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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

O. Petkova and D. Petkov

The research aims to show that validation and legitimisation of an information systems (IS) project need to be treated simultaneously to improve software project…

Abstract

The research aims to show that validation and legitimisation of an information systems (IS) project need to be treated simultaneously to improve software project management. A starting assumption is that traditional aspects of model validity and legitimisation in operational research can be applicable to the field of IS. However, non‐traditional types of IS are more suitable to be viewed from an interpretive viewpoint. Validation is explored both from hard systems and also from soft systems point of view. Some extensions on the notion of validation for soft systems are provided for that purpose. Issues regarding both validation and legitimisation in IS are illustrated on a case study regarding the management of an academic research management IS project. Issues related both validation and legitimisation in IS are illustrated on a case study regarding the management of an academic research IS project. The latter had eventually to be abandoned. The case study shows how the non‐adherence to the principles of validation and legitimisation lead to that situation.

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Kybernetes, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Rodney McAdam

Increased developments in competition, globalisation and technology have led to an increased emphasis on innovation in organisations and academia. There is a substantial…

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Abstract

Purpose

Increased developments in competition, globalisation and technology have led to an increased emphasis on innovation in organisations and academia. There is a substantial body of knowledge in regard to the concept of innovation. However, there is a need to make a distinction between innovation and the implementation of innovation in organisations. The study of innovation implementation is much less defined in regard to theory and practice. The aim of this paper is to develop a theoretical conception of innovation implementation primarily based on a critique of the literature. The development is intended to inform further research and enable organisations to develop pathways for effective implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual and integrated framework is developed from the literature. The constructs of normalising, legitimising and conflict are used to develop the theory.

Findings

It is shown how conflict or abrasion is a key element of innovation implementation in attempting to overcome normalising and legitimising organisational forces. Moreover, it is contended that conflict can be used to assess innovation implementation.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of theory building at multiple levels within organisations in relation to innovation implementation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

George Frederick Nel and Pieter Van Aardt Van der Spuy

The study explores the use of professional investor relations (IR) practices in South African (SA) listed companies to understand which theories may be responsible for…

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores the use of professional investor relations (IR) practices in South African (SA) listed companies to understand which theories may be responsible for IR's adoption and growth in South Africa, an emerging economy. Therefore, this study evaluates shareholder value maximisation, stakeholder and legitimization theory and institutional isomorphism theory as possible theories to explain professional IR behaviour in SA listed companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design is qualitative and exploratory, based on a questionnaire developed and sent to all companies listed on the Johannesburg Securities Exchange (JSE).

Findings

The results indicate evidence of isomorphic spread to SA environments from practices observed in the UK and the USA, which we find are mostly performed to promote shareholder interests. The data suggest some evidence that the communication needs of black economic empowerment and environmental, social and governance (ESG) investors are given priority, suggesting the utility of professional IR to obtain legitimisation from society. Contrary to expectation is that social media communication channels are not extensively used.

Practical implications

The descriptive nature of this study may be valuable to IR practitioners to improve SA IR practises, while neglected legitimisation opportunities with regard to the needs of ESG and black economic empowerment shareholders may be fruitfully addressed by practitioners.

Originality/value

This study innovates in its use of legitimisation theory and isomorphism theory to develop the study's expectations. Social problems provide contextual elements unique to SA which provides a good opportunity to test the expectation of legitimisation theory's influence on professional IR practices.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Sameer Prasad, James Jaffe, Kuntal Bhattacharyya, Jasmine Tata and Donna Marshall

Billions of entrepreneurs at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) operate as small-scale producers within multi-tiered supply chain networks. Unfortunately, a majority of these…

Abstract

Purpose

Billions of entrepreneurs at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) operate as small-scale producers within multi-tiered supply chain networks. Unfortunately, a majority of these entrepreneurs are simply unable to derive sufficient value from the network and are vulnerable to disasters and poverty. The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology that examines dynamic and triadic power relationships in order to create value chains for BoP producers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds upon the available literature and a relevant historical case study to develop a typology. The validity of the typology is ascertained by examining and comparing two current BoP silk weaver communities in India.

Findings

The typology captures essential environmental variables and relates them to mediated and non-mediated forms of power which, in turn, shape the value derived from the supply chain network.

Practical implications

The typology provides specific recommendations for BoP producers, such as the formation of cooperatives, engaging in political unionization and ensuring that their social networks expand beyond local communities.

Originality/value

The typology brings together structuration theory and power and provides a framework for understanding supply value. This typology is generalizable to dynamic multi-tiered supply chain networks.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2018

Warren Maroun

The purpose of this study is to examine how social disclosures by one of the world’s largest producers of Platinum Group Metals are used to maintain and repair legitimacy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how social disclosures by one of the world’s largest producers of Platinum Group Metals are used to maintain and repair legitimacy in the context of South Africa’s prevailing socio-economic conditions and in response to the immediate challenge to legitimacy posed by violent worker demonstrations taking place at its operations in Marikana during August 2012. This is done to highlight how legitimacy strategies take account of the temporal characteristics of a threat to legitimacy and how these, in turn, may constrain the need for far-reaching organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

Suchman’s (1995) outline of legitimacy theory and Laughlin’s (1991) model of organisational change provide a frame of reference for a detailed thematic content analysis which identifies the use of different strategies by an organization to respond to threats to its credibility and how these impact, resulting changes to business philosophies, policies and systems.

Findings

The study highlights the temporal dimension of legitimisation strategies. Social-related disclosures provided by the case entity in response to labour unrest are aimed at addressing both the episodic and continual threat to legitimacy resulting from the unfavourable event. These also have the effect of limiting the extent of internal changes to select business policies and sub-systems. Carefully managing legitimacy allows the case entity to avoid the need to reformulate its business ethos.

Research limitations/implications

The study deals only with a single case organisation. Although the emphasis is on highlighting themes and principles, results are not necessarily applicable in different contexts. Related to this, although the study deals with a major South African mining company, it does not prove the relevance of local cultural differences to the legitimisation process.

Originality/value

The study dispenses with the use of proxies, such as frequencies of disclosures, to demonstrate how organisations use non-financial reporting to secure legitimacy. Instead, it offers a detailed account of how different sub-sets of legitimacy are being mobilised in corporate reports response to long-term and episodic legitimacy considerations. In addition, the study offers one of the first interpretive accounts of how strategies used to manage legitimacy may constrain the potential of a material external shock resulting in internal organisational change. Finally, the study offers one of the first examples of the operation of legitimacy and organisational change theory from the African Continent.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2011

Frédérique Déjean, Marie-Astrid Le Theule and Bruno Oxibar

In France, a religious congregation created the first ethical fund in 1983. By the end of the 1980s, only two ethical funds were operating. During the second half of the…

Abstract

In France, a religious congregation created the first ethical fund in 1983. By the end of the 1980s, only two ethical funds were operating. During the second half of the 1990s, the number of SRI funds rose rapidly – only 7 were available in 1997, by December 2001 this number had jumped to 42 and then to 137 by the end of 2007. In 2010, almost 300 SR funds were available. During the period from end of 2001 to end of 2010, the percentage of total French mutual fund capitalization represented by SRI funds climbed from 0.12% to nearly 1% (www.novethic.fr). Despite the fact that this total amount remains modest, still all retail networks are now offering such funds.

Details

Finance and Sustainability: Towards a New Paradigm? A Post-Crisis Agenda
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-092-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Alison Berry

The purpose of this paper is to identify how the US Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) communicatively engaged in legitimization concerning accreditation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how the US Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) communicatively engaged in legitimization concerning accreditation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized the rhetorical analysis approach outlined by Hoffman and Ford (2010) to explore the accreditation-related texts from an online source created by CHEA, Information About Accreditation.

Findings

The analysis identified three overarching approaches to include: isomorphism to address regulatory legitimacy, organizational identity management to address pragmatic legitimacy, and a dialogic approach to address normative legitimacy. This analysis also developed a new theoretical model for the rhetorical construction of legitimacy, “A Model for the Rhetorical Construction of Legitimacy,” that can be summarized as: organizations foster a type of legitimacy through a legitimizing strategy by demonstrating how the purpose of the legitimizing strategy is achieved by the implementation of the legitimizing strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include that data were gathered only from online, web-based texts during a period in which the rhetorical situation was ongoing.

Practical implications

This study expands research concerning the rhetorical approach to issues management in that it examines the way legitimacy is negotiated through the various rhetorical strategies of an organization. Additionally, information is offered about the rhetorical structure of texts when an organization seeks to legitimize certain ideas.

Originality/value

This analysis developed a theoretical model for the rhetorical construction of legitimacy, “A Model for the Rhetorical Construction of Legitimacy,” that demonstrates important relationships between legitimizing strategies and types of legitimacy. Understanding these relationships may allow for a better interpretation of how legitimacy theory is represented within a communicative venture.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Jiyoung Kim, Sejin Ha and Clarissa Fong

This study aims to investigate consumer perception of community and employee oriented CSR program, and examine how retailers' CSR activities lead to social (i.e…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumer perception of community and employee oriented CSR program, and examine how retailers' CSR activities lead to social (i.e. legitimization) and financial support. Further, by taking the social context into account, this research examine the moderating effect of consumer engagement in community social capital on the relationship between perceived retailers' CSR action and retailer legitimization.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre-test was conducted with 144 students to validate the measurement model. A total of 220 responses from US consumers were used for the main-test, and multiple group analysis in structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in order to test the structural model.

Findings

The result indicates that when retailers are perceived as adhering to social norms through their CSR actions, they gain legitimacy and support from the consumers within the community. Further, consumer social capital moderates the relationship between perceived CSR and retailer legitimacy.

Practical implications

Findings of this research can provide retail marketers with practical implication in developing their CSR strategy catering to the community members. Understanding consumers with higher level of social capital investment will increase the capability and effectiveness of the retailers' CSR activities.

Originality/value

This research offers theoretical contributions to the current research stream of CSR studies by testing the moderating effect of consumers' engagement in the social environment on consumers' legitimization and support toward retailers that perform CSR activities. This study also provides new perspective on assessing the outcome of retailers' CSR actions by focusing on both social and financial dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Bradley Rudkin, Danson Kimani, Subhan Ullah, Rizwan Ahmed and Syed Umar Farooq

This paper investigates the legitimacy tactics used in the annual reports of UK listed companies in the aftermath of major corporate scandals.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the legitimacy tactics used in the annual reports of UK listed companies in the aftermath of major corporate scandals.

Design/methodology/approach

We carried out a content analysis of annual reports of 19 companies that have been involved in corporate scandals with a view to understand how firms communicate negative scandals affecting them.

Findings

The findings reveal that firms use a wide range of legitimisation strategies in the manner that contribute to shape disclosure communications concerning negative incidents. For instance, some firms may offset the negativity linked to an incident by rendering such explanations amidst positive information.

Originality/value

Contrary to earlier studies conducted on accounting scandals, the authors incorporated extensive corporate scandals such as human rights violations, controversies concerning child labour, environmental scandals, corruption, financial embezzlement and tax evasion.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Mikhail Batuev and Leigh Robinson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the processes that influence the evolution of a modern sport. It focusses on the case of international skateboarding: the sport…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the processes that influence the evolution of a modern sport. It focusses on the case of international skateboarding: the sport that was recently included into the Olympic Games.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive research strategy was informed by the notions of evolution of modern sport, prolympism and new institutionalism. The primary data were collected through a series of interviews and supplemented by the analysis of documents, press and social media.

Findings

The paper analysed how the organisation of international skateboarding has changed to date and identified three major determinants of its evolution: values of the activity, commercial interests and the Olympic movement. The following recurring discussion themes emerged: the link between commercialism and legitimisation of sport; bureaucratisation under the Olympic movement; and tensions between prolympism and values of skateboarding.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the case study method is that any conclusions refer to this particular sport and their applicability to other sports lies within analytical generalisation. Still sport governing bodies and policy makers can learn from the evolution of international skateboarding and analyse potential issues and consequences for other emerging sports. In terms of theoretical implications, the study highlights legitimisation as one the key characteristics of evolution of modern sport, which should be considered along with previously established criteria, such as bureaucratisation, commercialisation and professionalisation.

Originality/value

The study extends the existing research on evolution of modern sports by examining a very rich contemporary case of skateboarding, the internationally growing sport with unique organisational arrangements. It contributes to knowledge of the evolution towards legitimisation of emerging sports, but also towards sportification of popular culture and society.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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