Search results

1 – 10 of 36
Open Access

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Jon Talbot, David Perrin and Bob Meakin

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential reasons for the success of an innovative work-based learning (WBL) shell framework in an adverse environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential reasons for the success of an innovative work-based learning (WBL) shell framework in an adverse environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study is the experience of one programme.

Findings

Demand-led, flexible WBL programmes have to overcome a number of internal cultural and institutional barriers in order to succeed. Important requirements are likely to include effective leadership, financial viability, adherence to quality assurance, adaptability, entrepreneurialism and a cohesive community of practice incorporating these traits.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions are drawn from shared experience and are suggestive only as they are not readily susceptible to empirical verification. The authors accept that the conclusions appear speculative for some, but they suggest that in order for innovative programmes to survive, more is required than sound pedagogy.

Practical implications

Although lessons may not be directly transferable, the paper draws attention to the importance of managerial, leadership and organisational factors necessary for innovative WBL programmes to survive and develop.

Originality/value

There is some literature on why some innovative higher education programmes and institutions have failed; however, there is little on why some programmes are successful.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Jon Talbot and Andy Lilley

The purpose of this paper is to outline a small research project designed to explore the practices of the UK work-based learning (WBL) tutors in facilitating formal research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a small research project designed to explore the practices of the UK work-based learning (WBL) tutors in facilitating formal research projects in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a short questionnaire to practitioners administered electronically and a daylong workshop where issues were discussed in greater depth by participating tutors.

Findings

The main findings are that there is a degree of agreement by WBL tutors about the distinctiveness of WBL research projects; that although there is increasing use of technology to support delivery only one institution is using e-learning as the principal means of delivery; emphasis is upon a relatively small number of techniques and there is a strong preference for qualitative over quantitative methods.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the study is the relatively small number of active participants. However, this is the only study of its kind and the results offer insights into an important element of pedagogic practice in WBL.

Practical implications

The project enabled the identification of common approaches and facilitated discussion of problems shared by WBL tutors across the field. There appears to be a consensus that situated investigation exists within a different contextual framework to traditional academic dissertation projects and that the focus is therefore necessarily on generating data as the basis for active problem solving.

Originality/value

This is the only empirical study of practice in respect of facilitating research projects on WBL programmes in higher education.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Jon Talbot

The purpose of the paper is to describe the development and operation of an innovative, work based, distance delivered foundation degree developed by the University of Chester and…

812

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe the development and operation of an innovative, work based, distance delivered foundation degree developed by the University of Chester and the British Civil Service. The paper is both a case study in its own right but also the basis for a further quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the development of the programme in the broader context of UK Civil service modernisation and the application of the University of Chester's established Work Based and Integrative Studies (WBIS) framework. Important features of the programme are described including academic content, learner support, assessment and management.

Findings

The paper concludes by identifying three areas for formal evaluation. These are: the implications of employer involvement in the design and management of the programme; the differential nature of the learner experience and the factors underlying performance and the impact of the programme in meeting employer goals.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations in generalising from a particular case study. No formal research questions are posed in the paper or method suggested. Further work is necessary to develop a strategy for evaluation of the programme.

Practical implications

The conclusions are exploratory, awaiting formal evaluation.

Originality/value

The case study is of interest to educators engaged in flexible and distance work based learning. The issue of employer involvement in programme design, management and delivery is of considerable interest to those developing and delivering Foundation degrees and similar programmes. The issues in relation to the student experience are also of considerable interest to those engaged in workplace delivery. The organisational impact of the programme is of interest to employers and educators alike.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Tony Wall

387

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Dr Ruth Helyer

12

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Tony Wall

696

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Ruth Helyer

109

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sarah Tudor and Ruth Helyer

425

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1993

Jon Henderson

The UK utility markets are being privatized and customers are beinggiven choice as to whom their supplier should be. Choosing is not,however, that simple. A detailed knowledge of…

Abstract

The UK utility markets are being privatized and customers are being given choice as to whom their supplier should be. Choosing is not, however, that simple. A detailed knowledge of the market, the key players and the terminology are essential if the right choice is to be made; and the minimum price for buying electricity and gas is to be paid. Examines what is needed to succeed as a buyer in the current electricity market.

Details

Facilities, vol. 11 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of 36