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1 – 10 of 17
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Joanna Fountain and Michael Mackay

Recent theorising about the globalising countryside highlights the processes of place making, sense of place and the construction of place-based identities in rural regions, where…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent theorising about the globalising countryside highlights the processes of place making, sense of place and the construction of place-based identities in rural regions, where exogenous forces are utilised, negotiated and contested by local communities as they seek to represent their place. A longitudinal case study of Akaroa’s French Festival shows how this place-based identity has been constructed, promoted and animated over the past two decades at the nexus of globalising and local forces. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on qualitative methods utilising documentary analysis, participant observation and key stakeholder interviews undertaken in the township of Akaroa, New Zealand.

Findings

The form this festival has taken, and the version of the place identity represented therein, has shifted over the course of the last two decades. While this is in part due to the energy, personal heritage and agenda of local champions, the influence of the globalising forces, political, economic and cultural, have shaped the place image portrayed through this festival.

Originality/value

There are limited attempts to theorise rural festivals within a “global countryside” framework, and the detailed longitudinal research underpinning this paper provides a unique opportunity to explore the emergent issues in a rural community festival in qualitative detail. The study reinforces the understanding of the role of local agency in the making of places in a globalising world.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2022

Rory Hill and Joanna Fountain

This paper aims to situate restaurant experiences and in particular the wines available on wine lists, within the wider context of wine tourism. This is done by examining the wine…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to situate restaurant experiences and in particular the wines available on wine lists, within the wider context of wine tourism. This is done by examining the wine lists of restaurants in two New Zealand destinations, focusing in particular on the showcasing of “local wines” and the factors behind these offerings, and outlines the potential implications for hospitality managers and a wider academic audience.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of restaurants in each destination was identified using online directories, from which a sample of wine lists, comprising 84 in Christchurch and 43 in Queenstown, was systematically analysed to identify number of wines, regional origin, price and other information. Following this, key informant interviews in restaurants in each destination explored decision-making factors in stocking local wines, including consumer base, existing networks and reputation and additional challenges and opportunities.

Findings

Restaurants in each destination offered more New Zealand than foreign wines on their lists, though significant regional differences are apparent. Queenstown restaurants offered slightly fewer imported wines and significantly more local (Central Otago) wines than Christchurch restaurants. The global awareness of Central Otago pinot noir is a factor in this wine list representation, but there are also other influences, including the greater concentration of overseas visitors (pre-pandemic) and more significant visibility and greater opportunities for wine tourism experiences within the destination.

Originality/value

This paper represents an important addition to academic research on wine marketing in the on-premise sector of emerging wine regions. This paper also highlights the potential significance of restaurant meals – including wine choices – in overall wine destination experiences and demonstrates differences in approach between restaurants in wine regions of similar size but with different reputations, international visitation and wine tourism infrastructure.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 February 2024

Murray Mackenzie, Karin Weber, Joanna Fountain and Reza Abbasi

This study aims to provide insights into wine consumers in Hong Kong and Mainland China, and the diversity of their behavior, by investigating their motivations, consumption and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights into wine consumers in Hong Kong and Mainland China, and the diversity of their behavior, by investigating their motivations, consumption and purchasing behavior and segmenting the sample based on wine knowledge and frequency of consumption to identify three distinct clusters that are then profiled.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected through an online survey of wine consumers of ethnic Chinese origin residing in Mainland China and Hong Kong, using two methods of recruitment (a convenience sample from wine-related databases, a panel survey undertaken by an international market research firm). The final sample comprised 477 respondents, about equally divided among Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong wine consumers. Analysis of the data using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences for Windows (SPSS) 29 included a series of descriptive analyses, followed by a two-step cluster analysis using an Euclidean distance method.

Findings

Wine knowledge and frequency of wine consumption were relatively higher within the sample as a whole than previous studies, but three distinct consumer segments are evident. There is evidence of a democratization of wine consumption, and a greater focus on wine consumption for enjoyment in relaxed and informal settings. rather than consumption driven by health and status, occurring primarily in commercial or business settings. The dominance of red wine in this market is also declining, and intrinsic cues – specifically, prior experience of the wine – are becoming important in wine purchase decisions.

Originality/value

This study uses a broad sample of wine consumers to identify trends in wine consumption patterns and motivations, and purchase decision-making behavior, of Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong wine consumers. The identification of three clusters of wine consumers offers both points of comparison with previous segmentation research globally and within China, whilst also identifying scope for further research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Joanna Fountain

This paper considers two sectors critical to New Zealand's economy and identity – food and tourism – and addresses the question: what role will – or could – food and drink play in…

11711

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers two sectors critical to New Zealand's economy and identity – food and tourism – and addresses the question: what role will – or could – food and drink play in a more resilient tourism future for the country?

Design/methodology/approach

This is largely a conceptual paper, informed by the academic literature, media commentary and recent market research.

Findings

The paper concludes that there are trends apparent in the food and tourism sectors prior to the COVID-19 pandemic that have intensified during lockdown and which are likely to influence the resetting of tourism on a more resilient and regenerative pathway. Three potential trends in food and drink tourism are identified, labelled “Getting back to basics”, “Valuing local and locals” and “Food for well-being”.

Originality/value

By synthesising recent research and academic, industry and media commentaries, this paper provides a timely assessment of a potential future role of food and drink tourism in a reimagined tourism sector for New Zealand, with this assessment offering a starting point for further discussions about a more regenerative, equitable and inclusive tourism future.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Hannah L. Wolf, Sussie C. Morrish and Joanna Fountain

Consumer perceptions and motivation for luxury consumption are extensively investigated in the existing literature, although studies have largely focused on branded products with…

1961

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer perceptions and motivation for luxury consumption are extensively investigated in the existing literature, although studies have largely focused on branded products with not much attention given to luxury wine. The wine category is distinctive, and luxury wine consumption is notably different from other luxury products. Over the past 20 years, the luxury segment of the wine industry has experienced steady growth, yet understanding of consumer perceptions and motivation for luxury wine consumption is still underdeveloped. Using self-congruency theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework of the perceptions of, and motivation for, luxury wine consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a scoping review approach, the current literature on luxury wine and luxury branded products is analyzed for existing gaps in understanding luxury wine consumption.

Findings

The conceptualization of luxury wine along with the perceptions, motivators and indicators for wine consumption are currently underdeveloped. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding what drives perceptions and motivators of luxury wine consumption.

Originality/value

Emerging from a scoping review of extant literature, this paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding consumers’ perceptions of luxury wine and motivations for consumption. This framework will enable a better understanding of the dynamics of luxury wine consumption.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Joanna Fountain and Charles Lamb

The primary aim of this research is to identify the wine consumption behaviour of Generation Y in New Zealand to explore whether differences exist in the wine behaviour of Gen Y…

4457

Abstract

Purpose

The primary aim of this research is to identify the wine consumption behaviour of Generation Y in New Zealand to explore whether differences exist in the wine behaviour of Gen Y in comparison to Generation X and to seek possible explanations for these differences, in terms of cohort, age and period.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey was conducted with a random sample of residents of Christchurch, New Zealand in 1998 and again in 2008. Three forms of analysis were undertaken: time lag (comparing Gen Y, aged 18‐29 in 2008 with Gen X, aged 20‐29 in 1998), cross‐sectional (comparing Gen Y in 2008 with Gen X, aged 30‐39 in 2008) and longitudinal (comparing Gen X in 1998 and 2008).

Findings

In relation of wine consumption, there is no difference in the proportion of Gen X and Gen Y in New Zealand consuming wine as young adults, which is remarkably similar to the proportion of wine drinkers in the population as a whole. In terms of the evidence reported elsewhere that Generation Y are consuming more wine, and at a younger age, than their Gen X counterparts, this research supports this contention; New Zealand Gen Y are drinking wine more frequently, and in more everyday contexts than their older counterparts were at a similar age, although they are less likely to consume wine on special occasions.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on a relatively small sample within a specific urban New Zealand setting and further application to the country as a whole may be useful. Qualitative research, perhaps using a recall methodology to explore previous consumption behaviour, would help to provide more explanation for the findings.

Originality/value

This is the first research project to explore the wine behaviour of Gen Y in a New Zealand context. This research has used a random and representative sample and has been able to analyse cross‐sectional, longitudinal and time‐lag data for Gen Y and Gen X; an approach that has not previously been used in generational research on wine consumption behaviour and which provides insights not available using one method alone.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Simone Mueller and Steve Charters

1492

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Natalia Velikova, Steve Charters, Joanna Fountain, Caroline Ritchie, Nicola Fish and Tim Dodd

The purpose of this paper is to test Luna and Gupta’s (2001) investigative framework on the interaction of cultural values and consumer behaviour by conducting a cross-cultural…

1273

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test Luna and Gupta’s (2001) investigative framework on the interaction of cultural values and consumer behaviour by conducting a cross-cultural comparison of young wine consumers’ interpretation of images of champagne and sparkling wine. The research examined consumer responses to the images through the prism of the relationship between symbolism, ritual and myth, as well as other related values.

Design/methodology/approach

In a series of focus groups with consumers from four anglophone countries (the USA, New Zealand, Australia and the UK), six images of champagne and sparkling wine were used as stimuli to encourage affective and cognitive perspectives on the topic.

Findings

Overall, the UK market showed distinct differences from the other markets, due very much to its cultural context. The UK consumers valued traditional advertising; focused mainly on the product itself; and did not associate champagne with fun. Respondents from the New World focused on the general impression of the image and on enjoyment and fun associated with consumption of champagne and sparkling wine.

Practical implications

The most crucial implication of this research is the cultural variation in consumer perceptions of champagne and sparkling wine and the impact that it has upon marketing strategies on how to market this product category to younger consumers in different markets.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the study of cultural values and consumption behaviour, as well as image effectiveness in forming perceptions of the product category.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Joanna Fountain, Nicola Fish and Steve Charters

There is growing research on the value of winery tasting rooms/cellar doors as an avenue for relationship building with consumers resulting in greater brand loyalty. This paper…

3437

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing research on the value of winery tasting rooms/cellar doors as an avenue for relationship building with consumers resulting in greater brand loyalty. This paper aims to examine the role of tasting rooms in this regard in an Australasian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was exploratory, designed to explore a full range of visitors' experiences at the winery tasting room, using a modified form of mystery shopping combined with focus groups.

Findings

Establishing brand loyalty through a winery tasting room experience requires more than just good wine or good service quality, rather it results from an experience which is personalised and which establishes an emotional connection between the visitor and the winery, their product and winery staff. Generally smaller wineries were making this emotional connection more effectively than larger wineries. By contrast, staff at small and larger wineries alike were making little effort to establish concrete links to instil brand loyalty with the wine tourist post‐visit by encouraging repeat visitation or promoting their mailing lists or even eliciting wine sales.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on a relatively small number of consumers in Australia and New Zealand and thus may not be immediately generalisable to other markets.

Practical implications

The research highlights numerous areas for improvement in the organisation of tasting room encounters and the training of staff, noticeably with regards to making lasting connections with visitors resulting in future brand loyalty; issues which could be addressed by winery managers.

Originality/value

The paper gives depth to results previously reported by researchers on the role of service provision at the tasting room to the overall winery experience, and adds perspectives on the effectiveness of efforts to establish brand loyalty and maintain post‐visit contact with the winery visitor.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Steve Charters, Natalia Velikova, Caroline Ritchie, Joanna Fountain, Liz Thach, Tim H. Dodd, Nicola Fish, Frikkie Herbst and Nic Terblanche

The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the engagement of Generation Y consumers with champagne and sparkling wine across five Anglophone countries.

3438

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the engagement of Generation Y consumers with champagne and sparkling wine across five Anglophone countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted using focus groups with young consumers, including images and wine tasting as projective stimuli.

Findings

There were significant trans‐cultural similarities between consumption behaviour (sparkling wine is a women's drink, and a separate category from still wine, and that they will “grow into” drinking it) but also noticeable differences (responses to images and colours varied substantially, as did attitudes to price and the particular status of champagne).

Research limitations/implications

Research into the behaviour of Generation Y as a cohort needs to take account of cultural as much as generational context. However, as a qualitative study the findings need further quantitative validation.

Practical implications

Marketers cannot view Generation Y as a single group; even within countries marketing strategies may need to be refined depending on where a product is being sold.

Originality/value

No trans‐cultural study on Generation Y has been carried out to date, nor has their engagement with sparkling wine been specifically explored.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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