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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Atif Saleem Butt, Syed Hamad Hassan Shah and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge hiding affects buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge hiding affects buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multiple case study methodology. Overall, 26 semi-structured interviews (13 dyadic interviews) with managers of buying and supplying firms (who have been a victim of knowledge hiding) were undertaken.

Findings

Based on comprehensive data analysis, results reveal seven factors that adversely affect buyer-supplier relationship performance (lack of trust, lack of cooperation and lack of commitment). In addition, results reveal that such factors reduced the firm’s business performance in terms of low-quality products, increased lead time and higher costs.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioral patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings from this study to understand how knowledge hiding in a buyer-supplier relationship adversely affects a buyer-supplier relationship performance.

Originality/value

A considerable weakness in buyer-supplier relationship literature is a need for a study examining how knowledge hiding harms buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain. This paper addresses this gap.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Jitesh Thakkar, Arun Kanda and S.G. Deshmukh

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology for evaluating and comparing supply chain relationships, specifically when, small and medium scale enterprise (SME…

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3888

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology for evaluating and comparing supply chain relationships, specifically when, small and medium scale enterprise (SME) is considered as focal company.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a mathematical solution based on interpretive structural modeling and graph theory matrix to determine the supply chain relationship index. The application is demonstrated for the case of Indian automotive SMEs based on the secondary data reported.

Findings

Solution determines supply chain buyer‐supplier index for upstream and downstream. Based on which coefficient of similarity and dissimilarity are determined to evaluate the net pool of buyer‐supplier relationship on focal small and medium scale automotive component manufacturing industry.

Practical implications

Developed approach and results will help SMEs in general and Indian automobile component manufacturing SMEs to rethink on their supply chain relationships and identify the reasons behind their present failures and establish the criteria for win‐win partnership.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the following issues: how buyer‐supplier relationships can be quantified and the impact measured for the present working of focal SME; how SMEs can convince upstream and down stream supply chain players to initiate improvement on some dimensions of buyer‐supplier relationships; and on what basis change in relationships (from transactional to alliance) can be made to minimize the supply chain pressure on a focal company.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Zahra Seyedghorban, Dayna Simpson and Margaret Jekanyika Matanda

The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamics of trust creation in an early buyer–supplier relationship phase at the interpersonal level. The authors use a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamics of trust creation in an early buyer–supplier relationship phase at the interpersonal level. The authors use a brand-based communication approach to investigate the trust–risk–commitment link.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 204 senior managers in small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) in Australia were collected and analyzed.

Findings

Results indicate that ability, credibility, benevolence and persona of supplier brand representatives (SBRs) relate significantly to a buyers’ trust in SBR, leading to diminished perceived risk, and increased relationship commitment between the parties. These findings support the importance of using individual representatives who are able to broadcast their supplier’s brand values, and increase trust in exploratory buyer–supplier relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This research focused on SMEs in Australia, investigating exploratory phase of the interpersonal relationships. Future research can investigate large firms interacting in different relationship phases in the light of brand-based communication.

Practical implications

The study describes several strategies for both buying and supplying firms to use, to best use brand-based communication as a means to build trust in the early phases of buyer–supplier relationships.

Originality/value

Prior research has focused on interorganizational trust and established or mature buyer–supplier relationships. This study investigates the initial phase of buyer–supplier relationships, and at the interpersonal exchange level. It also incorporates a role for brand-based communication in the buyer–supplier relationship which has received limited attention in the literature.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

J.O. Tantoush, F. Lettice and H.K. Chan

The purpose of this paper is to explore buyer‐supplier relationships in the Libyan oil industry during and following the sanction era. This paper, utilising four largely…

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1003

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore buyer‐supplier relationships in the Libyan oil industry during and following the sanction era. This paper, utilising four largely validated critical relationship parameters, seeks to flag important buyer‐supplier relationship insights.

Design/methodology/approach

Desk research is undertaken to explore the selected themes of trust, co‐operation, commitment and communication, which are critical to effective dyadic buyer‐supplier relationships. Subsequently, in‐depth interviews were conducted with five key personnel of five Libyan oil companies to examine the impact of sanctions on the selected themes in relation to their buyer‐supplier relationships.

Findings

The results highlight interesting differentials between the two explored areas in relation to the four selected themes: trust, co‐operation, commitment and communication. The results indicate that there is a significant gap in understanding the impact of sanctions on the buyer‐supplier relationship.

Practical implications

This paper is of practical use to academics and practitioners who wish to understand the impact on and implications of sanctions on dyadic buyer‐supplier relationships in a developing country. It is also useful to government officials and the oil industry in gaining insights into the effects of sanctions on an economy with significant reliance on the oil industry.

Originality/value

There are extensive studies on the key themes of dyadic buyer‐supplier relationships. However, there is a gap in understanding the impact of sanctions on buyer‐supplier relationship behaviours. The findings in this paper therefore contribute to bridging this gap.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Takaharu Kawai, Junya Sakaguchi and Nobumasa Shimizu

The paper aims to describe the changes in buyer-supplier relationships among Japanese companies at the early 2000s, focusing on two critical features; long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the changes in buyer-supplier relationships among Japanese companies at the early 2000s, focusing on two critical features; long-term relationships and information sharing. In particular, the paper investigates the relationship between benefits from information-sharing activities within buyer-supplier relationships and the stability of these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a questionnaire based on prior research related to Japanese companies and undertakes a questionnaire survey of 353 Japanese manufacturing companies (which belong to the machinery, electrical/electronics, transportation equipment, and precision industries) in 2002.

Findings

Although Japanese companies have been considered to have close relationships with their partners, the paper finds only a small proportion of buyers were willing to share sensitive information with their suppliers and/or expected to continue long-term relationships with them. In addition, an examination of factors relating to buyers' performance shows that receiving benefits from inter-organizational information-sharing activities (attending suppliers' meetings, sending engineers to suppliers, and proposing cost saving ideas) could affect buyers' incentives to sustain long-term relationships with their suppliers.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence of the changing nature of the buyer-supplier relationship in Japanese manufacturing companies. Specifically, the main contribution of this research is to provide empirical evidence indicating that the benefit from buyer-supplier relationships has an effect on the governance structure of these relationships.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Jiun‐Sheng Chris Lin and Yun‐Chi Chang

Given the increasing number of new products competing for limited shelf space, retailer acceptance of new products is crucial to both retailers and suppliers. However…

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3625

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increasing number of new products competing for limited shelf space, retailer acceptance of new products is crucial to both retailers and suppliers. However, limited empirical research has investigated what drives retailers to accept or decline a new product offering. Extant research on retailers' new product acceptance focuses mainly on product and market factors. Despite the growing importance of buyer‐supplier relationships in new product marketing, few studies have addressed their influence on retailers' acceptance of new products. This study aims to fill the research gap by proposing a model of retailers' new product acceptance that incorporates the buyer‐supplier relationship perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops an integrated research framework assessing the determinants of retailers' acceptance of new products. Four constructs were derived from the literature on buyer‐supplier relationship marketing and new products literature to investigate their influence on the retailer's decision to adopt a new product. The constructs include buyer‐seller relationship factors (relationship intensity and channel motivation) and non‐relationship factors (product advantage and market competitiveness). Hypotheses were developed and tested with a sample of retailers.

Findings

Owing to the lack of appropriate existing scales for the four constructs that influence retailers' adoption of new products, this study developed and validated multiple‐item scales through psychometric scale development procedures. Hypotheses were then tested with ordinary least squares regression analysis, and all factors were found to have a positive relationship with the retailer's acceptance of new products. Results further show that buyer‐supplier relationship factors are stronger predictors of retailer new product adoption than traditional non‐relationship factors.

Research limitations/implications

This research represents an attempt to incorporate the buyer‐supplier relationship into the process of retailer new product acceptance. Future research directions are discussed, with an emphasis on two‐way viewpoints, multiple supplier choice, and product sales performance after acceptance.

Practical implications

The willingness of a retailer to stock a new product does not depend solely on product and market factors. In an age of intense competition and seemingly limitless product choices, suppliers must also consider the implications of the buyer‐supplier relationship before entering negotiations with retailers regarding the stocking of a new product.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first study to propose and empirically test a research model that incorporates the literature regarding both buyer‐supplier relationship marketing and new product literature. Suppliers can strengthen their competitive advantage by understanding and enhancing their performance in these factors.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Jin Su

The purpose of this paper is to investigate performance outcomes of strategic sourcing, specifically examining how strategic sourcing affects buyer‐supplier relationship

Downloads
4897

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate performance outcomes of strategic sourcing, specifically examining how strategic sourcing affects buyer‐supplier relationship, supplier evaluation, and sourcing performance from the buying firm's perspective in the context of the US textile and apparel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study provides an empirical investigation of a theory‐based model integrating the resource‐based view and the relational view of strategic management. The model is tested using data from 180 US textile and apparel firms by structural equation modeling.

Findings

The survey results indicate that strategic sourcing significantly impacts buyer‐supplier relationships, supplier evaluation, and sourcing performance of buying companies. The study also shows that supplier evaluation significantly influences buyer‐supplier relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the data are from a specific industry, the generalizability of current findings to other industries may require additional investigation.

Practical implications

Sourcing becomes a key strategic consideration for textile and apparel firms to sustain or improve their competitiveness.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by developing a research model based on a multi‐theoretical perspective and conducting a large‐scale empirical survey in the textile and apparel industry and analyzing the model by structural equation modeling. The dynamic textile and apparel industry is a classical representation of global supply chain, characterized by the industry's significant contribution to the world economy and international trade, the extremely worldwide spread supply network, and the tremendous competition in global market. Examining strategic sourcing's influences in this important industry provides many valuable implications for industrial practitioners.

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Shereen Nassar, Tarek Kandil, Merve Er Kara and Abhijeet Ghadge

The purpose of this paper is to examine the automotive product recall risk in terms of social sustainability performance and to evaluate the role of buyer‒supplier

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the automotive product recall risk in terms of social sustainability performance and to evaluate the role of buyer‒supplier relationships in improving social sustainability during product recall crises.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-methodology approach is used to empirically analyse the interrelationship between the proposed constructs and enablers of the buyer‒supplier relationship. Structural equation modelling and interpretive structural modelling are followed to analyse the data gathered thorough a questionnaire survey of 204 executives and interviews with 15 managers from the automotive industry.

Findings

The results of the study provide evidence regarding the impact of the responsible buyer‒supplier relationship on customer recall concerns and the social sustainability performance of supply chains (SCs). This study also leads to the development of a conceptual model, providing a relationship between the three key concepts used in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Following social sustainability principles, this study addresses the importance of developing strong, responsible relational ties with suppliers to reduce vehicle recalls or successfully recover from a product recall crisis.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by providing theoretical and empirical insights for developing socially responsible SCs and confirming the role of the buyer‒supplier governance mechanism during product recalls in the context of the automotive industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Chin‐Chun Hsu, Vijay R. Kannan, Keah‐Choon Tan and G. Keong Leong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of information sharing capability on buyer‐supplier relationships and firm performance. It is proposed that information…

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7976

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of information sharing capability on buyer‐supplier relationships and firm performance. It is proposed that information sharing capability, the integration of a firm's information/decision systems and business processes with those of supply chain partners, is an antecedent of collaborative buyer‐supplier relationships, defined in terms of supply chain and relationship architecture. Further, it is proposed that these relationships positively impact a firm's market and financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses multiple linear regression to analyze a set of survey data from the USA, Europe and New Zealand.

Findings

Results demonstrate positive relationships between information sharing capability and buyer‐supplier relationships, and between relationships and performance.

Research limitations/implications

Information sharing capability and buyer‐supplier relationships are complex, multi dimensional constructs. While this research highlights their role in driving performance, further study is required to more fully capture their impact and to understand the implications for situational factors such as industry sector and transaction type.

Practical implications

Results from the study provide academics and policymakers with insights into key information sharing constructs related to the development of buyer‐supplier relationships. These provide guidance in developing the infrastructure to support such relationships.

Originality/value

This study adds to the extant literature by examining the dimensions of information sharing related to buyer‐supplier relationships and performance.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Arthur Ahimbisibwe, Moses Muhwezi and Sudi Nangoli

This study sought to examine the extent to which outsourced contracts, buyer-supplier trust and supplier opportunistic behavior explain supplier performance in Ugandan…

Abstract

This study sought to examine the extent to which outsourced contracts, buyer-supplier trust and supplier opportunistic behavior explain supplier performance in Ugandan Public Procuring and Disposing Entities (PDEs). This study was prompted by reports of long lead times, failure to match specifications, late deliveries, poor quality of services delivered, contract violations, and increased supplier cheating. Cross sectional data from 116 central government PDEs concerning outsourced contracts was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Hierarchical regression was used to indicate what happens to a model that was developed as part of this research as different predictor variables are introduced. The findings revealed that outsourced contracts, buyer-supplier trust, and supplier opportunistic behavior are significant predictors of supplier performance. The study has both managerial and policy implications which are discussed in this paper.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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