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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2017

Katri Kauppi and Claire Hannibal

Firms are increasingly held accountable for the welfare of workers across entire supply chains and so it is surprising that standard forms of governance for socially…

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1964

Abstract

Purpose

Firms are increasingly held accountable for the welfare of workers across entire supply chains and so it is surprising that standard forms of governance for socially sustainable supply chain management have not yet emerged. Assessment initiatives have begun to develop as a proxy measure of social sustainable supply chain management. This research aims to examine how social sustainability assessment initiatives instigate and use institutional pressures to drive third-party accreditation as the legitimate means of demonstrating social sustainability in a global supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten assessment initiatives focused on assuring social sustainability across supply chains are examined. Data are collected through interviews with senior managers and publicly available secondary material.

Findings

The findings show how the social sustainability assessment initiatives act by instigating institutional pressures indirectly rather than directly. Coercive pressures are the most prevalent and are exerted through consumer and compliance requirements. The notion of pressures operating as a chain is proposed, and the recognition that actors within and outside of a supply chain are crucial to the institutionalization of social sustainability is discussed.

Originality/value

Studies on sustainable supply chain management often focus on how companies sense and act upon institutional pressures. To add to the extant body of knowledge, this study focuses on the sources of the pressures and demonstrates how assessment initiatives use coercive, normative and mimetic pressures to drive the adoption of social sustainability assessment in supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Virpi Turkulainen, Katri Kauppi and Emma Nermes

While classical operations strategy research argues that manufacturing organizations should be managed in line with the operational strategic priorities, recent studies…

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1065

Abstract

Purpose

While classical operations strategy research argues that manufacturing organizations should be managed in line with the operational strategic priorities, recent studies have brought up potential institutional explanations for adoption of various managerial practices, including supply chain management practices. The key point in the institutional argument is that organizations are especially affected by other organizations; imitation and isomorphism are a critical part of organizational behavior. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the institutional argument in explaining the use of supplier integration mechanisms – one of the focal management practices in today’s organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors assess empirically the extent to which various economic institutional factors explain the use of supplier integration mechanisms in manufacturing plants with a multi-country and multi-industry survey sample.

Findings

The results indicate that institutional explanations play a significant role in explaining supplier integration. The findings suggest that further emphasis on building research around the institutional argument in various areas of supply chain and operations management is important.

Originality/value

As research on supply chain integration – including supplier integration – has focused on its performance implications, more research on the antecedents to integration is needed. This study provides a test of institutional theory as an antecedent to supplier integration.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Katri Kauppi and Davide Luzzini

Increasing amount of empirical research in operations and supply chain management is using institutional theory as its theoretical lens. Yet, a common scale to measure the…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing amount of empirical research in operations and supply chain management is using institutional theory as its theoretical lens. Yet, a common scale to measure the three institutional pressures – coercive, mimetic and normative – is lacking. Many studies use proxies or a single, grouped, construct of external pressures which present methodological challenges. This study aims to present the development of multi-item scales to measure institutional pressures (in a purchasing context).

Design/methodology/approach

First, items were generated based on the theoretical construct definitions. These items were then tested through academic sorting and an international survey. The first empirical testing failed to produce reliable and valid scales, and further refinement and analysis revealed that coercive pressure splits into two separate constructs. A second q-sorting was then conducted with purchasing practitioners, followed by another survey in Italy to verify the new measurement scale for four institutional pressures.

Findings

The multimethod and multistage measurement development reveals that empirically the three institutional pressures actually turn into four pressures. The theoretical construct of coercive pressure splits into two distinct constructs: coercive market pressure and coercive regulatory pressure.

Originality/value

The results of the paper, namely, the measurement scales, are an important theoretical and methodological contribution to future empirical research. They present a much-needed measurement for these theoretical constructs increasingly used in management research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Weimu You, Asta Salmi and Katri Kauppi

This paper aims to analyze the roles that African suppliers play in global value chains and the strategies that foreign firms adopt to integrate African firms into their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the roles that African suppliers play in global value chains and the strategies that foreign firms adopt to integrate African firms into their supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research of this paper is based on a multiple case study and on interview data of foreign buyers and their entry into African supply markets: five Finnish companies and five Chinese companies were interviewed in 2014-2015.

Findings

The authors find that Finnish firms make relatively small investments and start sourcing operations on a small scale, whereas Chinese firms are running large infrastructural projects, relying on local sourcing. African firms typically only play modest roles with little value capture in the chain, supplying raw materials and simple products. The African infrastructural and cultural context makes it challenging for foreign firms to provide local suppliers with more strategic roles in their chains, thus hindering integration of local firms into global value chains.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to offer a comparison of Finnish (Western) and Chinese (other emerging economy) firms’ sourcing from Africa and provides understanding of the role of African suppliers in current value chains. The authors offer a qualitative exploration of why companies invest in African suppliers and of the scope of African presence in global value chains.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Alistair Brandon-Jones and Katri Kauppi

Despite the widespread organisational adoption of e-procurement systems, we continue to witness disappointing performance outcomes from their implementation. This can be…

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3329

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the widespread organisational adoption of e-procurement systems, we continue to witness disappointing performance outcomes from their implementation. This can be explained largely by the failure of many organisations to translate the initial adoption decision, made at an organisational level, into individual-level acceptance of e-procurement by an organisation’s employees. The purpose of this paper is to examine the key antecedents of the technology acceptance model (TAM) for employees expected to use e-procurement systems in their day-to-day activities.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors apply and extend the TAM to examine the factors that influence the acceptance of e-procurement by individual employees. The authors’ focus is on the potential role of user-perceived e-procurement quality dimensions as the antecedents to the TAM’s cognitive mechanisms of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. The structural equation model uses the survey data collected from 139 e-procurement users at a university in the Netherlands.

Findings

The results confirm the core TAM relationships within an e-procurement context. Extending the TAM model to explore the antecedents, the authors find that the e-procurement quality dimensions of processing, usability, and professionalism impact the levels of individual employee e-procurement acceptance. Interestingly, the system-level dimensions (processing and usability) appear to play a greater role than the support dimensions (professionalism) in these cognitive mechanisms.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that the need for e-procurement training and on-going support may be lessened by initial effective design covering system navigation and system usability and by ensuring that an e-procurement system has expedient information and product flows between the buyer and supplier.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to explore the TAM and, more critically, its antecedents within an e-procurement context. It is also the first to empirically validate this extended model. Finally, by shifting the focus from the more typical organisational-level adoption to an individual employee acceptance unit of analysis, the authors provide a better understanding of how organisations can gain the most from investments in e-procurement and other similar e-supply chain management technologies.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Suvituulia Taponen and Katri Kauppi

The purpose of this paper is to compare service outsourcing decisions between public and private organizations and against a theoretical decision-making framework to both…

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3794

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare service outsourcing decisions between public and private organizations and against a theoretical decision-making framework to both understand differences across the sectors and to provide an outsourcing framework more suitable specifically for outsourcing (and for the public sector).

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies, i.e. a study of phenomena (here outsourcing process) at various sites is used as an approach.

Findings

Findings indicate that public sector organizations are trailing behind private sector organizations in how the decision-making process is conducted and resourced. The authors suggest regular evaluation of service functions internally as a starting point for the outsourcing service decision-making process. Additionally, the market analysis should be done prior to cost analysis and benchmarking as the availability of suppliers more qualified than the internal process defines the make or buy decision.

Research limitations/implications

The newly developed framework based on empirical evidence includes the following phases: regular evaluation of service functions, market analysis, cost analysis and benchmarking and evaluating relevant service activities. Applying the framework improves the efficient delivery of outsourced public services and brings public sector outsourcing closer to the professionalism currently present in the private sector.

Originality/value

Choosing between in-house and outsourced service delivery is a fundamental decision in both private and public sector organizations. Previous outsourcing research has mostly focused on the private sector, with limited focus on the public sector’s outsourcing processes, yet understanding of the service outsourcing process is important in ensuring organizational competitiveness and cost efficiency.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Claire Moxham and Katri Kauppi

This paper aims to use organisational theories to frame research questions examining how to embed social sustainability in supply chain management (SCM) by focusing on…

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2600

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use organisational theories to frame research questions examining how to embed social sustainability in supply chain management (SCM) by focusing on fair trade.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on previous organisational theory review papers in SCM, institutional theory and the extended resource-based view have been used as theoretical lenses to develop research questions for further studies.

Findings

The authors developed seven research questions that enable and encourage the further examination of the factors impacting fair trade supply chains, as well as identify approaches to improve social sustainability in SCM practice.

Social implications

As the aim of fair trade is to rebalance inequities inherent in North–South trading relationships, further work in this area has the potential for positive economic, environmental and social impact.

Originality/value

The paper discusses two key themes: whether fair trade is changing SCM practices, and whether fair trade is a source of competitive advantage in supply chains. Using established theory to develop research questions encourages further examination of this important topic.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Katri Kauppi

Increasing empirical evidence suggests organizational actions are not always driven by economic efficiency considerations, contrary to the rational decision making…

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4998

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing empirical evidence suggests organizational actions are not always driven by economic efficiency considerations, contrary to the rational decision making viewpoint dominant in the field. Institutional theory, examining the causes of isomorphism within organizations, provides an alternative viewpoint to the adoption of strategies and practices in managing operations and supply chains. Applications have so far been limited to few topics, such as quality management and adoption of electronic tools. This study aims to contribute to an increased understanding of the theory's explanatory value in the field by presenting central research avenues yet unexplored.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a review of the past institutional theory studies in the field. Important new contexts and research directions are then identified with the aim to increase understanding of how institutional factors operate in the field. Finally, a critical evaluation of empirical data collection and construct formation in the past and future studies is provided.

Findings

The paper identifies three major institutional theory related research avenues in the field with a potential for theoretical and practical contributions. Two of these – role of uncertainty and relationships between institutional pressures – serve to contribute to how the theory applies to different operational contexts. The third one recommends a reflection on the role of academia as a source and target of institutional pressures.

Originality/value

The discussion, debate and analysis offered is intended to stimulate and drive further institutional theory studies in the field with an increasing scope as well as more refined measurement in empirical work.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Katri Kauppi, Claire Moxham and David Bamford

Research related to operations management (OM) in the sport industry is underdeveloped, despite sport being a continued context of study in other management disciplines…

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2701

Abstract

Purpose

Research related to operations management (OM) in the sport industry is underdeveloped, despite sport being a continued context of study in other management disciplines. Most studies on the topic are conducted largely in isolation and not linked to the wider OM theory base. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the few studies conducted and develop a detailed research agenda to encourage future research in this interesting, important and topical context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a comprehensive systematic literature review methodology to synthesize the research on sport OM to date. Gaps within the literature are identified and avenues for future research to drive improved performance in multiple aspects of sport OM are suggested.

Findings

Examination of the literature shows sports OM to be underdeveloped, with little cumulative learning between existing studies and weak linkages between sport and OM research. To develop the topic further there is a clear requirement for more theory-based research as well as more rigorous empirical testing. The sport industry has special characteristics that differentiate it from the overall service industry and call for targeted research.

Practical implications

Sport today is a major business. The industry also contributes to individual health and well-being. This paper suggests several research directions designed to improve off-field performance in sport operations.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to identify and synthesize the separate studies that have been conducted on OM in sport to date in order to provide a multifaceted research agenda aimed at developing both theoretical and managerial contributions within this important yet under researched area.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Katri Kauppi, Alistair Brandon‐Jones, Stefano Ronchi and Erik M. van Raaij

The paper examines the moderating role of a purchasing function's absorptive capacity (AC) on the relationship between the use of electronic purchasing tools and category…

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1821

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the moderating role of a purchasing function's absorptive capacity (AC) on the relationship between the use of electronic purchasing tools and category level purchasing performance. The authors argue that an e‐purchasing tool may not in itself positively influence performance unless combined with AC as a human interface to maximise its information and transactional improvement potential.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected from 297 procurement executives of large companies in ten countries are analysed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and hierarchical moderated regression.

Findings

The results demonstrate few significant direct effects of e‐purchasing tools on category performance. All performance measures studied are enhanced when dimensions of AC and their interactions with the e‐purchasing tools are added. Specifically, buyer competence, manager competence and communications climate have performance‐enhancing effects. In some cases, AC on its own appears to increase performance more than e‐tools.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to study the moderating effects of AC on the relationship between e‐purchasing tool usage and category performance. Its findings support the view that simply implementing technology does not lead to performance improvements, but that a human interface is required to maximise the information and transactional improvement potential of e‐purchasing tools.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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