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1 – 10 of over 307000

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-872-8

Abstract

Details

Transport Survey Quality and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044096-5

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Nicola J. Beatson, Paul de Lange and Heinrich Oosthuizen

Students have a finite amount of time that they can allocate between commitments of study–work–life. Striking a balance between these competing activities is an individual…

Abstract

Purpose

Students have a finite amount of time that they can allocate between commitments of study–work–life. Striking a balance between these competing activities is an individual conundrum and this study aims to explore the impact of extramural activities and paid employment on the academic performance of accounting students.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by Carroll’s model of school learning, the authors adopt a quantitative approach where they survey (N = 264) and gather responses (n = 195) from students with respect to their choices regarding spare time outside study. These perceptions are then compared to their academic performance. Quantitative responses were subsequently triangulated with interview findings to provide in-depth analysis.

Findings

Findings provide greater understanding for educators of the student lived experience, which reveals that the work, study and life balance is individually nuanced and is largely driven by the individual’s perceived level of interference from work, which is a significant predictor of academic performance.

Originality/value

Analysis of the determinants of student learning includes prior academic achievement, confidence with numbers, critical thinking, gender and prior accounting knowledge. Yet, little is known about the implication of activities outside the formal curriculum. This study addresses this void in the literature and provides a much-needed link back to accounting faculty’s pedagogical approaches as they adapt to a cohort’s learning behaviour. This study also adds to the debate on the need for more discussion with faculty to allow alternate arrangements based on extramural activities and employment commitments. Greater understanding of study–work–life balance for students provides an opportunity for new dialog between faculty and students.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1964

THERE have been official links for the past twelve years between the Institute of Incorporated Work Study Technologists and Time and Motion Study. Many of its members have…

Abstract

THERE have been official links for the past twelve years between the Institute of Incorporated Work Study Technologists and Time and Motion Study. Many of its members have been valued contributors to our pages and the Institute has had editorial space for its news.

Details

Work Study, vol. 13 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1955

THE possibility of Work Study practitioners investigating lost industrial time through gambling is not to be ruled out in the future. This possibility arises from the…

Abstract

THE possibility of Work Study practitioners investigating lost industrial time through gambling is not to be ruled out in the future. This possibility arises from the question of the Secretary of the Churches' Committee on Gambling, who recently asked in effect: “Can lost production and efficiency through gambling be measured?” Presumably, no‐one has ever informed the Reverend Secretary that every form of industrial inefficiency can be measured. Let us hasten to inform the Committee, therefore, that, if the necessity should arise, the tools are ready to be applied.

Details

Work Study, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1985

IN A RECENT issue of New Scientist a letter was from a graduate (or should it be graduette, for she was a girl) who said she was writing on behalf of many unemployed…

Abstract

IN A RECENT issue of New Scientist a letter was from a graduate (or should it be graduette, for she was a girl) who said she was writing on behalf of many unemployed graduates; and she posed a ‘Catch 22’ query. What she wanted to know how anyone could obtain the experience needed to gain a job if no one will give such a person a job to get the experience?

Details

Work Study, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1955

WE desire to draw special attention to an article appearing in this issue, entitled “Materials Handling and Work Study”—it is of special significance to production…

Abstract

WE desire to draw special attention to an article appearing in this issue, entitled “Materials Handling and Work Study”—it is of special significance to production engineers. And the reason for this special significance is, not only that production engineers tend to neglect this most important field of industrial activity, but also that they show an appalling lack of “know‐how” in the attainment of efficient materials handling procedures.

Details

Work Study, vol. 4 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1961

FOR the tenth time our American counterpart, the Industrial Management Society, is holding a contest for methods improvement. The brochure giving the rules shows how…

Abstract

FOR the tenth time our American counterpart, the Industrial Management Society, is holding a contest for methods improvement. The brochure giving the rules shows how thoroughly such a project is undertaken. Its main purpose is to stimulate interest in cost reduction through improved ways of doing something, although the mere replacement of obsolete equipment by new plant which is commercially available is not considered to fall within the ambit of the competition.

Details

Work Study, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1964

BECAUSE productivity means profitability it is the aim of any manufacturing organization. Too often productivity is thought to be the same thing as increased production…

Abstract

BECAUSE productivity means profitability it is the aim of any manufacturing organization. Too often productivity is thought to be the same thing as increased production. In reality it is very different. The way to increase production is fairly obvious. More machinery is obtained, larger quantities of raw materials are purchased and more workers are engaged. If, for example, these three essentials are doubled production should be twice as much. Production has increased, but if it has not succeeded in lowering the price of whatever is being manufactured what has been gained?

Details

Work Study, vol. 13 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Jim Hlavac, Jim Peterson and Matthew Piscioneri

The primary purpose of this paper is to compare time availability and its allocation amongst Arts students. In addition it aims to match time availability and use with…

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Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this paper is to compare time availability and its allocation amongst Arts students. In addition it aims to match time availability and use with informants' resource preferences and the variables of language background and residential status.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 109 students completed quantitatively‐based electronic and paper‐copy surveys. Empirical data from primary informants form the basis of analysis.

Findings

The paper finds that over 90 per cent of informants have non‐study commitments and over half have commitments of six or more hours per week. The largest single group (35 per cent) has obligations of six to 14 hours per week. There is only a weak correlation between a higher number of commitments a lower amount of “out‐of‐class” time to engage with study obligations. Conversely, fewer extra‐curricular obligations does not automatically lead to a higher number of hours devoted to study. Differences in resource use are small: paper copy resources are universally popular, regardless of time commitments and allocations. Non‐English‐speaking background and international students tend to have fewer non‐study commitments and devote more time to study in general than English‐speaking background and local informants.

Research limitations/implications

Research covers one of full‐time student informants' four units and does not elicit responses from all units studied by informants.

Originality/value

While employment has been examined as a factor affecting student performance and time availability, few studies have matched time availability and declared time allocations to study. Further, time availability as a key feature of academic study is matched against variables highly relevant to today's student populations: resource mode use; language background; and residential status.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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