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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Belle Rose Ragins

There is an explosion of interest in programmes to help women gain mentors in organizations. Despite the haste to jump on the “mentoring bandwagon”, there is little…

2101

Abstract

There is an explosion of interest in programmes to help women gain mentors in organizations. Despite the haste to jump on the “mentoring bandwagon”, there is little information on the barriers women face in obtaining a mentor. Discusses these barriers and the results of a study addressing this issue. Presents practical implications for organizations.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Richard Stead

Nearly 400 young learners with mentors were studied in a project which ran from 1992‐94 at Leeds Metropolitan University. Shows that many learners find effective…

2077

Abstract

Nearly 400 young learners with mentors were studied in a project which ran from 1992‐94 at Leeds Metropolitan University. Shows that many learners find effective substitutes for conventional mentors, and, while needing support for their workplace learning, obtain this from a variety of helpers other than a conventionally‐defined mentor. Managers are not ideal mentors. Relevant expert knowledge on the part of a mentor is important, as is formality in conducting learner‐mentor relationships. Training for mentors is also confirmed as important. Time pressures can prevent would‐be mentors from offering their services. Stability of employment for both parties for the duration of the relationship is important.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Annette Vincent and Judy Seymour

Female executives in the USA were surveyed to determine characteristicsof and interactions of mentors and protégés. Questions focus onpreparation for roles, selection…

883

Abstract

Female executives in the USA were surveyed to determine characteristics of and interactions of mentors and protégés. Questions focus on preparation for roles, selection process, gender issues, relationship of mentor/protégé, number of mentors each protégé has had, benefits to careers, and other relationships derived from mentoring. Major findings are that an individual who has been a protégé is more willing to become a mentor; that an individual who has had a mentor is more willing to enter subsequent mentoring relationships; and that more women are mentors today as compared with the number of women mentors ten years ago.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Robert G. Wright and William B. Werther

Practitioners and researchers agree on the importance of mentors,even though the spontaneous creation of mentors andprotégés is little understood. Thementor‐protég…

Abstract

Practitioners and researchers agree on the importance of mentors, even though the spontaneous creation of mentors and protégés is little understood. The mentor‐protégé creation process is addressed, and the individual and organisational benefits, and the role of protégés in the relationship, are discussed. Also discussed is the need for mentoring and mentors, explaining how informal, even chance encounters, can grow into strong relationships that benefit both parties and their organisation. Special emphasis is given to the protégé′s role and likely road‐blocks to the formation of these important relationships.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Christopher Orpen

Examines the effects of a two‐year formal mentoring programme in a medium‐sized manufacturing company on the work motivation, organizational commitment and job performance…

17064

Abstract

Examines the effects of a two‐year formal mentoring programme in a medium‐sized manufacturing company on the work motivation, organizational commitment and job performance of mentees. Single measures were obtained, for each mentor‐mentee pair, at the completion of the programme, from the 39 mentors and 39 mentees who remained. These measures included the pairs’ interaction opportunities; and the closeness of their relationship. At the same time, measures were obtained from mentees of their work motivation and organizational commitment. The performance of each mentee was given by ratings from their superiors. Significant relations were found between interaction opportunities and both motivation and commitment, and between relationship closeness and both these attitudes. Finds that the relations between the two mentoring variables and performance were both non‐significant. The results suggest that formal mentoring can improve employee attitudes without necessarily raising their performance, at least in the short term.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Bob Garvey

The final part in a series of three articles, discusses anevaluation of the Northern and Yorkshire region of the health servicesmentor scheme, linked to Durham MBA…

625

Abstract

The final part in a series of three articles, discusses an evaluation of the Northern and Yorkshire region of the health services mentor scheme, linked to Durham MBA. Reports on the results of a survey of 42 health‐service mentees who have just finished a two‐year MBA course and their 42 mentors. Highlights issues raised by mentees and mentors, and discusses the implications of these for development and improvement of the scheme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Jo Hamilton‐Jones

This article describes the support provided to FrontLine students involved in a unique scheme run by Coca‐Cola and Schweppes, the University of Bradford and the National…

Abstract

This article describes the support provided to FrontLine students involved in a unique scheme run by Coca‐Cola and Schweppes, the University of Bradford and the National Extension College, Cambridge, where participants combine a job with a fully supported distance learning course leading to a degree in management. Focussing on the position of tutor mentor, this case study emphasises the vital nature of the role in supporting the learning of students on the programme. A model of effective mentor‐student relationships developing and responding within a dynamic system is presented. Some evaluation of student feedback leads to consideration of such questions as: are tutor mentors effective? What type of student needs their tutor mentor most/least? How do the students perceive the role of the tutor/mentor? The paper concludes that the tutor mentor provides the “stability” factor within this particular degree programme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Rinat Arviv Elyashiv and Michal Levi-Keren

The present study focused on an incubator model for the absorption of beginning teachers into the education system. This new model is based on the cooperative approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study focused on an incubator model for the absorption of beginning teachers into the education system. This new model is based on the cooperative approach. The study examined mentoring perceptions among mentors. More specifically, the study investigated how mentors perceive the incubator and how mentors view the support provided to beginning teachers, as well as the contribution mentoring makes to fostering mentors' own sense of efficacy and professional development. These aspects were examined in comparison to the traditional dyadic model.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on quantitative and qualitative methods. In the quantitative study, 92 mentors working in incubators and 382 mentors working in a traditional dyadic setting responded to a self-report questionnaire. In the qualitative study, 28 mentors who were part of an incubator were interviewed.

Findings

The research findings indicate that the incubators create a dual effect of development and constitute a mantle of support that impacts the mentoring process, positions that as a dialogic–communal process and at the same time contributes to the professional development of both the beginning teachers and mentors.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the theoretical and practical contribution of the incubators as a new model for inducting beginning teachers into the profession.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Melissa Cain, Danika Rhiannon Blackstock, Melissa Fanshawe, Mahadeo Sukhai and Ainsley Latour

The purpose of this article is to understand the role and value of mentorship for young people with blindness and low vision (BLV) through their education and work journey…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to understand the role and value of mentorship for young people with blindness and low vision (BLV) through their education and work journey and to provide a conceptual framework for developing mentoring opportunities for young people with BLV.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiences of formal and informal mentorship were gathered within two distinct groups: adolescents with BLV in Australia and young adults with BLV in Canada. Qualitative data were collected from semi-structured individualized interviews regarding the experiences, understanding, and valuing of mentorship within these groups.

Findings

Results indicate the importance of informal role models and formal mentors within the lives of participants and how these become more refined and specific over time. Australian students valued role models as examples of success and inspiration for their own goals. Canadian mentees desired mentors as examples of personal lived experiences and providers of career-specific advice.

Originality/value

The study is original in its focus on the role of mentors for young people with blindness or low vision.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Caren Brenda Scheepers and Rebone Mahlangu

This study explored the motives, relationship dynamics and outcomes of male executives in mentoring Black African women within the context of South Africa. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the motives, relationship dynamics and outcomes of male executives in mentoring Black African women within the context of South Africa. The authors investigated the experiences of White, Black African, coloured, and Indian male mentors conducting cross-gender and cross-race mentoring in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted with 21 male executives within South Africa's male-dominated financial services industry. Data were collected via semi-structured, one-on-one virtual video interviews. The study endeavoured to deeper understand the mentors' experiences during their interactions with the intersecting marginalised identities of Black African women as protégés.

Findings

The authors found that the mentoring relationship is central to mentoring Black African women. This relationship is often influenced by the mentors' parental approach to mentoring, with resultant negative consequences, including the protégé not taking accountability for driving the relationship. Mentors' stereotypical expectations of women as homemakers and carers also influenced mentoring experiences. Mentors' motives included growing next generation leaders, which led to mentors' job satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study contributes an account of male executives' motivations for mentoring Black African women, the relationship dynamics as well as negative mentoring experiences, and the mentoring outcomes for protégés and mentors. Intersectionality theory was used to highlight the mentors' lack of insight into the intersecting marginalised identities of Black African women in the unique South African context, where inequalities in terms of class, race, and gender are amplified.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 15000