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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Emmanuel Yeboah-Assiamah, Kobus Muller and Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh

Natural resources in contemporary times are mostly managed by a collaborative governance approach which hinges on complex institutional designs (rules, norms and…

Abstract

Purpose

Natural resources in contemporary times are mostly managed by a collaborative governance approach which hinges on complex institutional designs (rules, norms and strategies). Many studies have been designed and carried out to assess collaborative governance, and the various institutional designs underpinning them. The purpose of this paper is to unpack the methodological gaps in natural resource governance research (with emphasis on co-management) and to conceptualise the appropriateness of Transdisciplinary (TD) research approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a critical stage review of relevant theoretical and empirical literature on natural resource governance. It discusses the complexities inherent in natural resource governance and juxtaposes these with the inherent weaknesses in methodologies employed by existing studies on the concept. The authors make a case for a TD research methodology that links scientists, practitioners and society in a joint problem design and solution process.

Findings

The authors register a “fuzziness” of the collaborative governance phenomenon but observe a methodological gap in existing studies on the concept. This paper discusses the complexities inherent. The paper describes TD as a “tailor-made approach” to solving complex societal issues and makes a case for its adoption in natural resource governance studies.

Research limitations/implications

This standalone paper is largely conceptual and not linked to any primary data; this notwithstanding, it synthesizes from both empirical and theoretical literature which would help shape future research endeavours in natural resource governance context.

Practical implications

With TD study oriented towards an epistemologically flexible approach, perspectives from different social and academic actors are integrated in this expanding field of research to address societal problems.

Originality/value

The paper provides a conceptual framework designating how actors interact in the TD research process as well as a “four-phase” approach in carrying out a TD research.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Theresa Obuobisa-Darko and Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh

The purpose of this paper is to identify the behaviour of leaders that enhances employee engagement (EE) in organisations. It locates the importance of EE and the role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the behaviour of leaders that enhances employee engagement (EE) in organisations. It locates the importance of EE and the role leaders play within the public sector in a developing country and finds answer to the question on the behaviour of the leader that causes employees to be engaged.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses qualitative method to identify the behaviour of leaders that causes and enhances employees to be engaged. It proposes a framework outlining what the leader does to ensure EE.

Findings

Based on results of data analysed, six behaviours of leaders were identified: seeking employee welfare and caring; openness and information flow; conscientiousness; good and cordial relationship; fairness and trust and lastly involvement in decision making.

Research limitations/implications

Limitation of the study was that it did not focus on the entire public sector but was carried out in only one company. It is therefore recommended that further studies could be carried out with focus on other public sector organisations to confirm the leader behaviour identified. Again, a comparative study between public and private sector organisations could be carried out to ascertain if there are differences in the behaviour of the leaders that cause employees to be engaged in these two different sectors.

Practical implications

The study develops a framework outlining behaviour which leaders within organisations could exhibit to enhance EE and thus organisational success.

Originality/value

The paper provides a framework that shows leader behaviour that causes EE in organisations in a developing country. This framework will be helpful to leaders in organisations to behave in specific ways to enhance EE and for researchers who want to conduct research in this field of study.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh

Since Ghana gained political independence from British colonial rule in 1957, the country has had a number of administrative reforms that covered varied subjects…

Abstract

Since Ghana gained political independence from British colonial rule in 1957, the country has had a number of administrative reforms that covered varied subjects, including ministerial restructuring, decentralisation, revision of schemes of service and pay and grading systems, motivation and civil service legislation. The past decade (1990‐2000), especially, has witnessed sustained efforts at reforms to improve the public sector's policy‐making, service delivery, and oversight and accountability roles. For Ghana to achieve the objectives of these reform initiatives, the country needs to effectively manage all the constitutive elements that contribute to the goals of sustainable development. This study set out to examine the efforts being made to reform the system of environmental management in Ghana, since the costs imposed on Ghanaians and the economy from environmental degradation are enormous and can greatly impede the growth towards sustainable development.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh and Justice Nyigmah Bawole

The aim of this paper is to examine poverty and poverty reduction at the local level using the Hohoe Municipality and Sefwi‐Wiaso District, both in Ghana, as a case.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine poverty and poverty reduction at the local level using the Hohoe Municipality and Sefwi‐Wiaso District, both in Ghana, as a case.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a survey method, collecting data from 180 farmers on the various aspects of the topic to form the basis of the study. Questionnaires and focus group discussions were used as the data collection instruments.

Findings

The study found that, although many poverty reduction initiatives have been undertaken in Ghana, their impact on the poor farming communities has been very minimal. The failure of these poverty reduction policies could be attributed to the non‐involvement of local people in the process of policy formation. It also revealed that the number of poor people and the degree of poverty might be higher than the details captured by official statistics and publications.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is biased towards farmers. It did not consider other sectors of the Ghanaian population.

Practical implications

Poverty reduction programmes to be developed and implemented in the future must be designed using bottom‐up approaches and must factor the rural farmer into the equation since the agriculture sector is still the largest employer in Ghana.

Originality/value

The paper discusses poverty and how it can be reduced, relying on what the victims of poverty consider as the main causes of poverty and how its reduction can be achieved.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Roger Ayimbillah Atinga, Gordon Abekah‐Nkrumah and Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh

The study aims to examine how communication, provider courtesy, support/care, environment of the facility and waiting time significantly predict patients' satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine how communication, provider courtesy, support/care, environment of the facility and waiting time significantly predict patients' satisfaction with quality of healthcare in two hospitals located in northern Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study of which 324 respondents were selected using stratified and convenient sampling techniques. Results are presented using a multiple regression model.

Findings

The results revealed that of the five‐factor model, support/care, environment of the facility and waiting time determine patients' satisfaction with quality of healthcare delivery. The explanatory power of the dependent variable was explained by 51 percent.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that internal and external health sector stakeholders may possibly use this study as a precursor to improve service quality in the two hospitals in particular and others in general.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Victor Owusu, Awudu Abdulai and Williams Ali

This article analyzes farmers' preferences for different nonindexed crop insurance alternatives, using discrete choice experiment data on cocoa farmers from southern…

Abstract

Purpose

This article analyzes farmers' preferences for different nonindexed crop insurance alternatives, using discrete choice experiment data on cocoa farmers from southern Ghana. We examine farmers' attendance to attributes by comparing self-reported attribute nonattendance (ANA) to the behavior inferred from the choices.

Design/methodology/approach

We utilize the latent class endogenous attribute attendance (EAA) model to address potential endogeneity by jointly modelling farmers' attribute processing strategies with their choice of attributes of the insurance products.

Findings

The results show that premium levels, mode and length of indemnity payouts tend to influence farmers' preferences for crop insurance products. The findings also reveal that credit-constrained farmers attend more to premium and payment mode attributes of the crop insurance products and that credit-constrained farmers tend to exhibit lower willingness-to-pay estimates for the crop insurance attributes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from the study suggest that credit constraints do not only limit input use, but also tend to have statistically significant impact on farmers' cocoa insurance participation decisions.

Originality/value

The study examines the impact of credit constraints on farmers' crop insurance preferences while accounting for ANA.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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