Search results

1 – 4 of 4
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Ishmael Owiredu, Damian Laryea and John Barimah

– The aim of this paper is to promote the utilization and diversification of cashew nuts through its use as a substitute for wheat flour in biscuit production.

409

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to promote the utilization and diversification of cashew nuts through its use as a substitute for wheat flour in biscuit production.

Design/methodology/approach

Wheat flour was substituted with cashew nut flour (CNF) at levels of 0, 20, 30 and 40 percent in the production of biscuit. The products obtained were subjected to proximate, mineral and sensory analysis.

Findings

There was a significant increase in protein and fat contents from 7.75 and 22.11 percent to 12.89 and 32.11 percent, respectively, when CNF increased, whiles carbohydrate decreased from 66.67 to 48.04 percent. A significant increase in magnesium (27.93-97.03 mg/100 g), sodium (198.11-228.02 mg/100 g), phosphorus (55.90-149.00 mg/100 g), potassium (290.40-990.00 mg/100 g), zinc (0.72-2.00 mg/100 g) and iron (0.28-1.00 mg/100 g) was also observed as CNF increased. Sensory analysis revealed that there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the 20 and 30 percent substituted samples, in terms of overall acceptability. Therefore, wheat flour could be substituted with CNF up to 30 percent in the production of biscuit.

Originality/value

This study was done to ascertain the potential use of CNF as a substitute for wheat flour and a nutrient enrichment in biscuit production, in order to diversify its use; since it still remains an underutilized raw material in Ghana.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

John Barimah, Damian Laryea and Ugett Naa Korkoi Okine

– This paper aims to assess the potential of date fruit powder as a refined sugar replacer in rock buns to help promote and diversify the utilization of date fruit.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the potential of date fruit powder as a refined sugar replacer in rock buns to help promote and diversify the utilization of date fruit.

Design/methodology/approach

Date fruit pulp was sun dried, milled into powder, sieved and its proximate composition determined. Refined sugar in rock buns was replaced with date fruit powder at 0, 50, 80 and 100 per cent levels. The samples were then subjected to proximate, mineral and sensory evaluation.

Findings

Date fruit powder had 1.47 per cent crude fiber and was high in carbohydrate (82.15 per cent). Carbohydrate content of samples decreased (48.55-29.72 per cent), while crude protein (6.78-9.97 per cent), crude fat (22.74-33.66 per cent) and crude fiber (0-0.49 per cent) contents increased with an increasing substitution of date powder. Of all, 0 and 50 per cent substituted rock bun samples were the most preferred. Date powder significantly (p < 0.05) increased the potassium (0.55-1.57 per cent), calcium (0.08-1.08 per cent) and iron (0.53-0.625 per cent) contents of the samples.

Originality/value

This research assessed the potential of date fruit powder as a replacer of refined sugar in rock buns, as it remains an underutilized commodity in Ghana. Replacing 50 per cent of refined sugar improved the nutrient composition of rock buns, thereby making date fruit powder a nutritious sugar replacer which could be used in pastry products. This when adopted would diversify the utilization of date fruits while providing good nutrition to consumers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Moneera Othman Aljobair

The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory properties and chemical composition of corn and sorghum flakes manufactured using 25, 50, 75 and 100 per cent date syrup…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory properties and chemical composition of corn and sorghum flakes manufactured using 25, 50, 75 and 100 per cent date syrup (DS), instead of sugar.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten individuals assessed the overall acceptability, taste, texture and aroma of flakes. The chemical composition of each type of flake was determined, and these characteristics compared with those of control corn and sorghum flakes (without DS).

Findings

The overall acceptability of sorghum flakes ranged from 6.3 (100 per cent DS flakes) to 6.8 (25 per cent DS flakes); however, the difference was not significant. Values for taste, texture and aroma of sorghum flakes ranged from 5.3 (taste of 100 per cent DS flakes) to 7.2 (texture of 25 per cent DS flakes). For corn flakes, values ranged from 6.20 (aroma of 100 per cent DS flakes) to 7.20 (texture of 25 per cent DS flakes). For both sorghum and corn, the colors of 25-100 per cent DS flakes were significantly different from controls (p = 0.0002). The total carbohydrate, fat, protein and ash contents were 81.669 per cent, 1.545 per cent, 13.27 per cent and 3.52 per cent for corn flour, and 83.38-85.78 per cent, 1.7-2.0 per cent, 10.02-12.13 per cent and 2.36-3.92 per cent for sorghum flour, respectively. The total carbohydrate, fat, protein and ash contents were 81.63 per cent, 5.75 per cent, 9.80 per cent and 2.82 per cent for corn, and 86.31-84.99 per cent, 3.15-4.27 per cent, 7.64-7.94 per cent and 2.92-2.79 per cent for sorghum flakes, respectively.

Originality/value

Corn and sorghum flakes produced with DS are acceptable to consumers, and their nutrient values indicate potential health benefits.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Alexander Preko, Iddrisu Mohammed and Azizbek Allaberganov

This study aims to examine the antecedents of halal brand equity on destination brand equity (DBE) within the tourism sector. Although much has been done on halal tourism, the…

1014

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the antecedents of halal brand equity on destination brand equity (DBE) within the tourism sector. Although much has been done on halal tourism, the issue of halal and brand equity has received little attention in a non-Islamic state context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the brand equity theory, 312 Muslim tourists were conveniently drawn from the Larabanga tourism site with the use of structural equation modelling technique to analyse the data.

Findings

The study revealed that halal brand awareness and halal value have positive and significant impact on DBE. Also, halal perceived brand quality and halal image had a negative but significant impact on DBE.

Research limitations/implications

This research is on a country-specific halal brand equity tourism destination, which means that the findings cannot be generalized to other geographical areas.

Practical implications

The study provides an insight into halal tourism and destination equity, which is important for marketers, the ministry of tourism and local tourism officials to support halal tourism in a non-Islamic country.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap by presenting the first comprehensive overview of halal brand equity research that enhances ongoing discussions in the hospitality and tourism field in a non-Islamic context and proposes priorities for future research.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

1 – 4 of 4