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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Analia Cicchinelli and Viktoria Pammer-Schindler

This paper aims to understand what drives people – their motivations, autonomous learning attitudes and learning interests – to volunteer as mentors for a program that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand what drives people – their motivations, autonomous learning attitudes and learning interests – to volunteer as mentors for a program that helps families to ideate technological solutions to community problems.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-phase method was used to build volunteer mentor profiles; elicit topics of interest and establish relationships between those. The mentor profiles were based on self-assessments of motivation, attitude toward lifelong learning and self-regulated learning strategies. The topics of interest were elicited through content analysis of answers to reflection questions. Statistical methods were applied to analyze the relationship between the interests and the mentor profiles.

Findings

Bottom-up clustering led to the identification of three mentor groups (G1 “low”; G2 “high” and G3 “medium”) based on pre-survey data. While content analysis led to identifying topics of interest: communication skills; learning AI; mentoring; prototype development; problem-solving skills; working with families. Analyzing relationships between mentor profile and the topics of interest, the group G3 “medium,” with strong intrinsic motivation, showed significantly more interest in working with families. The group with the overall highest scores (G2 “high”) evidenced also substantial interest in learning about AI, but with high variability between members of the group.

Originality/value

The study established different types of learning interests of volunteer mentors and related them to the mentor profiles based on motivation, self-regulated learning strategies and attitudes toward lifelong learning. Such knowledge can help organizations shape the volunteering experience to provide more value to volunteers. Furthermore, the reflection questions can be used by volunteers as an instrument for reflection and by organizations to elicit the learning interests of volunteers.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Belle Rose Ragins

There is an explosion of interest in programmes to help women gain mentors in organizations. Despite the haste to jump on the “mentoring bandwagon”, there is little…

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2059

Abstract

There is an explosion of interest in programmes to help women gain mentors in organizations. Despite the haste to jump on the “mentoring bandwagon”, there is little information on the barriers women face in obtaining a mentor. Discusses these barriers and the results of a study addressing this issue. Presents practical implications for organizations.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Richard Stead

Nearly 400 young learners with mentors were studied in a project which ran from 1992‐94 at Leeds Metropolitan University. Shows that many learners find effective…

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2058

Abstract

Nearly 400 young learners with mentors were studied in a project which ran from 1992‐94 at Leeds Metropolitan University. Shows that many learners find effective substitutes for conventional mentors, and, while needing support for their workplace learning, obtain this from a variety of helpers other than a conventionally‐defined mentor. Managers are not ideal mentors. Relevant expert knowledge on the part of a mentor is important, as is formality in conducting learner‐mentor relationships. Training for mentors is also confirmed as important. Time pressures can prevent would‐be mentors from offering their services. Stability of employment for both parties for the duration of the relationship is important.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Annette Vincent and Judy Seymour

Female executives in the USA were surveyed to determine characteristicsof and interactions of mentors and protégés. Questions focus onpreparation for roles, selection…

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875

Abstract

Female executives in the USA were surveyed to determine characteristics of and interactions of mentors and protégés. Questions focus on preparation for roles, selection process, gender issues, relationship of mentor/protégé, number of mentors each protégé has had, benefits to careers, and other relationships derived from mentoring. Major findings are that an individual who has been a protégé is more willing to become a mentor; that an individual who has had a mentor is more willing to enter subsequent mentoring relationships; and that more women are mentors today as compared with the number of women mentors ten years ago.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Robert G. Wright and William B. Werther

Practitioners and researchers agree on the importance of mentors,even though the spontaneous creation of mentors andprotégés is little understood. Thementor‐protég…

Abstract

Practitioners and researchers agree on the importance of mentors, even though the spontaneous creation of mentors and protégés is little understood. The mentor‐protégé creation process is addressed, and the individual and organisational benefits, and the role of protégés in the relationship, are discussed. Also discussed is the need for mentoring and mentors, explaining how informal, even chance encounters, can grow into strong relationships that benefit both parties and their organisation. Special emphasis is given to the protégé′s role and likely road‐blocks to the formation of these important relationships.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Christopher Orpen

Examines the effects of a two‐year formal mentoring programme in a medium‐sized manufacturing company on the work motivation, organizational commitment and job performance…

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16769

Abstract

Examines the effects of a two‐year formal mentoring programme in a medium‐sized manufacturing company on the work motivation, organizational commitment and job performance of mentees. Single measures were obtained, for each mentor‐mentee pair, at the completion of the programme, from the 39 mentors and 39 mentees who remained. These measures included the pairs’ interaction opportunities; and the closeness of their relationship. At the same time, measures were obtained from mentees of their work motivation and organizational commitment. The performance of each mentee was given by ratings from their superiors. Significant relations were found between interaction opportunities and both motivation and commitment, and between relationship closeness and both these attitudes. Finds that the relations between the two mentoring variables and performance were both non‐significant. The results suggest that formal mentoring can improve employee attitudes without necessarily raising their performance, at least in the short term.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Bob Garvey

The final part in a series of three articles, discusses anevaluation of the Northern and Yorkshire region of the health servicesmentor scheme, linked to Durham MBA…

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621

Abstract

The final part in a series of three articles, discusses an evaluation of the Northern and Yorkshire region of the health services mentor scheme, linked to Durham MBA. Reports on the results of a survey of 42 health‐service mentees who have just finished a two‐year MBA course and their 42 mentors. Highlights issues raised by mentees and mentors, and discusses the implications of these for development and improvement of the scheme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Jo Hamilton‐Jones

This article describes the support provided to FrontLine students involved in a unique scheme run by Coca‐Cola and Schweppes, the University of Bradford and the National…

Abstract

This article describes the support provided to FrontLine students involved in a unique scheme run by Coca‐Cola and Schweppes, the University of Bradford and the National Extension College, Cambridge, where participants combine a job with a fully supported distance learning course leading to a degree in management. Focussing on the position of tutor mentor, this case study emphasises the vital nature of the role in supporting the learning of students on the programme. A model of effective mentor‐student relationships developing and responding within a dynamic system is presented. Some evaluation of student feedback leads to consideration of such questions as: are tutor mentors effective? What type of student needs their tutor mentor most/least? How do the students perceive the role of the tutor/mentor? The paper concludes that the tutor mentor provides the “stability” factor within this particular degree programme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Meg E. Evans, Rebecca M. Taylor, Laila McCloud and Katherine Burr

The purpose of this interdisciplinary study is to identify the aspects that faculty, student affairs educators and students indicate as salient for effective mentoring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this interdisciplinary study is to identify the aspects that faculty, student affairs educators and students indicate as salient for effective mentoring relationships that enhance ethical leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory qualitative inquiry used the Relational-Ethical-Affective-Dialogic (READ) mentoring model as a framework to examine the experiences of 13 undergraduate mentees and faculty/staff mentors in a formal mentoring program. Each study participant engaged in one semi-structured interview. Researchers coded and analyzed data using the sort and sift, think and shift process identifying power quotes to guide the thematic analysis.

Findings

The data collected in this study revealed insights into the aspects of mentor relationships that both undergraduate mentees and their mentors perceived as contributing to students' ethical leadership development. Salient elements included: (1) relational features of the mentee-mentor dynamic including trust and reciprocity; (2) structural features of the mentoring program including its focus on ethics; and (3) mentoring approaches that were attentive to power and positionality within the mentoring relationship and involved professional judgment about self-disclosure.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature by exploring effective mentoring for ethical leadership development across disciplines. With colleges and universities serving a vital role in preparing the next generation of leaders for ethical engagement in their democratic and professional roles after graduation, it is imperative to broaden our understanding of how faculty and staff can support students' ethical leadership development.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Brenda E. Ghitulescu, Shalini Khazanchi, Zhi Tang and Yang Yu

Mentoring relationships have been proposed as a potential intervention to alleviate gender disparities in scholarly output. Yet, previous research has not provided a…

Abstract

Purpose

Mentoring relationships have been proposed as a potential intervention to alleviate gender disparities in scholarly output. Yet, previous research has not provided a systematic understanding of the relationship between mentoring and scholarly output. The authors propose that individuals with a proactive personality are especially suited to leverage mentoring relationships to enhance scholarly outcomes. Structural features of mentoring relationships – gender composition, mentor supervisory status, and mentoring relationship length – provide cues that encourage the expression of proactive personality and result in higher scholarly impact.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via surveys from faculty members in a US university and were matched with objective scholarly impact data. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The impact of proactive personality on scholarly impact was more positive for women protégés with women mentors than for all other mentor-protégé pairings. Results also showed support for two hypothesized three-way interactions with mentor status and mentoring relationship length.

Originality/value

This research provides insights into the contexts where mentorship makes the most difference in protégés' scholarly achievement. Gender composition of mentoring dyads and mentor status are important boundary conditions that impact the effect of proactive personality on scholarly output.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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