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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

James C. Fowler, Robyn Catherine Price, Kirsty Burger, Alice Jennifer Mattei, Ashley Mary McCarthy, Fiona Lowe and Thuthirna Sathiyaseelan

The use of mental health treatment requirements (MHTRs) has not proven to be successful at meeting the mental health needs of the probation population in the UK, largely through…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of mental health treatment requirements (MHTRs) has not proven to be successful at meeting the mental health needs of the probation population in the UK, largely through underuse of the requirement or lack of available services. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates a method of meeting those needs without the use of MHTRs by embedding third sector services within the probation environment.

Findings

Results indicate a significant impact after a six-month follow-up in symptomology across measures of depression, anxiety, general distress and social functioning; also indicated is a significant result on recidivism, with 74 per cent of participants committing no further offences in the 12 months following treatment.

Originality/value

These results represent the only evaluation of embedded, third sector mental health services in a probation environment in the UK, and highlight a further need to embed specialist mental health services within the probation environment and generalise that practice to other forms of service structure and therapeutic methodology.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 December 2023

Kirsty Lilley

The purpose of this paper is to explore the many ways in which those who have experienced early life adversity and trauma can continue to be failed within health-care settings and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the many ways in which those who have experienced early life adversity and trauma can continue to be failed within health-care settings and other organisations. The author explores the impact that repeated exposure to indifference and a lack of help and support has on the ability to recover and rebuild a meaningful life. The author takes the reader through a journey of various autoethnographic vignettes to explore the living experience of continuing to be unseen. The author hopes to contribute to improving the lives of service users.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has written about the many ways in which distressing experiences and mental health difficulties were left unsupported by various professionals and organisations. The writing is rich and evocative and gives voice to the distress experienced from a lack of caring attention.

Findings

The author concludes that whilst it has been painful to remember the varied ways people with lived experience of early life trauma continue to be failed it has also been cathartic and helpful. It is noted that the writing of these events brings some perspective and enables the author to limit the potential for self-blame which is a regular feature of the psychology of those living with early-life relational trauma. The writing of these events serves to highlight the ways institutions might improve responses to those seeking support. The author concludes that this is a meaningful way to use such harmful experiences.

Research limitations/implications

The author concludes that recovery and the ability to rebuild a meaningful life after early-life trauma is often hindered and denied by the responses received when seeking support from various institutions and people who may be able to intervene to prevent further harm occurring. These testimonies may contribute to the wider learnings about the impacts and lived experience of early life trauma and how institutions might support and encourage recovery. The author notes the helpfulness of writing about these experiences to bring perspective and remind those who seek help that it is a great act of courage despite unhelpful responses.

Practical implications

The author has found that writing about these experiences helps to soothe any feelings of self-blame in terms of being unable to recover sooner from early life trauma and that recovery and moving forward must be positioned as a social phenomenon and not a solely individual pursuit. It is noted that writing about difficult experiences can be cathartic and bring fresh perspective and hope. Contributing to ongoing research in terms of how helping professionals can respond wisely is satisfying and meaningful for the author.

Originality/value

This is the author’s firsthand and unique testimony of how easy it can be for survivors of trauma to continue to be unseen and failed. The author also shows that there are many opportunities to support and help which are inadvertently missed which contributes to ongoing distress. The author hopes that the courage taken to write of these experiences will contribute to learnings within many professions and organisations of how to notice, support and help those in distress and living with the effects of early life trauma. The author has found the writing of this paper to be meaningful. The process has helped the author to make sense of previously distressing events. It is hoped it will be of value to the reader.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

BNF INFORMS ON VEGETARIAN DIETS The British Nutrition Foundation has recently produced a briefing paper about vegetarian diets. This explains that the strictness of the diet…

Abstract

BNF INFORMS ON VEGETARIAN DIETS The British Nutrition Foundation has recently produced a briefing paper about vegetarian diets. This explains that the strictness of the diet ranges from just omitting meat to excluding all foods of animal origin from the diet. The paper explains why vegetarian diets are increasing in popularity and discusses their nutritional adequacy.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 88 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Makbule Gezmen Karadağ, Duygu Ağagündüz, Hilal Yıldıran, Sabriye Arslan and Onur Toka

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perception and knowledge of standard food/meal portion size and related factors in young adults.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perception and knowledge of standard food/meal portion size and related factors in young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study was conducted on 1,000 volunteer young adults, consisting of 504 men and 496 women (18 and 28 years). The portion size of food/meal, amount of food measuring utensils and also nutritional knowledge were evaluated via a questionnaire and some visual materials.

Findings

Knowledge of portion sizes, amount of food each utensil holds and nutrition was evaluated via a questionnaire and some visual materials. Knowledge of portion size with respect to food groups (p = 0.015), meals (p < 0.001) and food measuring utensils (p = 0.002) and nutritional knowledge scores (p = 0.011) differed based on body mass indexes (BMI). Women had on mean a higher nutritional knowledge score than men (2.0 ± 1.3, 1.9 ± 1.1 points, respectively). The probability of having knowledge about food measuring utensils was 1.4-fold greater for individuals who had been previously educated about nutrition (p = 0.034). Individuals of the faculty of health sciences had higher mean scores for all portion scores (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

The study findings highlighted that portion knowledge and perception of young adults were affected by gender, BMI, enrolled faculty and nutritional knowledge status. This is the first study, through which the portion knowledge and perception subcomponents (food, meal and measuring utensils) are evaluated, indicating each subcomponent to be affected by distinct factors.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rod B. McNaughton and Brendan Gray

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on links between entrepreneurship and resilience.

1096

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on links between entrepreneurship and resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors discuss some key themes in this emerging area of research and reflect on how the papers in the issue contribute to debates in the literature on resilience.

Findings

While the papers in the special issue make important contributions, there is still scope for more research.

Originality/value

This is one of the first issues of a journal devoted to investigating this topic.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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