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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Angela Mallett and John Naylor

The education of pupils with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) has gradually improved, due to a range of new initiatives and the introduction of the national…

254

Abstract

The education of pupils with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) has gradually improved, due to a range of new initiatives and the introduction of the national curriculum. However, it is widely recognised that some pupils have a wide range of early specific and complex needs that are not always met. This paper describes a new early curriculum for self‐development being implemented at the Shepherd School, which is unanimously supported by therapists, parents and teachers. It is suggested that, for pupils with PMLD, the new revised framework could provide a more relevant broad and balanced curriculum, fulfilling individual needs, and ultimately lead to effective access to the national curriculum.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1899

In its passage through the Grand Committee the Food Bill is being amended in a number of important particulars, and it is in the highest degree satisfactory that so much interest…

Abstract

In its passage through the Grand Committee the Food Bill is being amended in a number of important particulars, and it is in the highest degree satisfactory that so much interest has been taken in the measure by members on both sides of the House as to lead to full and free discussion. Sir Charles Cameron, Mr. Kearley, Mr. Strachey, and other members have rendered excellent service by the introduction of various amendments; and Sir Charles Cameron is especially to be congratulated upon the success which has attended his efforts to induce the Committee to accept a number of alterations the wisdom of which cannot be doubted. The provision whereby local authorities will be compelled to appoint Public Analysts, and compelled to put the Acts in force in a proper manner, and the requirement that analysts shall furnish proofs of competence of a satisfactory character to the Local Government Board, will, it cannot be doubted, be productive of good results. The fact that the Local Government Board is to be given joint authority with the Board of Agriculture in insuring that the Acts are enforced is also an amendment of considerable importance, while other amendments upon what may perhaps be regarded as secondary points unquestionably trend in the right direction. It is, however, a matter for regret that the Government have not seen their way to introduce a decisive provision with regard to the use of preservatives, or to accept an effective amendment on this point. Under existing circumstances it should be plain that the right course to follow in regard to preservatives is to insist on full and adequate disclosure of their presence and of the amounts in which they are present. It is also a matter for regret that the Government have declined to give effect to the recommendation of the Food Products Committee as to the formation of an independent and representative Court of Reference. It is true that the Board of Agriculture are to make regulations in reference to standards, after consultation with experts or such inquiry as they think fit, and that such inquiries as the Board may make will be in the nature of consultations of some kind with a committee to be appointed by the Board. There is little doubt, however, that such a committee would probably be controlled by the Somerset House Department; and as we have already pointed out, however conscientious the personnel of this Department may be—and its conscientiousness cannot be doubted—it is not desirable in the public interest that any single purely analytical institution should exercise a controlling influence in the administration of the Acts. What is required is a Court of Reference which shall be so constituted as to command the confidence of the traders who are affected by the law as well as of all those who are concerned in its application. Further comment upon the proposed legislation must be reserved until the amended Bill is laid before the House.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Modern Information Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-525-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Maurice Yolles

The systems domain maintains methodologies for inquiring into problem situations in order to introduce intervention for some purpose or other. In general each derives from a…

Abstract

The systems domain maintains methodologies for inquiring into problem situations in order to introduce intervention for some purpose or other. In general each derives from a distinct paradigm that some suggest represents a condition of fragmentation. We offer a way of seeing systems methodologies holistically and cybernetically from a relationship between paradigms and weltanschauungen.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Michael P. Mokwa

Marketing is innovative thinking and inventive doing for many organizations. Most noncommercial organizations and small businesses are exploring formal marketing concepts and…

1367

Abstract

Marketing is innovative thinking and inventive doing for many organizations. Most noncommercial organizations and small businesses are exploring formal marketing concepts and methods for the first time. Industrial and high technology companies are becoming more sensitive to their customers and competitors and, therefore, to marketing efforts. Environmental uncertainty and pressures have challenged conventional practices in traditionally marketing‐oriented industries such as retailing and packaged goods.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Steven Carnaby

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Eero Immonen

This paper aims to design an optimal shape for an annular S-duct, considering both energy losses and exit flow uniformity, starting from a given baseline design. Moreover, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to design an optimal shape for an annular S-duct, considering both energy losses and exit flow uniformity, starting from a given baseline design. Moreover, this paper seeks to identify the design factors that affect the optimal annular S-duct designs.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has carried out computational fluid dynamic (CFD)-based shape optimization relative to five distinct numerical objectives, to understand their interrelations in optimal designs. Starting from a given baseline S-duct design, they have applied control node-induced shape deformations and high-order polynomial response surfaces for modeling the functional relationships between the shape variables and the numerical objectives. A statistical correlation analysis is carried out across the optimal designs.

Findings

The author has shown by single-objective optimization that the two typical goals in S-duct design, energy loss minimization and exit flow uniformity, are mutually contradictory. He has presented a multi-objective solution for an optimal shape, reducing the total pressure loss by 15.6 per cent and the normalized absolute radial exit velocity by 34.2 per cent relative to a baseline design. For each of the five numerical objectives, the best optimization results are obtained by using high-order polynomial models.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology is applicable to axisymmetric two-dimensional geometry models.

Originality/value

This paper applies a recently introduced shape optimization methodology to annular S-ducts, and, it is, to the author’s knowledge, the first paper to point out that the two widely studied design objectives for annular S-ducts are contradictory. This paper also addresses the value of using high-order polynomial response surface models in CFD-based shape optimization.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

R. Dobbins and B.O. Pettman

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections on…

12756

Abstract

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections on creativity and dealing with change; importance of clear goal setting; developing winning business and marketing strategies; negotiating skills; leadership; financial skills; and time management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1947

R.S. MORTIMER

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from 1641 to

Abstract

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from 1641 to 1667. This has been followed by additional Bibliographical Society publications covering similarly the years up to 1775. From the short sketches given in this series, indicating changes of imprint and type of work undertaken, scholars working with English books issued before the closing years of the eighteenth century have had great assistance in dating the undated and in determining the colour and calibre of any work before it is consulted.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1901

The institution of food and cookery exhibitions and the dissemination of practical knowledge with respect to cookery by means of lectures and demonstrations are excellent things…

51

Abstract

The institution of food and cookery exhibitions and the dissemination of practical knowledge with respect to cookery by means of lectures and demonstrations are excellent things in their way. But while it is important that better and more scientific attention should be generally given to the preparation of food for the table, it must be admitted to be at least equally important to insure that the food before it comes into the hands of the expert cook shall be free from adulteration, and as far as possible from impurity,—that it should be, in fact, of the quality expected. Protection up to a certain point and in certain directions is afforded to the consumer by penal enactments, and hitherto the general public have been disposed to believe that those enactments are in their nature and in their application such as to guarantee a fairly general supply of articles of tolerable quality. The adulteration laws, however, while absolutely necessary for the purpose of holding many forms of fraud in check, and particularly for keeping them within certain bounds, cannot afford any guarantees of superior, or even of good, quality. Except in rare instances, even those who control the supply of articles of food to large public and private establishments fail to take steps to assure themselves that the nature and quality of the goods supplied to them are what they are represented to be. The sophisticator and adulterator are always with us. The temptations to undersell and to misrepresent seem to be so strong that firms and individuals from whom far better things might reasonably be expected fall away from the right path with deplorable facility, and seek to save themselves, should they by chance be brought to book, by forms of quibbling and wriggling which are in themselves sufficient to show the moral rottenness which can be brought about by an insatiable lust for gain. There is, unfortunately, cheating to be met with at every turn, and it behoves at least those who control the purchase and the cooking of food on the large scale to do what they can to insure the supply to them of articles which have not been tampered with, and which are in all respects of proper quality, both by insisting on being furnished with sufficiently authoritative guarantees by the vendors, and by themselves causing the application of reasonably frequent scientific checks upon the quality of the goods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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