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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Lisa Holmes and Samantha McDermid

In England in recent years, concerns have been raised about the proportion of time social workers and other frontline children's social care practitioners spend carrying out…

Abstract

Purpose

In England in recent years, concerns have been raised about the proportion of time social workers and other frontline children's social care practitioners spend carrying out desk‐based, administrative activities. This article aims to report time use activity data from front line workers on the amount of time spent on different activities to support children in need (as defined by the 1989 Children Act).

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from a range of sources including focus groups, event records (diaries completed by practitioners) and online surveys.

Findings

The proportion of time spent on direct and indirect activities varies according to the types of process. Those associated with ongoing support have the highest proportion of direct activity, whereas those associated with decision making, especially if a one‐off activity, have the highest proportion of administrative activities. The greater the needs of the child, the more direct and indirect support was given, but there was some variation across social work teams. But the activities of social workers are interconnected, making it difficult to provide conclusive evidence, but the concern about the imbalance between direct work and administrative tasks seems justified.

Research implications/limitations

The findings highlight the complexity of exploring how social workers spend their time and how the proportion of time spent on direct and indirect activities is determined by the needs and circumstances of children and their families.

Practical implications

Wider contextual practice issues are also explored including the recent increases in referrals to children's social care and the use of electronic recording systems.

Originality/value

The breakdown of the activities using the approach outlined in the article increases transparency in understanding how social workers spend their time.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Lisa Holmes and Tina May Ward

Describes the steps taken to develop the national award‐winning community‐based project. HeartWell is built on the formation of alliances and commitment of key players from…

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Abstract

Describes the steps taken to develop the national award‐winning community‐based project. HeartWell is built on the formation of alliances and commitment of key players from health, local government and voluntary organizations. The whole project was developed as a result of, and in response to, local coronary heart disease (CHD) research which identifies the health authority covered as having one of the highest mortality rates from CHD in England. Some of the food‐related projects are described to highlight the significance of food in relation to promoting positive heart health at a community‐based level. Utilizes qualitative and quantitative data in the evaluation of process and intermediate outcomes of the project, a key focus being the effectiveness of alliance partnerships and community involvement in the successful delivery of health initiatives.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2023

Bethany Holmes and Lisa Ogilvie

The purpose of this paper is to examine recovery through lived experience. It is part of a series that explores candid accounts of addiction and recovery to identify important…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine recovery through lived experience. It is part of a series that explores candid accounts of addiction and recovery to identify important components in the recovery process.

Design/methodology/approach

The G-CHIME model comprises six elements important to addiction recovery (growth, connectedness, hope, identity, meaning in life and empowerment). It provides a standard to against which to consider addiction recovery, having been used in this series, as well as in the design of interventions that improve well-being and strengthen recovery. In this paper, a first-hand account is presented, followed by a semi-structured e-interview with the author of the account. Narrative analysis is used to explore the account and interview through the G-CHIME model.

Findings

This paper shows that addiction recovery is a remarkable process that can be effectively explained using the G-CHIME model. The significance of each component in the model is apparent from the account and e-interview presented.

Originality/value

Each account of recovery in this series is unique, and as yet, untold.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Gonzalo Lizarralde, Holmes Páez, Adriana Lopez, Oswaldo Lopez, Lisa Bornstein, Kevin Gould, Benjamin Herazo and Lissette Muñoz

Few people living in informal settlements in the Global South spontaneously claim that they are “resilient” or “adapting” to disaster risk or climate change. Surely, they often…

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Abstract

Purpose

Few people living in informal settlements in the Global South spontaneously claim that they are “resilient” or “adapting” to disaster risk or climate change. Surely, they often overcome multiple challenges, including natural hazards exacerbated by climate change. Yet their actions are increasingly examined through the framework of resilience, a notion developed in the North, and increasingly adopted in the South. To what extent eliminate’ do these initiatives correspond to the concepts that scholars and authorities place under the resilience framework?

Design/methodology/approach

Three longitudinal case studies in Yumbo, Salgar and San Andrés (Colombia) serve to investigate narratives of disaster risks and responses to them. Methods include narrative analysis from policy and project documents, presentations, five workshops, six focus groups and 24 interviews.

Findings

The discourse adopted by most international scholars and local authorities differs greatly from that used by citizens to explain risk and masks the politics involved in disaster reduction and the search for social justice. Besides, narratives of social change, aspirations and social status are increasingly masked in disaster risk explanations. Tensions are also concealed, including those regarding the winners and losers of interventions and the responsibilities for disaster risk reduction.

Originality/value

Our findings confirm previous results that have shown that the resilience framework contributes to “depoliticize” the analysis of risk and serves to mask and dilute the responsibility of political and economic elites in disaster risk creation. But they also show that resilience fails to explain the type of socioeconomic change that is required to reduce vulnerabilities in Latin America.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lisa L. Heuvel

Abstract

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lisa L. Heuvel

This chapter presents performance pedagogy as an interdisciplinary construct and potential bridge between history-based performance and classroom teaching. This chapter proposes…

Abstract

This chapter presents performance pedagogy as an interdisciplinary construct and potential bridge between history-based performance and classroom teaching. This chapter proposes Living History in the Classroom: Performance and Pedagogy's central theme: that storytelling and historical interpretation are effective teaching tools. These techniques are integral at many public history settings for on-site and outreach education; Freeman Tilden's foundational 1957 interpretive guidelines for America's national parks paired engagement with education and still influence the public history field. Yet, a review of related literature suggests that limited attention has been paid to translating these techniques for educators' use, whether as performers, as mentors for their students, or in collaborating with historic sites. The pedagogy inherent in storytelling and interpretive performance aligns with their potential instructional value, as has been documented for educator's performance pedagogy in the arts. Similarly, the continuing need to engage current and new audiences impacts how these organizations conduct educational programs and visitor attractions. In the same respect, PK-16 educators and administrators consistently seek best practices for engaging today's Generation Z students (born between 1997 and 2012) and the generation that follows, termed Generation Alpha (McCrindle, 2020). This chapter features a performance pedagogy model that combines historical and instructional objectives that draw from research and observation of first-person interpreters performing in teacher professional development workshops and the author's personal instructional and interpretive experience. This chapter contains a related interview with a noted historian-performer and for educators' use, a worksheet with guiding questions to create or analyze a historical character, educational content, related pedagogy, and key aspects of a performance.

Details

Living History in the Classroom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-596-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Rebecca Checkley, Nick Hodge, Sue Chantler, Lisa Reidy and Katie Holmes

This paper focuses on accessing the experiences of three boys who are on the autism spectrum to identify what using a voice output communication aid (VOCA), within a classroom…

Abstract

This paper focuses on accessing the experiences of three boys who are on the autism spectrum to identify what using a voice output communication aid (VOCA), within a classroom setting, means to them. The methods used to identify the boys' perspectives are described and evaluated. Establishing these through direct methods of engagement proved problematic but working with parents and school staff as ‘expert guides’ provided a rich insight into what using a VOCA appeared to mean to the boys. The findings suggest that using a computer‐based VOCA can be viewed by children with autism as a pleasurable and motivating activity. This technology also seems to offer the potential for a much broader developmental impact for these children than that currently recognised within the research literature.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2023

Lisa Ogilvie and Jerome Carson

Abstract

Details

Stories of Addiction Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-550-7

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