. Developing and promoting nature-based tourism would further enhance the accessibility of nature for visitors and residents. While Perth's EIU top ten ranking is justified, its major attributes remain unrecognised by the widely used EIU liveable city assessment framework.

Research limitations/implications

Moreover, the notion of a liveable city is open to contention due to the subjective nature of various assessment criteria. Liveability indices should include quantifiable environmental factors such as green space, remnant vegetation, biodiversity, air quality and unpolluted water.

Originality/value

This paper thus contributes to the discourse on what constitutes a liveable city, the authors emphasise that liveability is significantly related to the presence of green space and natural areas as well as the opportunity to see and interact with wildlife. Perth has such opportunities for it residents and visitors but as yet the aforementioned natural characteristics are not implicit in international measures of liveability.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article

Fodei M. Conteh and Derya Oktay

With increasing urbanisation in developing countries and the concomitant overcrowding on streets, serious questions remain about the liveability of inner-city…

Abstract

With increasing urbanisation in developing countries and the concomitant overcrowding on streets, serious questions remain about the liveability of inner-city residential-commercial streets. This paper contends that lively streets are not necessarily liveable streets. Liveability is defined by other criteria that take cognizance of human comfort and capabilities within living environments. Observations suggest an uneasy relationship between a crowded public space and the private residential spaces that sit next to them. The paper’s focus is to measure the liveability of a lively but overcrowded street and how its everyday use affects the physical characteristics of buildings, the activities, and the wellbeing of residents. Employing a mixed-method strategy, the study draws on observations, semi-structured interviews, and questionnaire survey of residents, shopkeepers, and street traders. The findings suggest that an overcrowded street space has a negative effect on the liveability and quality of living of residents and other users but that this is tempered by intra-dependency amongst the users and the negotiation of the rights accruing to all as individuals and as groups.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article

Khee Giap Tan and Sujata Kaur

The purpose of this paper is to use a newly developed Global Liveable Cities Index (GLCI), to assess how Abu Dhabi ranks among global cities. The paper sheds some light on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a newly developed Global Liveable Cities Index (GLCI), to assess how Abu Dhabi ranks among global cities. The paper sheds some light on the strengths and weaknesses associated with the city’s emergence as a global city, as identified by the index.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper makes use of a new measure of liveability – the GLCI – to rank the world ' s major cities. The GLCI advances the measurement of the “Liveability” construct by taking into account the multi-dimensional sensibility of diverse groups of ordinary persons across 64 cities. The paper also conducts policy simulations to help aid city planners invest in areas with low scores in the GLCI.

Findings

The results from the analysis show Abu Dhabi as a city that has a lot more potential than what most conventional city benchmarking exercises have revealed. It is a city with immense potential in the region by not just being the driver of growth but also being a nodal center for attraction of global talent. It is fast growing into a city of opportunity and already satisfies the characteristics of an emerging global city with a lot of regional attention. The empirical results also find that its potential has been clearly under-rated by many existing studies and indices primarily because of their narrow scope in measuring liveability. The GLCI results brought together multiple indicators to devise an index that is strongly based on a combination of analytical and philosophical values. Taking stock of the rankings of Abu Dhabi using the GLCI so far as well as the policy simulations, one can conclude that Abu Dhabi has multiple strengths as an aspiring global city. The results also indicate that one area that has been consistently identified as lacking in Abu Dhabi is that of environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

While cities have always played a historic role in powering economic growth in some form or the other, the scale of expansions and the speed at which it is happening today appears unprecedented. While a considerable number of indices benchmarking cities exist, they are rather narrow in scope. None of them model liveability from the perspective of an ordinary person with multi-dimensional sensibilities toward issues like economic well-being, social mobility, personal security, political governance, environmental sustainability and aesthetics for a more representative coverage of major cities around the world. These factors are critical measures of “liveability” of a city that in turn elevates it to the status of a global city. This paper thus makes an original contribution to the literature on understanding global cities by applying a newly developed GLCI to assess how Abu Dhabi ranks among global cities. The paper sheds some light on the strengths and weaknesses associated with the city’s emergence as a global city, as identified by the index.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Book part

Zaheer Allam

Rapid urbanisation coupled with the increasing impacts from climate change adds numerous challenges to cities and countries. This renders difficulties for devising urban…

Abstract

Rapid urbanisation coupled with the increasing impacts from climate change adds numerous challenges to cities and countries. This renders difficulties for devising urban governance models that are resilient, safe and inclusive while preserving what is left of the environment. The issue of regenerating green spaces, while mitigating climate change, with an aim to increase sustainability has been the subject of numerous research studies, but there has been no country that has managed to achieve high levels of commitment and success than that of Singapore. This chapter reviews the approach of Singapore and shares insights on the techniques and key projects that have contributed to the uplifting of its liveability levels.

Details

Urban Governance and Smart City Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-104-2

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Article

Khee Giap Tan, Hui Yin Chuah and Nguyen Trieu Duong Luu

Malaysia and Singapore had parted more than five decades ago. Much of the existing literature concerned about the bilateral ties between two economies focusing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Malaysia and Singapore had parted more than five decades ago. Much of the existing literature concerned about the bilateral ties between two economies focusing on the political economy perspective. This paper aims to provide insights on the economic development and prospects of Malaysia and Singapore at the national level. In addition, this paper also makes a pioneering attempt at conducting a comprehensive comparative analysis between Malaysia and Singapore at the city level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a case study of Malaysia and Singapore by assessing their national economic competitiveness, urban standards of living and quality of life. The paper leverages on a series of indices such as the competitiveness index for ASEAN-10, the cost of living, wages and purchasing power of ordinary residents, as well as the liveable cities index to perform the analysis.

Findings

In terms of national competitiveness, the analysis shows that Singapore and Malaysia have been leading the ASEAN region from 2000 onwards, being the top- and second-ranked, respectively. Malaysia still lags Singapore in several aspects such as attractiveness to foreign investors and standard of living, education and social stability despite insignificant differences in the ranking. City-level analysis shows that the cost of living in Singapore is almost double of that in Kuala Lumpur, although living in Singapore is more affordable owing to the higher wage rate received by the ordinary citizens.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature in several ways. First, this paper assesses economic development in Singapore and Malaysia instead of focusing on cross-straits relations. Second, the study reflects the view that the improvement of standards of living and quality of life for ordinary residents is paramount to economic development. The competitiveness index and city-level benchmarks used in the paper reflect the standards of living and the quality-of-life dimensions. Third, the focus on city-level analysis in addition to conventional national-level analysis helps to provide policymakers with practical policy implications against the backdrop of rapid urbanisation.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Logistics Systems for Sustainable Cities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044260-0

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Article

Mahmoud Al Saeed and Raffaello Furlan

West Bay, the Business District of Doha, the capital city of the State of Qatar, is facing an urban regeneration phase due to the construction of the West Bay Central…

Abstract

Purpose

West Bay, the Business District of Doha, the capital city of the State of Qatar, is facing an urban regeneration phase due to the construction of the West Bay Central Train Station, a four-storey underground building hosting the intersection of two metro lines – one long-distance train and one people mover. The development of the transit village, or transit-oriented development, is raising concerns related to the need to enhance liveability (as urban quality of life) and sense of place (considering the local cultural identity). The purpose of this paper is to investigate existing urban elements, such as transit stations, as well as their impact on the liveability and identity of the place and to define a comprehensive urban regeneration strategy for the development of the distinctive urban village of West Bay.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis and data collection were based on the type of data as tangible aspects which mainly include the physical, and aspects such as diversity, density, connectivity, transportation systems and public realm. Intangible factors are concluded from close and direct site observation, semi-structured in-depth interviews, as a face-to-face type of data collection with key persons in Qatar Rail, the Ministry of the Municipality and public work authorities, where the intangible aspects were briefed by economic aspects, environmental situation, social pattern and human behaviours. After siting the base ground of theoretical knowledge and site condition analysis, the authors identified a group of key factors that respond to the targeted (tangible and intangible) aspects and threats, to propose a design treatment for the site threats and highlighted issues in addition to a group of recommendations and design strategies (Charmaz, 2006; Marshall and Rossman, 2010).

Findings

From the data analysis of the site and by revisiting the literature review, a group of recommendations are formulated. The authors divided the recommendations into two types according to their method of application. The first is the design approach, where the authors propose integrated design proposals to tackle and solve the highlighted issues from the findings of site analysis (diversity, density, connectivity in addition to economic, social and environmental factors). Meanwhile, the second part represents the systematic recommendations that should be adopted and implemented to enhance the existing situation and form a guideline for further developments.

Research limitations/implications

This research study could be further expanded to urban planning, urban design, social development and environmental engineering. Urban design and social development chiefly focus on the relationship between built and unbuilt forms with an eye to creating healthy, sustainable communities for current and future generations.

Originality/value

Because issues of social sustainability and urban design have failed to attract suitable levels of attention from local scholars, gaps have arisen in the research. Accordingly, this research study investigates the relationship between social sustainability and urban design standards in the State of Qatar with an eye to translating theoretical knowledge into applicable principles of urban planning. In doing so, it will help close the gaps in knowledge related to Qatar and GCC countries.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Urban Transport and the Environment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-047029-0

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