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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

C. Shawn Burke, Eleni Georganta and Claudia Hernandez

Our aim is to catalog how the functional behaviors that leaders engage in should change over time based on the needs of the team – thereby presenting a functional view of…

Abstract

Purpose

Our aim is to catalog how the functional behaviors that leaders engage in should change over time based on the needs of the team – thereby presenting a functional view of team leadership over time.

Methodology/approach

A critical review of the literature on team leadership, team development, and teams was conducted. This information was critically analyzed and integrated to produce a framework serving to depict how team needs change over time, and based on this, highlight the leadership behaviors which should be most critical at particular points in time. Based on the limited amount of literature that explicitly focused on team leadership over time, a series of propositions which flow from the framework are also put forth.

Findings

Great strides have been made in understanding team leadership; however, little work was uncovered that directly focused on how leadership dynamics change over time within the context of the team. Leveraging the limited work that existed, we developed a framework (and propositions) that serves to delineate how team leadership functions change over time. In doing so, we have integrated work delineating leadership functions within transition and action phases of team task cycles along with that highlighting how the role of the leader may vary based on team developmental needs.

Originality/Value

The originality of this chapter lies in its using a functional approach to leadership to argue how the efficacy of particular leadership functions change over time based on team task cycles and development needs. This, in turn, can be used to focus training efforts.

Details

Team Dynamics Over Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-403-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Ana Margarida Graça and Ana Margarida Passos

– The purpose of this paper is to compare leadership functions from different team contexts considering context characteristics that contribute to team effectiveness.

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3205

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare leadership functions from different team contexts considering context characteristics that contribute to team effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted. Seven leaders of multidisciplinary child protection teams (MDTs) and nine managers of an information technology (IT) company took part in semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using content analysis with ATLAS.ti.

Findings

Results showed that the two types of teams used different performance criteria, with teams from non-profit contexts lacking defined performance criteria. The results also showed that transition leadership functions are more frequently mentioned by IT than by MDT leaders. Moreover, interpersonal leadership functions emerged as independent functions that may occur in both the transition and action phases.

Research limitations/implications

Context is paramount for performance criteria definition and for the relevance of certain team leadership functions over others. It also presents some suggestions for improvement to the model of Morgeson et al. (2010a).

Practical implications

The results support the idea that there are differences in the leadership functions that are most valued by leaders, depending on the specific team’s context. Results also showed that some non-profit and less task-structured teams lack the specific performance criteria that could help them make more successful interventions.

Originality/value

This paper reviews context literature, it shows that the emphasis on team leadership functions can vary across contexts and to the knowledge it is the first that compares the model of Morgeson et al. (2010a) in different contexts.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Dapeng Zhang, Xinbo Sun, Feng Tian and Shunyi Zhou

The internet-based transition is the major trend for Chinese organizations with increasing demands imposed on their organization and management. As the organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet-based transition is the major trend for Chinese organizations with increasing demands imposed on their organization and management. As the organizational structures gradually improve flexibility, employees desire respect and development to a greater degree, which has given rise to a new leadership model-integrative leadership. This paper aims to investigate the impact of integrative leadership on employee’s innovation performance through a multilevel analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes the two situational factors employee psychological empowerment and human resource flexibility as the mediating factors impact the relationship between integrative leadership and employee innovation performance. Valid questionnaires were collected from 619 employees from 135 leader groups of High-tech companies in China.

Findings

The results show that integrative leadership has positive impact on employees’ innovation performance through its multilevel impacts on two mediation factors include psychological empowerment of employees and human resource flexibility.

Research limitations/implications

This research used cross-sectional studies due to constraints of research conditions. The measurements of all variables are done simultaneously, whereas the effects of integrative leadership on the development of corporations should be presented in a dynamic process. Therefore, in the future research, vertical research design should be adopted to deeply explore the effectiveness mechanism of integrative leadership in the context of corporate internet-based transition.

Practical implications

In the internet era, leaders cannot blindly pursue organizational performance. They must establish a flexible organizational structure and institutions to provide a platform for employee development, and integrative leaders need to pay attention to inspire the potential of employees and stimulate the enthusiasm of employees.

Originality/value

This study investigates a new leadership-integrative leadership and the relationship between integrative leadership and innovation performance in the context of Internet-based transitional Chinese organizations, thereby making important theoretical contributions as well as offering practical suggestions for improving leadership efficiency and innovation performance.

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Steven V. Manderscheid and Alexandre Ardichvili

This study seeks to test the researchers' theory that a leadership development intervention called “leader assimilation” for newly appointed leaders and their subordinates…

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3020

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to test the researchers' theory that a leadership development intervention called “leader assimilation” for newly appointed leaders and their subordinates will facilitate feedback‐seeking and a leader‐team dialogue which will accelerate leader/team learning, leader adaptation, and relationship building between the new leaders and their teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Robert Yin's positivistic multiple case study research method was used. Four primary modes of data collection were used in each of the three cases: observation during the five steps of the intervention, documentation review after the intervention, a pre‐ and post‐survey, and individual interviews with the leader and the leader's direct reports approximately seven days after the last phase of the intervention.

Findings

The researchers found support for their theory from a leader and team perspective. The three leaders in the study experienced accelerated learning, adaptation, and they built relationships with their teams. The leaders' teams experienced new learning and they built relationships with their new leaders.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of findings is limited by the number of cases studied and by industry, leader, and team variation across cases.

Practical implications

The study provides supporting evidence for the importance and effectiveness of leader assimilations in helping new leaders learn, adapt quickly, and build relationships with their teams early in their transition.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to report on the outcomes of an early leadership development intervention to help new leaders transition from one leadership role to another.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Michael Watkins

The actions taken during the first three months of a new job will largely determine whether you succeed or fail in the long term. The goal should be transition

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4525

Abstract

The actions taken during the first three months of a new job will largely determine whether you succeed or fail in the long term. The goal should be transition acceleration, not just failure prevention. This article offers a blueprint for addressing the linked challenges of personal transition and organizational transformation that confront all leaders in their first few months in a new job. Five propositions are: (1) The root causes of transition failure always lie in a pernicious interaction between the situation (with its opportunities and pitfalls), and the individual (with his/her strengths and vulnerabilities); (2) There are systematic methods that leaders can employ to both lessen the likelihood of failure and reach the breakeven point faster; (3) The overriding goal in a transition is to build momentum by creating virtuous cycles that build credibility and by avoiding getting caught in vicious cycles that damage credibility; (4) Transitions are a crucible for leadership development and should be managed accordingly. They strengthen diagnostic skills, demand growth and adaptation, and test personal stamina. Transitioning is a teachable skill; (5) Adoption of a standard framework for accelerating transitions can yield big returns for organizations. Everyone (bosses, direct reports, and peers) needs to speak the same “transition language”. Match leadership strategy to situation – methodically diagnose the situation and match your strategy to it: Step one – Diagnose the business situation. The four broad types of business situations: start‐up, turnaround, realignment, and sustaining success. Each presents a distinct set of challenges. This article defines actions for each. Step two – create a 90‐day transition acceleration plan. A framework of the ten key transition challenges is included in the article.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Oscar Noel Ocho, Erica Wheeler, Janet Rigby and Gail Tomblin Murphy

Nurses are a significant part of the professional workforce, but leaders may be promoted without the requisite competencies. This study aims to explore the perspectives of…

Abstract

Purpose

Nurses are a significant part of the professional workforce, but leaders may be promoted without the requisite competencies. This study aims to explore the perspectives of nurse managers about the core competencies necessary for promotion as leaders in health.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed-methods study that targeted nurses (N = 126) who were promoted in four Caribbean countries over the past five years. A 30-item questionnaire was used for quantitative data collection and analyzed using SPSS version 25. Interviews yielded the qualitative data, which were analyzed using open coding and thematic analysis. Ethical approvals were received from ethics committees at the university and country level.

Findings

Most participants were female (n = 112), had 15 or more years’ experience (n = 71) and an associate degree/diploma in nursing (n = 62). Leadership was the most important competency required of nurse leaders in spite of their position within the organization, followed by team building and motivation. Challenges to the transitioning into leadership positions included the prevailing culture and a lack of a systematic approach to building capacity in leadership. There was also between-group statistical significance, as determined by one-way ANOVA for delegation, motivation and leadership as core competencies based on occupations roles.

Research limitations/implications

Notwithstanding the importance of the findings from this research, there were some limitations. While the researchers considered implementing this study in eight Caribbean countries, approvals were received for only four countries. This will affect the ability to generalize the findings to the wider Caribbean countries. One of the strengths of this research was the use of mixed methods for data collection. However, the qualitative component of the findings may be limited by the number of focus groups conducted, notwithstanding the richness of the data collected.

Practical implications

The findings can be used as a framework from which the health system in developing countries can begin to examine practical solutions to developing 21st century leadership competencies in nursing. While there may be remanence of the colonial past in the way systems function, the complexity of health systems requires leadership that is rooted in competence that is multidimensional.

Originality/value

This paper provides an important contribution to the literature on leadership and competencies from the perspective of low- to middle-income resource settings. The qualitative component of the research added richness to the nuances and understanding of the phenomenon of competencies for nurse leaders.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Book part
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Jennifer W. Purcell

This chapter discusses the challenges of safeguarding academic freedom during leadership transitions and organizational change in universities. Examples from a large…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the challenges of safeguarding academic freedom during leadership transitions and organizational change in universities. Examples from a large public university illustrate current challenges and provide perspective for proactive measures to protect academic freedom. While the context and details are unique to the institution featured in the chapter, the lessons gleaned from each vignette offer valuable insight to faculty and university leaders who are motivated to better understand and uphold the principles of academic freedom and, more broadly, protected speech with higher education. To support academic leaders in achieving these goals, a conceptual framework for shared leadership through shared governance to support academic freedom is presented. The chapter concludes with recommendations for leveraging shared leadership to foster a university culture that supports of academic freedom.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Joana Kuntz, Brendan Davies and Katharina Naswall

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether Chief Executive Officers’ (CEOs) discrepant leadership styles are reflected on CEO succession outcomes, operationalised as…

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1348

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether Chief Executive Officers’ (CEOs) discrepant leadership styles are reflected on CEO succession outcomes, operationalised as changes to employee views of the organisation following the succession.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested in a sample of 230 employees who completed an online survey at four time points over a three-year period. Linear mixed models analyses tested for significant changes to alignment, participation, learning culture, organisational commitment and engagement perceptions over time. Qualitative data were content-analysed to ascertain the CEOs’ leadership styles and explore employee views of the organisation.

Findings

While alignment and participation scores did not significantly increase following the CEO succession, learning culture, organisational commitment and engagement increased significantly.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to the limited research on CEO succession. It suggests that what renders a succession adaptive or disruptive may be contingent on the leadership styles of outgoing and incoming CEOs.

Practical implications

The transition from a transactional to a transformational CEO may have a stronger impact on motivational and attitudinal outcomes (e.g. engagement) than on operational outcomes (e.g. alignment).

Originality/value

This study is the first to longitudinally examine a range employee outcomes of CEO succession considering the incoming and outgoing CEOs’ discrepant leadership styles. It extends the leadership literature by empirically showing that, despite the disruption underlying a succession event, employee views of the organisation improve significantly following the transition from a transactional to a transformational leader.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Urs Baldegger and Johanna Gast

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence and development of leadership within the context of new ventures.

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1021

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence and development of leadership within the context of new ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was conducted to analyze in-depth the circumstances under which leadership is emerging and evolving in new ventures. In doing so, 55 founder-CEOs from Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland were interviewed.

Findings

The findings suggest that during the development from new ventures to early growth ventures the founder-CEOs and their organizations experience three major transitions. First, the founder-CEOs’ leadership behavior tends to emerge and evolve alongside firm development from being more transformational in new ventures to more transactional in early growth ventures. Second, the decisive employee selection criteria change over time, and the initially important person-founder fit turns into a person-organization fit. Third, a transition from a rather external perspective of the founder-CEOs in the new venture stage to a more internally oriented perspective in the early stages of growth was observed.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings advance research on leadership in new ventures, the limitations concerning potential recall biases and subjectivism have to be kept in mind.

Practical implications

In practice, the findings imply that the emergence and development of leadership in new ventures should be seen as a dynamic process.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to study in-depth the emergence and development of leadership in the context of new ventures.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2020

Anita Zehrer and Gabriela Leiß

This paper aims to explore the pertinent issues, barriers and pitfalls of intergenerational communication in business families during their leadership succession period.

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3271

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the pertinent issues, barriers and pitfalls of intergenerational communication in business families during their leadership succession period.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on relational leadership theory, the paper makes use of an action research approach using a qualitative single case study to investigate communication barriers and pitfalls in business transition.

Findings

Through action research, interventions were taken in the underlying case, which increased the consciousness, as well as the personal and social competencies of the business family. Thus, business families stuck in ambivalent entanglement understand their underlying motives and needs within the change process, get into closer contact with their emotional barriers and communication hindrances, which is a prerequisite for any change, and break the succession iceberg phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should undertake multiple case studies to validate and/or modify the qualitative methods used in this action research to increase the validity and generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Given the large number of business families in transition, our study shows the beneficial effects action research might have on business families’ communication behavior along a change process. The findings might help other business families to understand the value of action research for such underlying challenges and decrease communication barriers.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to have addressed intergenerational communication of business families using an action research approach.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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