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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Katie King

A research project exploring emerging student needs explored six aspects of student life: living, learning, working, playing, connecting and participating. Learning is explored…

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Abstract

Purpose

A research project exploring emerging student needs explored six aspects of student life: living, learning, working, playing, connecting and participating. Learning is explored here. New learning models and approaches and changing student expectations could lead to dramatic reshaping of the higher education landscape. The purpose of this paper is to summarize two scenarios about the learning domain from the Student Needs 2025+ project and highlight implications for the future of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified version of the University of Houston’s “Framework Foresight” method was used to explore the future of six aspects of future student life.

Findings

Students will increasingly gravitate toward new learning models focused on experiential learning, taking advantage of advanced “edutech” and aimed at achieving specific outcomes. They will seek personalized learning approaches specific to their needs, and they will be increasingly willing to look outside the traditional higher education system if needed. The landscape will be characterized by power struggles: between the traditional players and the new entrants, between institutions and students and between competing philosophies of learning.

Research limitations/implications

In terms of research limitations, the paper is focused on the needs of students and does not purport to be an exhaustive analysis of all the issues influencing higher education. It views the future of higher education through the lens of students and their emerging needs.

Practical implications

The paper is intended for educators, researchers and administrators to provide insight on how the needs of students, their key customers, are evolving.

Originality/value

This research explores student life in its totality as way to more accurately identify student needs in the future.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Eric Resnis, Katie Gibson, Arianne Hartsell‐Gundy and Masha Misco

The purpose of this case study, created by a faculty learning community (FLC) on research fluency, is to investigate students' information literacy practices at Miami University…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study, created by a faculty learning community (FLC) on research fluency, is to investigate students' information literacy practices at Miami University, including information search process, preparation, differences in students' information literacy skill levels, and how well they transfer these skills outside coursework.

Design/methodology/approach

Faculty and librarians designed a survey of about 60 questions, which were given to 300 students in faculty's classes by librarian FLC members.

Findings

FLC members discovered where perceptions among professors, librarians, and students were similar, and where they differed.

Practical implications

Influenced by the findings, participating faculty made changes to the course plans and included additional assignments to make the process of research more explicit.

Originality/value

While there are similar studies about information literacy, the Miami University study is distinct in that it reports on collaboration with faculty and makes use of their perceptions of students.

Details

New Library World, vol. 111 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Katherine Prince

This paper reflects on the author’s experience of an education foundation’s developing a robust and nationally recognized futures studies practice over a period of 14 years. In so…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reflects on the author’s experience of an education foundation’s developing a robust and nationally recognized futures studies practice over a period of 14 years. In so doing, this paper aims to inform other futures studies practitioners about the kinds of considerations that can be encountered, and which must be managed, in starting, developing and maintaining a futures studies practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Organized around KnowledgeWorks’ triennial forecasts on the future of learning, the paper takes a narrative approach to describe the organization’s and the author’s future studies journeys, examining ways in which organizational learning and dynamics, as well as audience reception, affected the relative success of the study.

Findings

The paper begins by describing KnowledgeWorks’ excitement when publishing its first forecast on the future of education as a client of the institute for the future put KnowledgeWorks on the national map. It goes on to examine the organization’s capacity development in learning how to engage education audiences in exploring the future of learning, situating the study in the field of futures studies and developing internal capacity and thought leadership in the field. The paper concludes by reflecting on key aspects of KnowledgeWorks’ organizational learning; the organization’s leadership, moment and culture; and the author’s professional development journey.

Originality/value

The paper will help other future studies practitioners, along with organizations interested in considering investing in futures studies, anticipate considerations that could help them strengthen their practice or set up their organizational investment for success.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Marcia Coelho and Isabel Menezes

In the context of increasingly diverse issues that affect global society, the social responsibility dimension in higher education institutions is being called to the forefront of…

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Abstract

Purpose

In the context of increasingly diverse issues that affect global society, the social responsibility dimension in higher education institutions is being called to the forefront of change, both in the sense of rethinking their internal practices (e.g. promoting the access and progression of students from different cultural backgrounds) and in their interaction with the surrounding community (e.g. through the establishment of stronger partnerships). The USR activities and projects are considered driving forces of change for universities, but the potential that the involvement of students in this area can have, in their academic and professional capacities, is not yet sufficiently studied.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines how students from three European universities (Edinburgh, Porto and Kaunas) perceive the impact of their own involvement in the Erasmus + project ESSA – an experiential training in university social responsibility audit – through focus-group discussions.

Findings

This analysis pointed towards the role of USR projects as an opportunity for students to improve transversal competencies aligned with articulation between the three cornerstones of the university: teaching, research and third mission.

Research limitations/implications

The study rests on students' perceptions of personal change.

Practical implications

This research can help higher education institutions understand the potential of involving students in existing USR projects as a tool to promote their personal, academic and civic development.

Social implications

USR is a core mission of higher education institutions that is beneficial not only internally but also in what concerns interactions with the community and the potential for developing “public-minded alumni”.

Originality/value

This paper provides an insight into how students perceive the impact of their involvement in USR projects as unique learning spaces.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2012

Adele E. Clarke

My early life was punctuated by turning points and transformations that gradually led to a surprising and late-blooming academic career – my first “real” sociology position began…

Abstract

My early life was punctuated by turning points and transformations that gradually led to a surprising and late-blooming academic career – my first “real” sociology position began when I was 44. Here I trace six different trajectories of scholarly work which have compelled me: feminist women's health and technoscience studies; social worlds/arenas and the disciplinary emergence of reproductive sciences; the sociology of work and scientific practices; biomedicalization studies; grounded theory and situational analysis as qualitative research methods; and symbolic interaction-ists and -isms. I have circled back across them multiple times. Instead of seeing a beautifully folded origami of a life, it feels more like a crumpled wad of newspapers from various times. Upon opening and holding them up to the light in different ways, stories may be slowly discerned. I try to capture here some of the sweetness and fragility of these moments toward the end of an initially stuttering but later wondrously gratifying career.

Details

Blue-Ribbon Papers: Behind the Professional Mask: The Autobiographies of Leading Symbolic Interactionists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-747-5

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Russ Ryan, Matthew H. Baughman, Carmen J. Lawrence, Aaron W. Lipson, Richard H. Walker, Jessica Rapoport, Katie Barry and Scott Hiers

To analyze the impact of recent legislation that amended the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to expressly empower the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to seek…

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze the impact of recent legislation that amended the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to expressly empower the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to seek disgorgement in federal district court proceedings and to codify applicable statutes of limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

This article provides an overview of the authors’ prior work analyzing courts’ treatment of SEC disgorgement and summarizes how the scope of the remedy has evolved since Kokesh v. SEC (2017). Then, the article analyzes the changes to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 contained in Section 6501 the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which statutorily empowered the SEC to seek and obtain disgorgement in federal court actions. Finally, the authors discuss the impact of the legislation on the Supreme Court’s decisions in Kokesh and Liu v. SEC (2020).

Findings

The availability and appropriateness of SEC disgorgement have been the subject of vigorous debate. Just as courts began to iron out the contours of SEC disgorgement in the wake of Kokesh and Liu, Congress intervened by granting to the SEC explicit statutory authority to seek a remedy traditionally obtained at equity. In passing this legislation, Congress answered some questions that remained after Liu but also raised many new ones. These new questions will likely take years to resolve through subsequent litigation and potentially additional legislation.

Originality/value

Original, practical analysis and guidance from experienced lawyers in financial services regulatory and enforcement practices, many of whom have previously worked in the SEC’s Division of Enforcement.

Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Dunja Antunovic, Katie Taylor, Macauley Watt and Andrew D. Linden

On 2 February 2020, 99.9 million viewers learnt about the Women's Football Alliance (WFA), the largest women's American football league in the United States, when former player…

Abstract

On 2 February 2020, 99.9 million viewers learnt about the Women's Football Alliance (WFA), the largest women's American football league in the United States, when former player Katie Sowers became the first woman to coach in the Super Bowl. In the same month, the WFA announced several corporate partnerships and a new television deal with statements that connected the support for women's American football to advancing gender equity.

This chapter examines the professionalisation of women's American football in the United States through the lens of mediated visibilities. We use the term mediated visibilities, rather than media coverage, to move beyond how journalists are writing about sport (or ‘covering’ sport) and account for the complex ways in which content about women's sport circulates across producers and platforms in the digital media environment. In particular, our analysis examines the opportunities and limitations of digital media in the process of (semi-)professionalisation of women's American football.

The WFA joined the broader ‘momentum’ of women's sport in the United States as both the league's social media platforms and the sponsors aligned their messages with cultural narratives around women's sport to invoke gender equity in promoting women's American football. Moreover, the league positioned the strategy to enhance mediated visibility the sport as an integral step in the process of (semi-)professionalisation. However, the role of the WFA's digital media platforms alone appears to be limited without substantial structural change.

Details

The Professionalisation of Women’s Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-196-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Georgina L. Barnes, Alexandra Eleanor Wretham, Rosemary Sedgwick, Georgina Boon, Katie Cheesman and Omer Moghraby

Clinicians working in UK child mental health services are faced with several challenges in providing accurate assessment and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinicians working in UK child mental health services are faced with several challenges in providing accurate assessment and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Within the South London & Maudsley (SLaM) NHS Trust, community Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are developing structured pathways for assessing and diagnosing ADHD in young people. To date, these pathways have not been formally evaluated. The main aims of this evaluation are to evaluate all ADHD referrals made to the service in an 18-month period, including the number of completed assessments and proportion of children diagnosed with ADHD; and investigate adherence to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline for diagnosing ADHD in children and young people.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective data analysis was performed using service databases and electronic patient records. Adherence to the clinical guideline was measured using the NICE data collection tool for diagnosing ADHD in children and young people. All completed ADHD assessments were compared to four key recommendation points in the guideline.

Findings

Within the time frame, 146 children aged 4-17 years were referred and accepted for an ADHD assessment. Of these, 92 families opted in and were seen for an initial appointment. In total, 36 ADHD assessments were completed, of which 19 children received a diagnosis of ADHD and 17 did not. Aside from structured recording of ADHD symptoms based on ICD-10 criteria (69%) and reporting of functional impairment (75%), adherence to all guidance points was above 90%. The study also found that although a greater proportion of children referred to the service were male and identified as White, these differences narrowed upon receipt of ADHD diagnosis.

Research limitations/implications

Relationship to the existing literature is discussed in relation to the assessment process, demographic characteristics and rates of co-occurrence.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that in child mental health services, gold standard practice for diagnosing ADHD should be the adoption of clear, protocol-driven pathways to support appropriate access and treatment for young people and their families.

Originality/value

This article is unique in that it is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the first to describe and report clinician-adherence to a structured pathway for diagnosing ADHD in young people within a community CAMHS service in South London.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Katie Brown and Anna Mountford-Zimdars

The purpose of this study is twofold: to make explicit academics’ tacit knowledge of academic employment and to develop the educational research and employability skills of 12…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: to make explicit academics’ tacit knowledge of academic employment and to develop the educational research and employability skills of 12 postgraduate researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

Twelve postgraduate researchers from ten different disciplines conducted 24 semi-structured interviews (12 with early career academics, 12 with senior academics). Respondents shared the skills, experiences and attributes sought when hiring and their lived experience of being academics.

Findings

The importance given to both explicitly stated (publications, teaching experience) and implicit (values, behaviour) factors varies greatly among individual academics. There is a mismatch between stated job requirements and the realities of academic life. A students-as-partners project fosters critical engagement with these questions and offers other benefits to participants.

Research limitations/implications

Most respondents work at one research-intensive English institution, potentially limiting generalisability to teaching-led and international institutions.

Practical/implications

Researcher development programmes should make explicit the range of factors considered in hiring while also encouraging critical engagement with the realities of academic work. Through students-as-partners projects, postgraduate research students can uncover first-hand what academic life is like and what hiring committees are looking for.

Originality/value

Through involving students-as-partners, the research question changed to reflect the actual concerns of those contemplating an academic career. Students gained invaluable awareness of academic hiring and insights into academic life, as well as transferable skills.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

M. Alexander Koch, Carmen J. Lawrence, Aaron Lipson, Russ Ryan, Richard H. Walker, Jessica Rapoport and Katie Barry

To analyze the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Liu v. SEC, where the Court confronted the issue of whether the SEC can obtain disgorgement in federal district court…

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Liu v. SEC, where the Court confronted the issue of whether the SEC can obtain disgorgement in federal district court proceedings.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of the authors’ prior work analyzing courts’ treatment of SEC disgorgement and a summary of the background and opinion in Liu v. SEC. This article then focuses on the practical implications of Liu on SEC disgorgement by considering questions left open by the decision.

Findings

The Court in Liu held that the SEC is authorized to seek disgorgement as “equitable relief” as long as it “does not exceed a wrongdoer’s net profits and is awarded for victims.” But the Court left many unanswered questions, such as whether disgorged funds must always be returned to investors for disgorgement to be a permissible equitable remedy, whether the SEC can obtain joint-and-several disgorgement liability from unrelated co-defendants, what “legitimate expenses” should be deducted in disgorgement calculations, and to what extent the SEC can seek disgorgement in cases when victims are difficult to identify.

Originality/value

Original, practical guidance from experienced lawyers in financial services regulatory and enforcement practices, many of whom have previously worked in the SEC’s Division of Enforcement.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 21 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

1 – 10 of 169