Search results

1 – 10 of 363
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2015

Marianne Snow and Margaret Robbins

This article examines, elementary leveled graphic history, a genre of literature relatively untouched by research. Due to graphic nonfiction’s growing popularity in the realm of…

Abstract

This article examines, elementary leveled graphic history, a genre of literature relatively untouched by research. Due to graphic nonfiction’s growing popularity in the realm of children’s literature and its potential benefits for young readers, teachers may want to incorporate this genre of literature into their social studies curriculum. Despite the genre’s appeal, educators should be careful when introducing graphic histories to their students, as nonfiction texts of any kind can possibly contain inaccuracies and biases that might foster misconceptions. In this study, we used a critical content analysis approach to investigate both images and text in four graphic histories on the Battle of the Alamo. We found these books contain several instances of factual errors and biased perspectives. After our analyses, we discussed implications for using these types of books in the classroom to help students enhance critical literacy skills. We connected recommended critical literacy activities to Common Core State Standards for informational texts and writing.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1979

Jim Davies

This paper gives an overview of the developing educational policy information network and shows how this European initiative together with parallel initiatives in the UK have lead…

Abstract

This paper gives an overview of the developing educational policy information network and shows how this European initiative together with parallel initiatives in the UK have lead to the establishment of the Educational Policy Information Centre (EPIC) project at the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). The LEA experiment, within the EPIC framework is outlined. Similarities and differences in approach and actual and potential problems at both the Community and the UK level are set out.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

Vivienne McLoughlin and Jim Davies

Traditionally only home economics, biology, social history and geography have made substantial contributions to nutrition education in schools. More recently, however, two reports…

Abstract

Traditionally only home economics, biology, social history and geography have made substantial contributions to nutrition education in schools. More recently, however, two reports have emphasised nutrition education as an integral part of health education. These reports have not advocated a separate discrete course of health education but have recommended a policy of coverage of health education topics through a range of subjects, a policy which will require much close collaboration between the subjects involved. In this article some of the issues underlying this approach and their implications will be discussed, as this development is intimately related to the central role now played by nutrition education in the debate about health education in schools.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Katherine Jane Lamb, Jim Davies, Richard Bowley and John-Paul Williams

The purpose of this paper is to present the use of simulation in both the development and assessment of Fire & Rescue Service incident commanders. Continuous development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the use of simulation in both the development and assessment of Fire & Rescue Service incident commanders. Continuous development and assessment is required due to a reduction in incident numbers causing skill fade.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper details the development and implementation of the “Introspect model” of assessment by Oxfordshire Fire & Rescue Service (OFRS) over a five-year time-span, and discusses its key findings in line with current decision-making ideologies and principles.

Findings

The “Introspect model” provides a unique assessment and development tool, which adheres to current national guidelines. It is also an accredited component of incident commander development within OFRS. The authors propose that this model becomes “best practice” for other Fire and Rescue Services.

Practical implications

The national use of the “Introspect model” will ensure that all incident commanders benefit from understanding the rationale behind their decisions, striving towards a universal state of unconscious competence within incident command nationally on the fire-ground.

Originality/value

The originality/value of this paper lies in an in-depth analysis of simulation-based software for the development and assessment of incident commanders. This paper is the first to suggest a model of “best practice” regarding the assessment and development of Fire and Rescue Service incident commanders.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

William Baker

79

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2003

Yoram Amiel and John A. Bishop

The purpose of Volume 10 is to collect together original research papers on fiscal policy (taxes and transfers) and inequality. The first two chapters of Volume 10 address…

Abstract

The purpose of Volume 10 is to collect together original research papers on fiscal policy (taxes and transfers) and inequality. The first two chapters of Volume 10 address methodological issues in tax progressivity measurement. John Creedy examines the questions of to what extent can redistribution be achieved using a structure of consumption taxes with different rates and exemptions. The paper shows that progressivity is maximized when only one commodity group is taxed, the commodity group with the largest total expenditure elasticity. Generalizing this result, Creedy shows that the tax rate should fall as the total elasticity falls. Creedy illustrates his approach using data on Australia’s indirect tax system. In Chapter 2 Lea Achdut, Yasser Awad, and Jacques Silber propose an alternative way to define tax progressivity as a function of marginal, not average tax rates. Changes in tax progressivity indices are usually defined in terms of changes in average tax rates, while changes in tax policy are usually stated in terms of changes in marginal tax rates. Thus, this paper fills a gap between theory and applied work. They apply their approach to study the progressivity of Israel’s National Insurance tax system.

Details

Fiscal Policy, Inequality and Welfare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-212-2

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Susan Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to describe processes of learning from personal experiences of mental distress when mental health service users participate in occupational therapy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe processes of learning from personal experiences of mental distress when mental health service users participate in occupational therapy education with tutors and students who have also had experiences of mental distress.

Design/methodology/approach

A post-structural theoretical perspective was applied to stories which emerged from the research process. Semi-structured group and individual interviews were used with three service users, three students and three tutors (including the author) who had all had, at some time in their lives, experiences of mental distress.

Findings

Stories based on previously hidden personal experiences of mental distress began to shift dominant understandings. Further, as educators, service users challenged whose authority it is to speak about mental distress and permitted different narrative positions for students and tutors. However, technologies of power and technologies of self of powerful discourses in professional education continued to disqualify and exclude personal knowledges. Learning from stories requires a critical approach to storytelling to expose how hidden power relations maintain some knowledges as dominant. Further, learning requires narrative work, which was often hidden and unaccounted for, to navigate complex and contradictory positions in learning.

Social implications

Although storytelling based on personal experience can help develop a skilled and healthy mental health workforce, its impact will be limited without changes in classrooms, courses and higher education which support learning at the margins of personal/professional and personal/political learning.

Originality/value

Learning from stories of mental distress requires conditions which take account of the hidden practices which operate in mental health professional education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Daniel Parker and Gina Grandy

This paper aims to explore how varsity football athletes and coaches negotiate meanings when faced with the unmet expectations of a new head coach brought into lead a turnaround…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how varsity football athletes and coaches negotiate meanings when faced with the unmet expectations of a new head coach brought into lead a turnaround process. It also aims to pay particular attention to the role of history in this meaning making process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on semi‐structured interviews with players and coaches at two points in time. To preserve the richness of their experiences and illuminate the historical aspects of change, it focuses on the stories of three players and one supporting coach.

Findings

Numerous symbols of change emerge that have multiple and contradictory meanings. The meanings around success and failure are renegotiated over time as individuals struggle with the unmet expectations of change. Moreover, individuals are unable to shed the failures of the past and move forward.

Practical implications

Change is a complex and messy process of managing multiple meanings. Understanding change entails more than a snapshot picture of an organization. New leaders have no control over the past, yet they need to be aware of how individuals experienced the past in order to increase the likelihood of success in the present.

Originality/value

Success and failure are experienced as an ongoing process as athletes and coaches experience, reflect on and interact with others. In illuminating the role of history in how change is experienced in the present, the paper demonstrates that the past can serve as both an immobilizing force, as well as a comparative point enabling individuals to rationalize their emotions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Peter McGill

243

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

1 – 10 of 363