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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Janine Pierce

The purpose of this paper was to examine and reflect on the visual social research method of photovoice, which is a qualitative research process increasingly being used by…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to examine and reflect on the visual social research method of photovoice, which is a qualitative research process increasingly being used by government and nongovernment organizations to enable participants who are often from disadvantaged groups, to capture their lives, experiences, and issues through photos and associated written stories. Visual methods such as photovoice provide both opportunities and risks with ethical considerations and concerns that are both ethical in nature for those taking the photographs, and for those in the photographs. There are also associated ethical challenges for researchers to conform to ethical guidelines, while conveying stories that are in the public interest. Ascertaining why visual information should be considered in relation to ethics can be argued as important, as the receiver processing the visual information will process, perceive, and respond in a variety of ways, and possibly in different ways to what the sender aimed to convey. It was argued here that due to the strong ethical guidelines for photovoice projects, it is more of a deontological-based research approach. A key ethical concern associated with photovoice is that it is touted to participants as a vehicle to achieve social change, yet there is no guarantee that this change will occur, as ultimate power rests in the hands of decision makers. Photovoice ethical processes were discussed, with reflections by the author on ethical issues that have occurred in her own research, and suggestions to organizations on what to consider to ensure a photovoice project proceeds with ethical consideration to ensure an empowering experience as an influencer for social change.

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Visual Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-165-6

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Gulshan Tajuria, Sue Read and Helena M. Priest

People with intellectual disabilities experiencing loss or bereavement are at risk of developing additional mental health problems, and may struggle to access suitable…

Abstract

Purpose

People with intellectual disabilities experiencing loss or bereavement are at risk of developing additional mental health problems, and may struggle to access suitable support. The purpose of this paper is to present the adaptations done while using Photovoice as a creative method for bereaved people with intellectual disabilities participating in a research exploring loss and support. This paper will further briefly add information on how the use of Photovoice supported the development of whole research project.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the use of Photovoice as a method of research engagement for bereaved adults with intellectual disabilities. Photovoice enables participants to take and discuss photographs illustrating their loss and support experiences. The paper focusses on a preparatory Photovoice workshop with the research participants, outlining the processes and activities used to maximise involvement, promote learning and achieve shared understanding.

Findings

Preparation was the key to the effectiveness of this workshop and it recommends that appropriate adaptions are useful in Photovoice with adults with intellectual disabilities effectively. The paper outlines principles of good practice for using Photovoice in this research context, which may transfer to other similar research settings. Using Photovoice facilitated later one-to-one interviews with the participants, where their photographs were discussed together.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the innovative use of Photovoice methodology in research involving bereaved people with intellectual disabilities. Photovoice has not previously been used with this specific population within the bereavement and loss context, so this paper adds to the developing evidence base.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 11 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Jennifer Barry, Christine Monahan, Sharon Ferguson, Kelley Lee, Ruth Kelly, Mark Monahan, Rebecca Murphy, Patrick Gibbons and Agnes Higgins

The purpose of this paper is to provide first-hand reflective narratives from participants of their involvement in the overall process, with particular reference to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide first-hand reflective narratives from participants of their involvement in the overall process, with particular reference to the benefits and challenges of engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Five participants agreed to write a reflective piece of approximately 500 words on their involvement in the PhotoVoice project.

Findings

The reflective narratives in this paper demonstrate the personal and professional benefits of sustained and meaningful engagement, while challenges such as power imbalances, identity management, time and cost commitments are discussed.

Practical implications

PhotoVoice is a methodology that has the potential to democratise knowledge production and dissemination.

Originality/value

There are scant examples in the PhotoVoice literature of the inclusion of participants involvement in dissemination activities. The reflective narratives in this paper demonstrate the personal and professional benefits of sustained and meaningful engagement, while challenges such as power imbalances, identity management, time and cost commitments are discussed.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Sarah Turnbull

Purpose – This chapter critically reflects on the author’s failed attempt to incorporate visual methods in follow-up research on immigration detention and deportation in…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter critically reflects on the author’s failed attempt to incorporate visual methods in follow-up research on immigration detention and deportation in Britain. In particular, it considers the uses and limits of participant-generated visuals, and the specific method of photovoice, which were originally conceived as a means to explore themes of home, identity, and belonging in and through practices of detention and release or expulsion.

Methodology/approach – This chapter discusses the visual method of photovoice to consider the uses and limits of participant-generated visuals.

Findings – Drawing on the notion of research “failure,” this chapter highlights the challenges and limitations of photovoice in follow-up research with individuals who were detained and/or deported, pointing to various methodological, logistical, ethical, and political issues pertaining to the method itself and the use of the visual in criminological research.

Originality/value – Criminologists are increasingly considering the visual and the power of photographic images within criminological research, both as objects of study and through the use of visual methodologies. This shift toward the examination, as well as integration, of images raises a number of important methodological, ethical, and political questions worthy of consideration, including instances where visual methods like photovoice are unsuccessful in a research project.

Details

Methods of Criminology and Criminal Justice Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-865-9

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Tonderai Washington Shumba, Desderius Haufiku and Kabwebwe Honoré Mitonga

For the past four decades, there is no evidence of a consensus on the suitable community-based rehabilitation (CBR) evaluation methodologies. To this end, the purpose of…

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Abstract

Purpose

For the past four decades, there is no evidence of a consensus on the suitable community-based rehabilitation (CBR) evaluation methodologies. To this end, the purpose of this study is to provide a narrative review on CBR evaluations and the potential of photovoice method when used alone and when used in combination with quality of life assessment tools as CBR evaluation methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review was undertaken, but including some aspects of scoping review methodology.

Findings

Thirty-three full-text articles were included for review. Three key findings were an overview of the evolution of CBR evaluation; the use of photovoice method in CBR evaluation and the use of photovoice method in combination with quality of life assessment tools in CBR evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

Photovoice methodology was found to be participatory in nature and as has the potential to elicit the experiences of persons with disabilities. However, photovoice falls short of measuring the quality of life of persons with disabilities, thus will need to be collaborated with another assessment tool. A combination of photovoice and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and WHOQOL-Dis assessment has a potential to give an adequate representation of the voices of persons with disabilities and their quality of life.

Originality/value

There is need for changes in CBR evaluation methodologies in response to the evolution of disability models from medical model to human rights model. Thus CBR evaluation methodologies should embrace the diversity among persons with disabilities in interpreting life experiences and quality of life.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Tonderai Washington Shumba, Desderius Haufiku and Hans Amukugo

Qualitative participatory methods are needed to measure the effectiveness of the community-based rehabilitation (CBR) program in Namibia. The study explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

Qualitative participatory methods are needed to measure the effectiveness of the community-based rehabilitation (CBR) program in Namibia. The study explored the experiences of CBR volunteers in evaluating CBR program in Namibia through the use of photovoice. Further the study assessed the strengths and limitations of utilizing photovoice method as an assessment tool for CBR evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design. Data was collected through the photovoice method. Two CBR sites and 16 participants who were CBR volunteers were purposively selected. Data was collected and analysis was conducted simultaneously utilizing the photovoice method and themes were determined using WHO CBR matrix.

Findings

Various experiences were elicited regarding participants' experiences in line with the five components of the CBR matrix. Most experiences were reported regarding the health component, and the education component had the least experiences reported. Methodological strength and weaknesses as well as implications for practice are revealed. Further research can explore the benefits of combining photovoice with other data collection methods.

Originality/value

Sustainability of CBR programs depends on community ownership, empowerment and government funding. Photovoice is participatory and hence gives community ownership and empowerment. Evidence from photovoice can enable persons with disabilities to formulate action plans that can advocate their concerns with policymakers and justify more funding for CBR programs.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Lili Luo

The purpose of this paper is to generate awareness of and interest in the photovoice method, and help librarians to be more creative in examining user needs, perceptions…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to generate awareness of and interest in the photovoice method, and help librarians to be more creative in examining user needs, perceptions and behavior and be more effective in conducting outreach to user communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Photovice is a qualitative method that combines visuals and narratives in exploring community issues. This paper reviews the photovoice method and discusses its implications in engaging library user communities.

Findings

Photovoice is rarely used in library research and practice and only three published studies reported the use of this method. The three studies were reviewed in this paper to offer ideas regarding the potential application of this method in the library profession.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of an innovative method and contributes new ideas to library outreach and user engagement.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Carmen Coronado, Carla Freijomil-Vázquez, Sara Fernández-Basanta, Elena Andina-Díaz and María-Jesús Movilla-Fernández

Higher education institutions have a significant impact in preparing future generations for the creation of a sustainable society. By formulating appropriate curricula…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions have a significant impact in preparing future generations for the creation of a sustainable society. By formulating appropriate curricula, the university can shape student personality with sustainability concerns. This study aims to present the results of a teaching approach on environmental sustainability using the photovoice methodology. A guided visit to the sewage treatment plant of A Coruña was included as a teaching activity in the “Microbiology and Parasitology” classes of the podiatry degree at University of A Coruña. The teaching objectives were to reinforce contents through observation and to introduce citizen awareness on sustainability and responsible water use in a cross-sectional manner.

Design/methodology/approach

In this case study, different steps of photovoice as a qualitative participatory action methodology were developed. A total of 43 university students willingly participated with their photographs. Qualitative data were collected from the students’ photovoice visit reports and a subsequent discussion group. Thematic content analysis was performed manually.

Findings

This study explored the impact of an environmental sustainability teaching activity on the university student community. Six main categories emerged from the qualitative analysis: savings/waste of water, misuse of the water closet, disposing of used oil, solid waste/trash, reuse of clean water and reuse/reduction of the use of plastics. The cross-sectional findings on the needs of education and awareness of sustainability in the community and companies are presented.

Originality/value

The findings provide evidence of the ability of photovoice method as a pedagogical tool to promote reflection and change in the university community and to introduce sustainability cross-sectional content in green campus curricula. This photovoice experiment is simple and feasible to implement and has a very low economic cost, as long as there are qualified educators.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Sarah Tickle

The purpose of this paper is to examine and reflect upon the value of using a camera with young people in the research process. In particular, the paper discusses the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and reflect upon the value of using a camera with young people in the research process. In particular, the paper discusses the opportunities that a camera can bring when researching young people’s lives, subsequently encouraging the use of photovoice with young people in ethnographic research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines how photovoice can be a beneficial method of data collection when researching young people’s lives. By adopting a qualitative participatory approach, and employing photovoice as one of the main methods, rich and meaningful data were gathered that traditional qualitative methods alone would not have captured.

Findings

Photovoice was used alongside traditional methods to explore how young people experienced and perceived policing, safety and security in a coastal resort. Using a camera, captured rich images which alongside the narratives given by the young people, provided profound and detailed accounts.

Originality/value

Using innovative participatory qualitative research methods with young people and adapting to the research setting allowed for deep and meaningful explorations of young people’s lives to be gathered. Carefully considering the use of appropriate methods of data collection and selecting methods that are “fun” and “interesting” empowered young people and provided the researcher with an insight into their social worlds.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Richard Woolrych

The author has used photography to engage tenants in examining services and their lives, communities, hopes and dreams. PhotoVoice is a way of promoting active…

Abstract

The author has used photography to engage tenants in examining services and their lives, communities, hopes and dreams. PhotoVoice is a way of promoting active participation and dialogue, and is particularly attractive to people who have difficulty with verbal or written communication. PhotoVoice enables others to see the world as perceived and experienced by service users and is an effective way of empowering tenants and involving them in research and change strategies.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

1 – 10 of 196