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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Keren V. More and Shay S. Tzafrir

The paper aims to fill a substantive gap in the trust literature by analyzing the mediating role of trust across different national groups. It presents a theoretical advantage…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to fill a substantive gap in the trust literature by analyzing the mediating role of trust across different national groups. It presents a theoretical advantage, from the human resource management perspective, is that the research model was examined within the context of a global pharmaceutical firm characterized by a multicultural workforce. This allowed for controlling organizational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested using data regarding only core team employees. Survey data obtained from employees of a pharmaceutical company in Israel, the UK, and Hungary. After the teams in each of the organization's three sites were mapped out, 205 employees working on 62 teams responded to the questionnaire resulting in a good quality of 61 percent response rate.

Findings

The results of zero‐order co‐relational and confirmatory factor analysis revealed the two trust foci to be interrelated, but distinct, constructs. This finding suggests that employees can develop trust in specific individuals, such as superiors, and generalized representatives, such as the organization. The mixed models analysis suggest that there are significant differences between the Israeli, UK, and Hungarian employees for three of the research variables: trust in the organization, turnover intentions, and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first cross‐national empirical studies of its kind to demonstrate the role of trust as a mediator between organizational justice and employee work attitudes and behaviors. In addition, it is one of the first cross‐national studies on trust that controlled both industrial characteristics and organizational culture.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Eun Young Park and Jung Min Jang

The purpose of this paper demonstrate that purchase intention toward a cause-related marketing (CRM)-enhanced product can be positively correlated with consumers’ social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper demonstrate that purchase intention toward a cause-related marketing (CRM)-enhanced product can be positively correlated with consumers’ social responsibility consciousness (SRC) and can be increased or decreased merely by changing the evaluation mode.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct three experimental studies with two levels of SRC (high vs low) × two evaluation modes (joint evaluation (JE) vs separate evaluation (SE)) between-subjects design. The dependent variable is purchase intent toward the CRM-enhanced product.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers with high SRC are more likely than those with low SRC to purchase a CRM-enhanced product when two products are presented side by side (JE). However, consumers’ SRC level does not impact purchase intention when they see only one product (SE) independently (Study 1). The authors confirm that the proposed effect is mediated by perceived price fairness toward the product (Studies 2 and 3).

Research limitations/implications

Future research on CRM-enhanced products should carefully consider that the impact of individuals’ SRC level was in very different directions depending on the evaluation mode. In addition, further investigation is needed to address generalizability issues regarding samples and hypothetical stimuli.

Practical implications

These findings offer recommendations to help practitioners design effective marketing communications about CRM practice for target markets.

Originality/value

To the authors best knowledge, the current study is the first attempt to explore the crucial role of SRC, presentation mode and their interaction on purchase intention toward CRM-enhanced products.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Keren Dali and Nadia Caidi

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and perceptions of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and perceptions of the field with an eye on discerning the best ways to build and develop the recruitment narrative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reached out to 57 LIS graduate programs in Canada and the USA accredited by the American Library Association through a Web-based survey; the questions presented a combination of multiple-choice, short-answer and open-ended questions and generated a wealth of quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The online survey has disclosed that students may not have an in-depth understanding of current trends, the diversity of LIS professions and the wider applications of their education. A significant disconnect exists in how the goals of LIS education are seen by certain groups of practitioners, students and faculty members.

Originality/value

Creating a program narrative for the purposes of recruitment and retention, departments should not only capitalize on the reach of the internet and the experiences of successful practitioners. They should also ensure that faculty know their students’ personal backgrounds, that students empathize with demands of contemporary academia and that a promotional message connects pragmatic educational goals to broader social applications. By exposing and embracing the complexity of LIS education and practice, the paper chooses a discursive path to start a conversation among major stakeholders.

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Keren Semyonov-Tal

The purpose of this study is to capture the variety of issues that concern patients and to examine the extent to which personal characteristics of patients, such as education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to capture the variety of issues that concern patients and to examine the extent to which personal characteristics of patients, such as education, ethnicity, age, gender and conditions of hospitalisation, influence the tendency to “express (negative) voice” and raise “critical views”.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data obtained from the 2014 Survey of Health Satisfaction in Israel, the study focuses on patients' responses to an open-ended question regarding the medical care experience in hospitals.

Findings

The analysis reveals that “the voice of patients” spreads across a wide variety of issues, including the physical condition of the hospital and caregiver behaviour. Multivariate regression models show that subgroups with greater access to social and economic resources (i.e. in Israel, individuals who are Jewish), academics, women and younger patients are more likely to express critical voice regarding the hospitalisation experience. Likewise, inferior hospitalisation conditions are likely to increase expression of negative “voice” and criticism.

Originality/value

The findings underscore the importance and value of open-ended questions in evaluating healthcare satisfaction, suggesting that the likelihood of expressing critical voice is higher among patients of high socio-economic status – perhaps because they are more likely to expect, demand and feel entitled to high-quality care. Likewise, inferior hospitalisation conditions increase the critical voice.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Michal Biron, Keren Turgeman-Lupo and Oz Levy

Much of what we know about work from home (WFH) is based on data collected in routine times, where WFH is applied on a partial and voluntary basis. This study leverages the…

Abstract

Purpose

Much of what we know about work from home (WFH) is based on data collected in routine times, where WFH is applied on a partial and voluntary basis. This study leverages the conditions of mandatory WFH imposed by COVID-19 lockdowns to shed new light on factors that relate to well-being and performance among employees who WFH. Specifically, the authors explore how boundary control and push–pull factors (constraints and benefits that employees associate with WFH) interact to shape employees' exhaustion and goal setting/prioritization.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were administered in Israel and in the USA to 577 employees in “teleworkable” roles who were mandated to WFH shortly after the COVID-19 outbreak (March–April 2020).

Findings

(1) Boundary control is negatively related to exhaustion and positively related to goal setting/prioritization. (2) These associations are weakened by perceptions of high WFH constraints (push factors). (3) WFH benefits (pull factors) attenuate the moderating effect of WFH constraints.

Practical implications

Organizations may benefit from identifying and boosting the saliency of WFH benefits, while considering and remedying WFH constraints.

Originality/value

The authors contribute theoretically by integrating push–pull factors into the discussion about WFH and boundary management. We also make a contextual contribution by drilling down into the specificities of nonvoluntary WFH. The expected upward trends in nonvoluntary WFH rates underscore the need to understand factors that improve outcomes among individuals who lack agency in the decision to WFH.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Rinat Arviv Elyashiv and Michal Levi-Keren

The present study focused on an incubator model for the absorption of beginning teachers into the education system. This new model is based on the cooperative approach. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study focused on an incubator model for the absorption of beginning teachers into the education system. This new model is based on the cooperative approach. The study examined mentoring perceptions among mentors. More specifically, the study investigated how mentors perceive the incubator and how mentors view the support provided to beginning teachers, as well as the contribution mentoring makes to fostering mentors' own sense of efficacy and professional development. These aspects were examined in comparison to the traditional dyadic model.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on quantitative and qualitative methods. In the quantitative study, 92 mentors working in incubators and 382 mentors working in a traditional dyadic setting responded to a self-report questionnaire. In the qualitative study, 28 mentors who were part of an incubator were interviewed.

Findings

The research findings indicate that the incubators create a dual effect of development and constitute a mantle of support that impacts the mentoring process, positions that as a dialogic–communal process and at the same time contributes to the professional development of both the beginning teachers and mentors.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the theoretical and practical contribution of the incubators as a new model for inducting beginning teachers into the profession.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Kishore Gopalakrishna Pillai, Michael Brusco, Ronald Goldsmith and Charles Hofacker

This paper aims to introduce knowledge discrimination to consumer research. It also examines the antecedent effects of objective knowledge and confidence in knowledge on consumer…

1384

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce knowledge discrimination to consumer research. It also examines the antecedent effects of objective knowledge and confidence in knowledge on consumer knowledge discrimination. Research in psychology has sought to distinguish between calibration and discrimination, two related skills in probabilistic judgments. Though consumer research has sought to examine knowledge calibration, the construct of knowledge discrimination has not attracted any attention.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on three studies which use a cross-sectional design using a structured questionnaire. The hypotheses are tested using regression. In addition, the paper also reports the results of an experimental study.

Findings

The paper finds that the objective knowledge has a positive effect on discrimination. But confidence in knowledge does not have a consistent effect on discrimination. The paper also finds that feedback improves discrimination.

Research limitations/implications

The study adds a new dimension to the examination of metaknowledge and metacognitions in the consumer domain.

Practical implications

The study suggests some ways in which companies/government agencies can improve consumer knowledge discrimination.

Social implications

Knowledge discrimination is expected to reduce consumer vulnerability and enhance consumer competence.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine knowledge discrimination in the consumer domain. Prior research has observed that there could be a trade-off between calibration and discrimination. Hence, the study of knowledge discrimination can inform the study of knowledge calibration.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2019

Keren Dali and Lindsay McNiff

At the turn of the twenty-first century, academic libraries revived their tradition of working with readers, which resulted in a surge of publications in this area. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

At the turn of the twenty-first century, academic libraries revived their tradition of working with readers, which resulted in a surge of publications in this area. However, the nature and thematic coverage of these publications has not changed dramatically in the past 18 years, signaling little advancement in the reach and scope of this professional activity. This paper aims to address the following research problem: What do citation patterns reveal about reading research and practice in academic libraries and do they point to interdisciplinary research and the presence of an evidence base or do they carry a mark of an inward disciplinary orientation?

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative exploratory study, also involving descriptive statistics, that uses bibliographic and citation analysis as a method.

Findings

The study discovers a disconnect between the diversity of interdisciplinary research cited in the published work on reading in academic libraries and the sameness of respective professional practices; it describes a relatively small community of reading researchers in academic libraries, emerging as leaders who can change the direction and scope of reading practices; and it highlights a preference of academic librarians for relying on interdisciplinary knowledge about reading over building on the readers’ advisory experience of public librarians.

Originality/value

Translating the incredible wealth of interdisciplinary reading knowledge possessed by academic librarians into practical applications promises to advance and diversify reading practices in academic libraries. One method that could aid in this effort is more intentional learning from the readers’ advisory practices of public librarians.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Dmitry Shlapentokh

Looks at the reasons for the collapse of both regimes and considers the importance of repression with these developments. Contrasts the methods of Imperial Russia with the…

Abstract

Looks at the reasons for the collapse of both regimes and considers the importance of repression with these developments. Contrasts the methods of Imperial Russia with the Bolsheviks looking at Court proceedings, prison conditions, education and propaganda in prison, exile and the secret police. Concludes that whilst social support is usually seen as essential for survival of a system, repression is not regarded as a positive element but can become the method for a system’s survival and stability.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Keren Dali

Drawing on the survey of Spanish-speaking immigrant and migrant readers in Canada and the US, this study pursues three goals: (1) examine the image of the library held by these…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the survey of Spanish-speaking immigrant and migrant readers in Canada and the US, this study pursues three goals: (1) examine the image of the library held by these readers and trace the change of this image after the international migration; (2) use the study findings to revise and update the currently existing typologies of the image of the library; and (3) understand ethical and effective research practices in the studies of immigrant/migrant communities whereby researchers are external to communities in question.

Design/methodology/approach

The data about immigrant/migrant readers were collected through a self-administered survey questionnaire that was available both in print and electronically, both in Spanish and English. The data analysis was guided by hermeneutic phenomenology, as explicated in the article. Theoretical examination of the image of the library relied on the earlier typology developed by V. Stelmakh.

Findings

The study elucidates perceptions of libraries and librarians in both North America and countries of origin held by Spanish-speaking immigrant/migrant readers, and highlights changes that occur in the image of the library as readers move across geographic borders. Building on the empirical data, the article develops a new typology of the image of the library. It also offers insight into ethical and effective ways of engaging with immigrant communities that should be upheld by researchers from outside the communities in question.

Originality/value

It is the first known study that systematically traces the changes in the image of the library which occur alongside geographic and sociocultural migrations. It is also the first known study that focuses specifically on readers rather than library users in general. The new typology consists of four different elements – the cultural image; the functional image; the humanistic image; and the ideological image of the library – and is accompanied by detailed definitions of each.

1 – 10 of 246