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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Yulist Rima Fiandari, Surachman Surachman, Fatchur Rohman and Ananda Sabil Hussein

This study aims to establish the findings by confirming the extent to which an extended version of the TPB estimation relates to repetitive fish consumption. This study is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish the findings by confirming the extent to which an extended version of the TPB estimation relates to repetitive fish consumption. This study is important for the sustainable consumption of fish in society. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship that explains perceived value, consisting of monetary and non-monetary values, in shaping attitudes on repetition of fish consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The sampling of this study was conducted for eight months of 365 people who consumed fish for at least one year. This research was conducted in Malang City, Indonesia. Data analysis applied structural equation modelling by measuring perceived values, attitudes, social norms, behaviour control, intentions and frequency of fish consumption.

Findings

It mostly follows the extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) sections, with exception on the relationship of subjective norms to intentions and attitudes, subjective norms and perceived value towards repetition of fish consumption. The results of the study indicate that attitudes are preceded by the formation of perceived values. The perceived value significantly affects attitude formation. The perceived value of fish consumption is explained by health and monetary values. A positive attitude does not always precede consumption. Subjective norms provide a weak role in the repetition of fish consumption, while behaviour control plays an important role in realising action on repetitive fish consumption.

Originality/value

This study helps explain the extended TPB, and intentions towards the behaviour of repetitive fish consumption. Attitudes are preceded by the formation of perceived values in the TPB in intention repetitive fish consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Samantha L. Moore-Berg, Jessie C. Briggs and Andrew Karpinski

There has been contradictory evidence as to whether implicit attitudes are more indicative of food consumption behavior than explicit attitudes. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been contradictory evidence as to whether implicit attitudes are more indicative of food consumption behavior than explicit attitudes. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the predictive validity of implicit attitudes for food consumption behaviors with two popular indirect measures – the implicit association test (IAT) and the affective misattribution procedure (AMP).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined the predictive validity of the IAT and AMP for focal and incidental food consumption behaviors (n=277).

Findings

Results revealed that the IAT and the AMP were more context-dependent than initially expected. The IAT only predicted incidental consumption behaviors in Study 1, and the AMP only predicted incidental consumption behaviors when preceding the IAT. However, the indirect measures provided unique variance for predicting incidental consumption behaviors. Only a direct, self-report measure predicted focal behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest that both the AMP and the IAT can predict incidental consumption behaviors, but the presence and strength of these effects may be moderated by unsuspected variables such as task order.

Practical implications

The current study provides evidence for the benefits of utilizing implicit measures in addition to self-report measures during consumer and market research.

Originality/value

This research reevaluates the predictive validity of the IAT and AMP for food consumption behaviors and employs two measures of food consumption behaviors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2013

Tonya Williams Bradford

Individuals use money, time, and effort to consume, yet implicit in most consumer research is the availability of these resources, particularly money. While the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals use money, time, and effort to consume, yet implicit in most consumer research is the availability of these resources, particularly money. While the literature provides an explanation of many aspects of consumption experiences, an explanation of how money is used to fund consumption is needed.

Methodology

In the present research, I explore ordinary consumer behaviors through depth interviews with individuals regarding everyday experiences to develop an understanding of the relationship between earmarking money and consumption.

Findings

Prior research finds consumers earmark monies thereby allocating it to distinct purposes, such that this earmarking influences consumer behaviors. Emergent from these data, I find evidence for two categories of consumer behaviors: protective, which are those addressing responsibilities in daily life; and, prospective which are those for shaping and representing identity. Further, I find protective or prospective behaviors are systematically associated with earmarking of money to either indexical or prosaic accounts, respectively, to fund consumption in support of the behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores everyday experiences to develop an understanding of how monetary earmarks are used to fund consumption. Other resources necessary for consumption, specifically time and effort, were not examined, yet are influential in consumption experiences and therefore are in need of study.

Originality/value of chapter

These findings contribute a distinct pattern of funding evident in the relationship between types of earmarks and categories of everyday behaviors.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-811-2

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Olivia Johnson and Veena Chattaraman

Using identity theory, this paper aims to explore differences in socially responsible signaling behavior based on the salience of a personal or social identity.

Abstract

Purpose

Using identity theory, this paper aims to explore differences in socially responsible signaling behavior based on the salience of a personal or social identity.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was used to study the relationship among identity commitment, salience, and signaling behavior.

Findings

Findings revealed personal identity salience mediated the relationship between socially responsible commitment and socially responsible social-signaling consumption behavior.

Practical implications

The results of the study suggest that Millennials engage in socially responsible activities as a result of a salient personal identity. Millennials use socially responsible behavior to signal their benevolence to themselves and others.

Originality/value

This is the first research that has examined the relationship between Millennials’ socially responsible consumption behavior and a salient personal or social identity.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Adekunle Oke, Jasmina Ladas and Moira Bailey

This study aims to explore the motivation as well as barriers for ethical food consumption behaviour by focussing on the food consumption pattern of young adults in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the motivation as well as barriers for ethical food consumption behaviour by focussing on the food consumption pattern of young adults in the North East of Scotland. Considering the recent involvement of young adults in environmental activism, consumption behaviour of young adults in the North East of Scotland, an oil-based community, presents essential research interest to understand whether young adults often contemplate the consequences of their lifestyle.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored the perceptions of ten purposive recruited young adults using semi-structured interviews to understand factors underpinning consumer's decision-making towards ethical food products.

Findings

The study reveals three key factors influencing ethical food consumption behaviour among young adults. The findings show that personal health and well-being are the main reasons why consumers engage in ethical food consumption. Also, it is observed that information facilitates decision-making by raising awareness regarding the social, environmental and health consequences of food production and consumption. Further, the findings show that situational attributes, such as product price and product availability, are creating dissonance when engaging in ethical food consumption.

Originality/value

This study contributes to sustainability research and the ongoing debate on consumerism by exploring ethical food consumption behaviour and highlights the need to address situational challenges, such as product price and availability. The study suggests that interventions to address current consumption patterns should also emphasise the social and personal benefits of food consumption rather than the environmental benefits that have been the focus of prior research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Norhayati Zakaria, Wan-Nurisma Ayu Wan-Ismail and Asmat-Nizam Abdul-Talib

The purpose of this research is to understand the importance of value orientation on conspicuous consumption in the youth market segment in Southeast Asia. In particular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand the importance of value orientation on conspicuous consumption in the youth market segment in Southeast Asia. In particular, the focus is to understand three different types of value orientation (specifically cultural values, material values and religious values) and its effects on conspicuous consumption behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative theoretical model is proposed based on Hofstede's cultural dimension, the materialism value scale and religious commitments to predict the relationship for the value orientations of Generation Y's (Gen Y's) conspicuous consumption behaviour. The data was collected from undergraduate students enrolled in general education courses in three universities in Malaysia. Using cross-sectional data, 262 sets of valid questionnaires were used to perform the statistical analysis for the measurement and structural model using partial least squares equation modelling (PLS-SEM) path modelling.

Findings

We position our study by raising the pertinent question of “Seriously, Conspicuous Consumption?” to establish a clear understanding of whether Malaysian Gen Y individuals are conspicuous consumers and, if they are, which of the three values matter the most. In order to answer the question of whether Malaysian Gen Y engages in conspicuous consumption, we arrive at an understanding that, given multi-value orientations, conspicuous behaviour can be motivated and impacted by one value orientation and constrained by others. Hence, value orientation offers an insightful explanation of one specific type of consumer behaviour in the context of Asia as an emerging global market. Thus, our study provides two key theoretically significant findings. In general, our findings provide insights into how the multi-value orientations (i.e. cultural, material and religious orientations) contribute to several bodies of literature—namely, conspicuous consumption, international marketing and transcultural marketing. The results revealed that collectivism and materialism were positively and significantly related to conspicuous consumption. Uncertainty avoidance, although significant, had a negative relationship with conspicuous consumption. The other values (masculinity, power distance and religious values) were not significantly related to conspicuous consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Purchasing luxury goods is becoming an emergent phenomenon in Asia, particularly among young consumers. This paper provides marketing managers, particularly brand owners, with practical and realisable examples of how to plan and execute their marketing plans. A more profound understanding of this relationship may also serve to aid marketing managers in devising more focused marketing strategies and thus allocate marketing resources more efficiently. Hence, marketers could develop an effective communication strategy so that the target consumers will be aware of their goods because the purchase of luxury goods is likely to be motivated by social, cultural and personal factors.

Originality/value

This article examines the impact of value orientations on conspicuous consumption behaviour in Malaysian Gen Y consumers. The model proposed in this study is useful in predicting conspicuous consumption among Gen Y. By identifying the factors influencing this emergent type of consumer behaviour, global retailers will be informed about this particular market segmentation in terms of its preferences and desires. The article discusses the research findings and concludes with managerial implications and limitations.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Soha Abutaleb, Noha M. El-Bassiouny and Sara Hamed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religiosity in online collaborative consumption contexts. It analyzes the impact of religiosity in influencing consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of religiosity in online collaborative consumption contexts. It analyzes the impact of religiosity in influencing consumer life decisions and behaviors. The proposed framework is based on the norm activation theory (NAT) with religiosity added to it based on the extant literature. The paper aims to provide implications for marketing researchers and practitioners derived from its analysis and propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The current paper proposes a model for marketing researchers to consider the role of religiosity as a cultural and psychological factor in influencing online collaborative consumption. The NAT is adopted as the base of the conceptual model. The model posits research propositions on the potential interaction of religiosity with existing relationships in the theory to predict online collaborative consumption behavior.

Findings

The NAT is considered a prominent model in studying pro-environmental behaviors and it was adopted in various studies. Some researchers adopted the theory to study collaborative consumption as a pro-environmental behavior. Religiosity was found to significantly impact pro-environmental behaviors, but no research was found regarding its impact on collaborative consumption. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research and implications to marketing practitioners about the role of religiosity in influencing collaborative consumption behavior.

Originality/value

Although there were few research studies that exist in discussing the role of religiosity in explaining consumer behavior, it could be argued that this paper is the first of its kind, according to the best of the authors’ knowledge, that discusses the role of religiosity in online collaborative consumption contexts through the use of NAT.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Kagiso Matjila, Leeford Edem Kojo Ameyibor and Yvonne Saini

This paper aims to estimate the effects of three socialization agents in the form of advertising exposure, parental influence and peer influence and effects of personal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate the effects of three socialization agents in the form of advertising exposure, parental influence and peer influence and effects of personal attitude on youth alcohol consumption behaviour in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation model was used to test the proposed conceptual model of four hypotheses based on the validated survey data gathered from 300 youth in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Findings

Empirical results show that advertising, parental influence, peer influence and personal attitude has positive effects on youth alcohol consumption behaviour, with advertising and personal attitude exhibiting statistical significance on alcohol consumption behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The study involves only youthful demographic in the age range of 18–35 and hence suffers from generalizability. The cross-sectional design also limits the findings with respect to time.

Practical implications

It provides policymakers insights into important factors to focus on changing drinking behaviour in South Africa.

Social implications

It also improves the understanding of how consumer socialization agents and personal attitudes affect alcohol consumption of young people in South Africa and help deal with the problem through policy changes and social marketing interventions.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to estimate three socialization agents and personal attitude of youth in alcohol consumption behaviour in an emerging market context.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Faisal Shahzad, Jamshed Khan Khattak, Mobeen Jamshed Khattak and Fahad Shahzad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how consumers’ socialization influences soft drink consumption behavior in Pakistan. Since consumer socialization has long been…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how consumers’ socialization influences soft drink consumption behavior in Pakistan. Since consumer socialization has long been considered but it is important to understand whether the extent of consumer socialization in terms of soft drink consumption influences consumer behavior by taking into consideration consumer cohorts.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research is based on consumer survey method by using Likert scale questionnaire. Convenience sampling technique with a sample size of 637 is used. Data are analyzed by using cronbach α, ANOVA, correlation and multiple regressions.

Findings

Overall, the findings maintain the impact of consumer socialization on soft drink consumption. Such influence of consumer socialization through social media, cultural groups and social groups encourages soft drink socialization behavior. Additionally there is also an evidence of mediating role of consumer generational behavior in soft drink consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper extend knowledge of how consumer socialization affects soft drink consumption behavior and provide important insights into how consumer cohorts should be targeted. The Chosen research approach is a limitation of the study.

Practical implications

The results are of value to academic researchers, soft drink industry practitioners in a way that it will help them to portray marketing and advertising activities by taking into consideration consumer cohorts behavior.

Social implications

This paper addresses an untapped issue on how cohorts socialization at different social setting impact on consumer soft drink consumption behavior.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a recognized need to study soft drink socialization in terms of cohort’s behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Daniel Fischer, Tina Böhme and Sonja Maria Geiger

Promoting sustainable consumption among young consumers has become a key priority on the research agenda in such different fields as education for sustainable development…

Abstract

Purpose

Promoting sustainable consumption among young consumers has become a key priority on the research agenda in such different fields as education for sustainable development, environmental psychology and consumer policy. Progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of sophisticated research instruments capable of measuring consumption behaviors that are relevant both in terms of their sustainability impacts and their suitability for teenagers. This study aims to address this research gap and presents a scale for young consumers’ sustainable consumption behaviors (YCSCB) in the areas of food and clothing.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale was developed in a two-step, mixed-methods approach. In an initial qualitative interview study, the actual behaviors of theoretically selected young consumers (n = 8) were identified with regard to acquiring, using and disposing of consumer goods in the areas of food and clothing. The YCSCB scale was constructed using the findings of this qualitative study and then validated in a subsequent quantitative study (n = 155).

Findings

The YCSCB scale is a valid and reliable scale to measure young consumers’ sustainable consumption behavior in the areas of food (n = 14 items) and clothing (n = 13 items).

Originality/value

The findings of this research provide a twofold contribution to advancing research on YCSCB. Firstly, it presents a consolidated scale that is explicitly constructed for teenagers and their consumption contexts. Secondly, it proposes a heuristic for developing more sophisticated measurements of SCB among young consumers that would allow a comparison between studies, is focused on behaviors (instead of confounding behaviors with intentions, attitudes or values) and is impact-oriented in terms of sustainability relevance.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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