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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2013

Christina S.E. Han, John L. Oliffe and John S. Ogrodniczuk

The purpose of this paper is to describe culture- and context-specific suicidal behaviours among Korean-Canadian immigrants as a means to guiding the development of targeted…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe culture- and context-specific suicidal behaviours among Korean-Canadian immigrants as a means to guiding the development of targeted culturally sensitive suicide prevention programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

Fifteen Korean-Canadian immigrants who had experiences with suicidal behaviours (e.g. suicidal ideation, suicide attempts) participated in this qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted for 30-90 minutes individually and constant comparison analysis methods were used to inductively derive recurrent prevailing themes from the interview data.

Findings

The study findings reveal that causes and triggers for suicidal behaviours among Korean-Canadians most often emerged from academic and work pressures, estranged family and altered identities. Permeating these themes were deeply embedded cultural values, which according to the participants, could afford protection or heighten the risk for suicide.

Research limitations/implications

By focussing only on first-generation Korean-Canadian immigrants, the results are limited in what they can reasonably say about other Canadian immigrant sub-groups.

Practical implications

In light of the current research findings, mental health care providers should be cognizant of immigrant patients’ cultural backgrounds and life circumstances as a means to further understanding what underpins their risk for suicide.

Originality/value

Notwithstanding the aforementioned limitation, this study contributes important empirical insights about Korean-Canadian immigrants’ suicidal ideation and risk/protective factors. This not only adds to the wider literature connecting culture and suicidality, it affirms the need for culture-specific research as a means to developing culturally sensitive mental health services.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2023

Abstract

Details

Digitisation, AI and Algorithms in African Journalism and Media Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-135-6

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Natasha Slutskaya, Alexander Simpson and Jason Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities of incorporating such visual methods as photoelicitation and photovoice into qualitative research, in order to retrieve…

1795

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities of incorporating such visual methods as photoelicitation and photovoice into qualitative research, in order to retrieve something that, as a result of particular group socialisation, has been hidden, unspoken of or marginalised.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design combines 40 in‐depth verbal interviews with male butchers, with the use of photoelicitation and photovoice, in order to increase participant control of data generation.

Findings

Results suggest that photoelicitation enabled working‐class men to engage with themes which are rarely reflected on or discussed; which may sit uneasily with desired presentations of self; and which challenge traditional notions of gendered work. It prompted participants to elaborate and translate their daily experiences of physical labour into more expressive and detailed accounts. This provided room for the display of positive emotions and self‐evaluation and the surfacing of the aesthetics and the pleasures of the trade – aspects that might have been otherwise concealed as a result of adherence to identity affirming norms. Photoelicitation also evoked powerful nostalgic themes about the past: a lament for the loss of skills; the passing of the time of closer communities and more traditional values.

Originality/value

The use of photovoice and photoelicitation in the exploration of a class and gendered “habitus” has highlighted the power of visual methods to offer a closer look at what participants considered important, to open space for the emergence of unexpected topics and themes and to allow for more comprehensive and reflective elaboration on specificities of personal experiences and emotions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2021

Lyndsay M.C. Hayhurst, Holly Thorpe and Megan Chawansky

Abstract

Details

Sport, Gender and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-863-0

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Claire Anne Hanlon, Jennifer Chopra, Jane Boland, David McIlroy, Helen Poole and Pooja Saini

High suicide rates among men presents a global challenge for commissioners and clinicians. Innovative approaches towards suicide prevention interventions designed for men are…

Abstract

Purpose

High suicide rates among men presents a global challenge for commissioners and clinicians. Innovative approaches towards suicide prevention interventions designed for men are needed. The James’ Place (JP) service opened in 2018, and its model of practice is a clinical, community-based intervention for men experiencing suicidal crisis. This paper aims to describe the implementation framework within which the JP model is applied.

Design/methodology/approach

Fostering a public health case study approach, this paper provides a description of how the JP service operates, including the referral pathways, key components of this innovative model and its impact upon the men who receive the intervention. Illustrative case studies derived from semi-structured interviews from men and therapists are reported.

Findings

The JP model is dynamic and flexible, allowing the tailoring of a suicidal crisis intervention to suit the needs and priorities of the individual and the wider local community. Clinical and practical implications, such as reduction in suicidality, are discussed.

Originality/value

Rapidly accessible, effective community-based interventions for men experiencing suicidal crisis are required. Yet, while widely advocated in policy, there remains a dearth of evidence illustrating the real-world application and value of such services within a community-setting. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the JP model is the first of its kind in the UK and an example of an innovative clinical, community-based suicide prevention intervention offering support for men experiencing suicidal crisis.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2021

John C. Pruit, Amanda G. Pruit and Carol Rambo

This autoethnography takes up the matter of toxic masculinity in university settings. We introduce the term “status silencing” as a way to make visible the normalization of toxic…

Abstract

This autoethnography takes up the matter of toxic masculinity in university settings. We introduce the term “status silencing” as a way to make visible the normalization of toxic masculinity in everyday talk and interaction in university settings among and around colleagues. Status silencing is the process in which the status of a dominant individual becomes a context which renders the story of an individual with a subordinated status untellable or untold. Using strange accounting, we explore active and passive types of status silencing to show how talk and interactions involving toxic masculinity are both internalized and externalized expressions of power and dominance. We argue that while most scholars view toxic masculinity as blatant acts of violence (mass shootings, rape and sexual assault, etc.), it is also a normalized occurrence for feminized others and that toxic masculinity in academic settings is part of an ongoing institutional norm of silence.

Details

Radical Interactionism and Critiques of Contemporary Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-029-8

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2022

Esmée Sinéad Hanna and Brendan Gough

Abstract

Details

(In)Fertile Male Bodies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-609-4

Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Janine Pierce

The purpose of this paper was to examine and reflect on the visual social research method of photovoice, which is a qualitative research process increasingly being used by…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to examine and reflect on the visual social research method of photovoice, which is a qualitative research process increasingly being used by government and nongovernment organizations to enable participants who are often from disadvantaged groups, to capture their lives, experiences, and issues through photos and associated written stories. Visual methods such as photovoice provide both opportunities and risks with ethical considerations and concerns that are both ethical in nature for those taking the photographs, and for those in the photographs. There are also associated ethical challenges for researchers to conform to ethical guidelines, while conveying stories that are in the public interest. Ascertaining why visual information should be considered in relation to ethics can be argued as important, as the receiver processing the visual information will process, perceive, and respond in a variety of ways, and possibly in different ways to what the sender aimed to convey. It was argued here that due to the strong ethical guidelines for photovoice projects, it is more of a deontological-based research approach. A key ethical concern associated with photovoice is that it is touted to participants as a vehicle to achieve social change, yet there is no guarantee that this change will occur, as ultimate power rests in the hands of decision makers. Photovoice ethical processes were discussed, with reflections by the author on ethical issues that have occurred in her own research, and suggestions to organizations on what to consider to ensure a photovoice project proceeds with ethical consideration to ensure an empowering experience as an influencer for social change.

Details

Visual Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-165-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Ines Testoni, Giulia Branciforti, Adriano Zamperini, Livia Zuliani and Felice Alfonso Nava

Gender inequality and sexism are often at the root of domestic violence against women and children, with both serving to justify male domination. This runs in parallel with…

Abstract

Purpose

Gender inequality and sexism are often at the root of domestic violence against women and children, with both serving to justify male domination. This runs in parallel with mother-blaming bias, which constitutes a pervasive common sense and scientific error derived from the myth of the good and the bad mother, characterising a large part of studies on deviance. The purpose of this paper is to consider the possible role of sexism in prisoners’ deviant biographies; for this, the authors considered the role of the mother in the biographies of prisoners, and the results lend support to the idea that mother-blaming is a serious fallacy. Starting from a critical psychology point of view and following the retrospective methodology, the authors interviewed 22 drug-addicted prisoners through Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) regarding their biographies and their relationships with parents and partners.

Design/methodology/approach

In the survey, the authors followed the same intention, and the results lend support to the idea that mother-blaming is a serious fallacy. The authors interviewed 22 drug-addicted prisoners through IPA concerning their biographies and their relationships with parents and partners.

Findings

The main result of this qualitative study was the recognition of a fundamental sexism assumed by participants, characterised by a paradox between the representation of the mother and the representation of the ideal woman. Despite the mother being their positive affective referent, and battered by her husband/partner, the same participants had been witnesses of domestic violence, and sometimes victims, they interiorised from their father an ambivalent sexism: benevolent sexism with regard to their mother and exhibited hostile sexism with their partner. On the one hand, it emerged that female empowerment was desirable with respect to the mothers. On the other hand, the ideal woman was exactly as their mother was, that is, being absolutely subordinated to men (a patient, caring, submissive housewife, totally dedicated to her children and her husband).

Research limitations/implications

From a mainstream psychological perspective, the limits of the research are linked to the utilisation of the narrative method. Also, this methodology does not verify any hypotheses, so quotations from the participants are used to illustrate themes, and thus, it is difficult to report the informational complexities arising from the dialogues. However, the literature has emphasised that these limitations do not invalidate qualitative research findings, despite the difficulties in generalising the results of the qualitative studies. Thereafter, the critical analysis moved within the intersection of experience-centred approaches and the culturally oriented treatment of narratives, so that the focus on the stories of the prisoners makes meaning because it applies structure to experience, albeit, with the form and content of the texts. This research did not permit us to measure and evaluate post-hoc any post-traumatic hypotheses, which, in turn, would give room for further research. Another limitation of the research was that the relationship between culture of origin and gender biases, especially with participants from non-European countries, was not analysed. This topic would require an important in-depth study, which encompasses how women are treated in different countries and its effects on social maladjustment for immigrants in Italy.

Practical implications

The outcome of this study suggests that within similar structures in the Institute of Mitigated Custody, the theme of sexism should be considered in more depth. Since sexism justifies violence against women, and is therefore a factor that can cause recidivism in the antisocial behaviour of prisoners once they have served their sentences. It is important to allow them to analyse the relationship between their sexist attitudes, witnessing violence in childhood and the possibility of changing moral values of reference in favour of equality. This type of psychological intervention must necessarily be based not only on the elaboration of traumas suffered during childhood with an abusive father, but also on issues related to gender equality and the theme of social inclusion.

Social implications

The study suggests the idea that male sexism can be a factor responsible for suffering and maladjustment for men and that therefore an education that promotes equality of gender differences can also help prevent the social distress associated with drug addiction and deviance.

Originality/value

The paper considers some cogent issues inherent to ambivalent sexism that pervades prisoners’ aspirations for their future.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Tabitha Ramsey White, Anne‐Marie Hede and Ruth Rentschler

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether art experiences can inform service‐dominant logic (SDL) discourse through an exploration of the co‐production and co‐creation…

2080

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether art experiences can inform service‐dominant logic (SDL) discourse through an exploration of the co‐production and co‐creation processes of art experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical knowledge gained about art experiences is analysed to identify emergent themes about co‐production and co‐creation. Four modes of qualitative data collection are employed: research participant diaries, photo elicitation, in depth interviews and focus groups.

Findings

Key findings are there are three stakeholders involved in the co‐creation of art experiences, which all have critical and different roles; co‐creation and co‐production are both temporally based and evolving and there are points where they interact and intersect; and high levels of engagement in co‐production enhance individuals' contribution to the co‐creation of positive value and make their participation in future co‐production opportunities more likely.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is exploratory and not a general population study. The methodology and sample of participants employed do not allow for the generalisation of the findings to the broader population.

Practical implications

Organisations may benefit from devising strategies to encourage greater dialogue and connection between all stakeholders involved in co‐production and co‐creation. The higher the level of individuals' co‐production of art experiences the greater likelihood of positive value being co‐created. Furthermore, the greater the possibility of individuals engaging in other co‐production experiences in the future. While individuals are attracted to co‐production possibilities, there are factors that are external to an experience that can act as either barriers to or facilitators of co‐production, and that consequently impact on co‐creation.

Originality/value

There is little extant research that explores the applicability of art experiences to SDL. This paper is significant in that it employs empirical research methods to develop knowledge on the topic. Furthermore, this paper is innovative in that it seeks to see whether the art experiences can inform generic marketing models, rather than whether generic marketing models can inform arts marketing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 10 of 14