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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Krishna Venkitachalam and Rachelle Bosua

Knowledge-based work is growing at a significant pace in the context of large organizations. As a consequence, use and transfer of knowledge are considered important

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge-based work is growing at a significant pace in the context of large organizations. As a consequence, use and transfer of knowledge are considered important activities of knowledge mobilization. Existing literature suggests that there is an increasing gap in the understanding of roles and typical responsibilities in knowledge mobilization. The purpose of this article is to examine how roles enable knowledge mobilization in large organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design was used where three large organizations representing multiple sectors were selected to study roles that enable the mobilization of organizational knowledge.

Findings

This study explains the understanding of five roles and their typical responsibilities to enable the mobilization of knowledge in large organizations – knowledge mentor, broker, taxonomist, content editor, and gatekeeper. These roles foster collaboration and communication activities within and between teams enabling knowledge mobilization.

Research limitations/implications

The authors acknowledge the limitations of this paper. Although the recognized roles provide valuable insights with respect to mobility of knowledge, it does not specify how each role can be assessed in terms of performance. Another limitation is that these roles were studied in the context of large-scale organizations where knowledge work is central to their performance.

Originality/value

This study ' s findings suggest that there is a strong need for management to recognize and value roles and responsibilities to realize organizational knowledge mobilization.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Steven Reid

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of leaders on knowledge creation and mobilization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of leaders on knowledge creation and mobilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed methods study included three high-performing districts based on provincial assessment results and socio-economic factors. Interviews and questionnaires were used to gather data from 53 participants including: 11 principals, 11 teacher leaders, 26 teachers, and five system leaders.

Findings

The findings of the study emphasized the importance of leaders supporting knowledge creation and mobilization processes through practices such as engaging school-based knowledge influencers and fostering cultures of trust and risk taking. The author defined knowledge influencers as leaders, formal or informal, who have access to knowledge creating groups at the local and system level. These leaders influenced knowledge mobilization at different levels of the district.

Research limitations/implications

A research limitation of this study was present based on the sole use of high-performing districts and schools. Participation was determined via comparisons of provincial assessment results (Ontario, Canada) and socio-economic status (SES) factors. Although causal effects are cautioned, districts and schools from various SES communities (high, medium, low) were chosen to support broad generalizations and associations.

Practical implications

This study provided pragmatic considerations and recommendations for system and school leaders, those charged with increasing student achievement (e.g. use of knowledge influencers and an expanded array of data use while creating knowledge).

Originality/value

A knowledge creation model was developed by the author based on a synthesis of the findings. The model and study will be of interest to those wishing to further implement or study the creation and mobilization of knowledge within organizations.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

C. Annique Un and Angeles Montoro‐Sanchez

The purpose of this paper is to integrate three streams of literature – organizational capabilities based in resource‐based view (RBV) and the team‐ and organization‐level…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate three streams of literature – organizational capabilities based in resource‐based view (RBV) and the team‐ and organization‐level innovation – to provide a theoretical framework of how firms invest in developing innovative capabilities for entrepreneurship and change management.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper based on the RBV and the team‐ and organization‐level innovation literatures.

Findings

Linking the three bodies of literature, two main models for developing innovative capabilities are proposed: organization and project team models. The “organization model” requires firms to invest at the organization level to generate the supporting organization‐level processes, i.e. communication routines, independent of when they organize for innovation, and the “project team model” calls for just‐in‐time investment as needed in the process of innovation. The paper discusses other potential models and provides directions for future research on this important and timely topic.

Originality/value

The paper expands the RBV of the firm by providing a theoretical framework of how firms develop the capabilities to mobilize and create knowledge for innovation as an entrepreneurial activity and for managing the changes in organizations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Alex Bennet and David Bennet

Based on recent neuroscience research, and a deeper understanding of information and knowledge, this paper aims to investigate the characteristics of building sustainable

Abstract

Purpose

Based on recent neuroscience research, and a deeper understanding of information and knowledge, this paper aims to investigate the characteristics of building sustainable knowledge for communities and cities with a focus on the social process of knowledge mobilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the concept of knowledge reuse by providing a new model of information and knowledge consistent with neuroscience and the demands of CUCA, using this model as an analogy to explore the social context of knowledge mobilization with its process of collaborative entanglement, and looking at the concepts of knowledge robustness and sustainability from the viewpoints of individuals and the community.

Findings

Knowledge mobilization is modeled after the associative network of neuronal firings in the human brain. The process of collaborative entanglement among experts and stakeholders not only helps provide specific solutions to current issues, but seeds the ground for continuous community improvement, collaboration, and sustainability.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical ideas and techniques for communities and individuals to move toward knowledge sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper develops a new frame of reference for looking at social knowledge mobilization and knowledge sustainability.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Pin Luarn, Tom M.Y. Lin and Peter K.Y. Lo

Enterprise mobilization refers to the provision by an enterprise of the means for its employees to update information at any time and any place through the use of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise mobilization refers to the provision by an enterprise of the means for its employees to update information at any time and any place through the use of a wireless network system and related equipment. The implementation of enterprise mobilization can be separated into two main methods, non‐enforceable and enforceable. Non‐enforceable implementation refers to those situations where, although an enterprise encourages its employees to use a mobilized system, it does not enforce such use, whereas the reverse is true in the case of enforceable methods. Aims to examine this situation.

Design/methodology/approach

Since this is a relatively new research topic with very little previous research having been undertaken in this area, this paper employs a triangulation. This method enables integration of both quantitative and qualitative data, to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of non‐enforceable mobilization by enterprises. The data were collected by means of in‐depth interviews with corporate managers and specialists from 29 enterprises and comprise 126 samples of employees currently using mobilization systems.

Findings

The study reveals a total of six CSFs for the implementation of non‐enforceable mobilization by enterprises, comprising: cooperation with a good solution “value added reseller”; appropriate planning and the support of senior management; user participation and minimization of any resistance to the installation of the system; open communication channels; enhancement of the understanding of mobilization itself and of employee requirements; and effective mobilization equipment.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to organizations looking to implement a wireless network system. The results provided can be used as references for industry and businesses in general, to support their decision‐making processes concerning the introduction of mobilization.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 105 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Livia Anna Julia Jesacher-Roessler

In the context of professional learning networks (PLNs), there are many studies which address knowledge mobilization (KMb). The majority of these focus on how research is…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of professional learning networks (PLNs), there are many studies which address knowledge mobilization (KMb). The majority of these focus on how research is mobilized by various actors. This paper explores the concepts of KMb both on an individual and an organizational level and discusses the role of PLN participants and PLNs as catalysts for institutional change (IC). To illustrate this, a model was developed which draws on a concept that depicts the mobilization processes at the various levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was developed by drawing on theoretical approaches to both KMb on an individual and an organizational level of schools. The strengths and limitations of the model are then assessed as part of an exploratory study. Interviews of PLN participants (n = 7) from two schools and detailed logbooks of two participants were used to reconstruct experiences of KMb in the PLNs and the process of KMb among schools. By contrasting two schools, the study traces how mechanisms of KMb occurred. Data sources were analyzed using a structured content analysis alongside a deductive–inductive code system.

Findings

The results of the exploratory study show that, although the model is able to map the KMb practices, some refinement is still needed. While the extension of concepts describing the work of knowledge mobilizer (KM) leads to a more theoretically differentiated perspective, the data also showed that PLN participants only partially define themselves as KMs. The connection to concepts of strategies of knowledge mobilizing on an organizational level led to an increased transparency in the theoretical model. The data showed that KMb is influenced by organizational and individual beliefs.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the current knowledge base through a theoretical model that addresses the underinvestigated topic of KMb regarding the link between the individual and organizational levels. With a special focus on individual and organizational levels, a connection between KMb and IC is provided. The theoretical framework and research findings from an additional explorative study can be used to further develop relevant insights into the actions of participants from PLNs that enable IC processes among their schools.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Kristian Kreiner

This article discusses both the management of tacit knowledge and the tacit approach to knowledge management. Tacit knowledge must be made manageable by being explicated…

Abstract

This article discusses both the management of tacit knowledge and the tacit approach to knowledge management. Tacit knowledge must be made manageable by being explicated and separated from the knowledge workers, so that the knowledge resources do not go home at night. However, the less knowledge leaving in the evening, the less knowledge will return the following morning. Making the organization as independent as possible of the tacit knowledge of its knowledge workers is an ironic program for knowledge management, since it advocates a reduction of the total resource pool for the sake of managerial control. The article searches for alternatives to knowledge management exercised from a position of control and ownership. A case study of product development is analyzed. This specialized context focuses attention on knowledge mobilization rather than knowledge control and sharing. The artifact provides sufficient pressure for order and coordination to emerge spontaneously. Knowledge management can in such circumstances become tacit without losing its value.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Sven C. Voelpel, Heinrich von Pierer and Christoph K. Streb

The purpose of the article is to provide managers and academics alike with valuable insights into how global organizations are able to manage innovation by the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the article is to provide managers and academics alike with valuable insights into how global organizations are able to manage innovation by the organization‐wide mobilization of knowledge resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is the result of an eight‐year in‐depth theoretical and practical research process mainly undertaken within Siemens AG, and is based on a total of 68 expert interviews conducted with distinguished experts in related fields. Consisting of three phases, the research stretched from analyzing the interrelation of mobility and innovation and deducing case studies towards the development of an integrated model of a mobile company.

Findings

In order to leverage on innovation as one of the most important sources of competitiveness and business success, organizations have to abandon outdated organizational models and engage into mobilizing their knowledge resources.

Originality/value

The results of this in‐depth work can be applied to the reality of a global business, networked across organizations, people, borders and cultures. By providing proof of the impact of people and business processes' mobility on knowledge creation, this article shows how to mobilize organizations for innovation and, consequently, value creation by suggesting an advanced organizational model called the “MOBILE company”.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Benoit Le Blanc and Jean‐Luc Bouillon

The sciences of knowledge and the sciences of communication have evolved to become two separate disciplines. The current transformations of technologies, managerial

Abstract

Purpose

The sciences of knowledge and the sciences of communication have evolved to become two separate disciplines. The current transformations of technologies, managerial practices, and organization of work, force communication sciences to take into account issues related to cognition. Similarly, the science of knowledge needs to better consider the problems of context, economy and social environment, at a higher level of generalization than just those of individuals or groups. This paper seeks to present how both sciences can better integrate.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from an epistemological study of the use of the word “knowledge” in cognitive sciences and in sciences of communication, the authors developed a framework to analyze knowledge management tools and practices.

Findings

The framework developed presents the organizational mechanisms for knowledge management in relation to the artifacts (objects) of communication through which they operate. It highlights the cognitive aspects present in communications.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the general aspect of the framework, some applications in industries might only be relevant to a portion of the framework. Further applications in several contexts are encouraged.

Originality/value

The study of the relationship between knowledge and communication aims to bring together the research which puts into perspective the analysis of forms, tools and methods of knowledge management, with the study of associated communication issues. The implementation of knowledge management systems within organizations is often associated with organizational change. The study of communications implied in this change leads to a macro‐analysis methodology to appreciate strengths and weaknesses of these mutations.

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