Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study

Mana Khalifa Almheiri, Syed Zamberi Ahmad and Abdul Rahim Abu Bakar

Expected learning objectives students will be able to examine the possible reasons for a company’s poor performance using relevant business tools. Students will be able to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Expected learning objectives students will be able to examine the possible reasons for a company’s poor performance using relevant business tools. Students will be able to critically assess the role of technology and social media in the gem and jewellery industry in Dubai. Students will be able to analyse the customer segmentation approach used by five diamonds and to critically analyse its advantages and disadvantages. Students will be able to use the SWOT framework to identify the key weaknesses of and threats to five diamonds and identify the strengths and opportunities that the company needed to capitalize on, to be more competitive in the industry and generate high profitability. Students will be able to critically analyse the fit between the firm’s current business strategy and its business environment and develop a “turnaround” strategy.

Case overview/synopsis

Five diamonds were a trading company that dealt in gems and jewellery, natural pearls and branded watches. The company had been founded by Mustafa Al Fardan in 2003 and was currently run by his son Mohammed Al Fardan who held the position of General Manager. The company was based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) with two local branches and eight international branches in China, France, India, Switzerland, Hong Kong and the UK. The branches were located in Palm Strip Jumeirah and in the Jumeirah Al Naseem Hotel, in the Umm Sequim area. The Palm Strip Jumeirah region is one of the largest and crowded areas in Dubai with world-class facilities such as hotels, clinics, restaurants, beaches and clubs, making it a perfect location for tourists. The Umm Sequim region is in the same area where the iconic seven-star hotel, Burj Al Arab, is located. The place is also a “must be” place for tourists and has recorded a significant increase in traffic at different times of the year. Despite their strong presence locally and internationally, the firm was facing fierce competition from the hostile business environment. Industry trends and the business environment were changing the local and global gems and jewellery industry landscape. These changes had offset five diamonds’ business strategy and its long-held business tradition. As a result, the company yearly profit had started to plummet. The company needed to revise its existing business strategy and the way it operated in the market. Failure to do so would have resulted in the firm missing the huge growth opportunity and also put itself into jeopardy.

Complexity academic level

This case is useful for undergraduate and postgraduate students majoring in marketing, business management and/or strategic management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Fabian Maximilian Johannes Teichmann

This paper aims to illustrate how white-collar criminals launder money in the jewellery business.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how white-collar criminals launder money in the jewellery business.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 white-collar criminals and 50 compliance and prevention experts in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein and Switzerland. Following the qualitative content analysis of their responses, a quantitative survey of 200 compliance officers was then conducted in the same geographical area. These two methods reveal the concrete techniques used by money launderers and the compliance industry’s (lack of) awareness.

Findings

The jewellery business is susceptible to laundering money. It facilitates both the placement and layering of incriminated assets.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings of the qualitative study are based on semi-standardised interviews, they are limited to the 100 interviewees’ perspectives.

Practical implications

The identification of concrete methods of money laundering provides valuable insight into criminal activity for compliance officers, law enforcement agencies and legislators. A more profound understanding of the methods used by criminals should foster more effective crime prevention.

Originality/value

While prior literature predominantly focusses on the organisations and mechanisms aimed at fighting money laundering, this paper considers how criminals avoid detection by exploring both prevention experts’ and criminals’ perspectives.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Beulah Pereira, Kevin Teah, Billy Sung and Min Teah

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth interview with the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Larry Jewelry, a luxury jeweller with boutiques in Hong Kong and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth interview with the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Larry Jewelry, a luxury jeweller with boutiques in Hong Kong and Singapore. Given the ever-evolving luxury jewellery market in South East Asia, it is paramount to understand the success factors of the luxury jewellery sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth interview approach is used to understand the antecedents of the success of the luxury jewellery sector. Specifically, this paper presents a complex business model of Larry Jewelry and an in-depth interview with the CEO of Larry Jewelry for current insights in the sector.

Findings

This paper highlights the history of Larry Jewelry, its product segments and the key elements of its business blueprint. Specifically, the success of Larry Jewelry is attributed to its business model and strong branding on quality, craftsmanship, rarity, human interaction and trust.

Originality/value

Despite the substantial growth in the luxury jewellery sector, there is relatively little research on the success factors of this industry, especially in South East Asia. The current research provides practical insights into business blueprint of a successful luxury jeweller in Hong Kong and Singapore.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ganesan Kannabiran and Saumen Bhaumik

This paper aims to examine how creative industries can adopt supply chain management (SCM) approaches to achieve business excellence.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how creative industries can adopt supply chain management (SCM) approaches to achieve business excellence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on case research of supply chain (SC) integration in a jewellery‐manufacturing organisation.

Findings

Organisations in the creative industries such as jewellery can achieve superior performance through systematic supply chain planning and implementation. Integrating SC planning with business planning, persistent commitment of the top management and making use of cross‐functional teams for implementation are some of the key determinants of SCM.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a basis for understanding the scope for adopting SCM approaches in creative industries. Future research may be directed to identify and evaluate the parameters of successful adoption of SCM approaches in other creative industries. The research has the generic limitation of generalisability. However, it provides an insight into understanding the issues of SCM adoption in a developing country context.

Practical implications

Practitioners are required to use cross‐functional teams for SCM implementation, choose unique approaches to manage supply chain performance and exploit native talents in creative industries.

Originality/value

The paper brings out the key aspects of supply chain integration in creative industries with specific reference to a developing country.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article

Heba Mohamed Adel and Raghda Abulsaoud Ahmed Younis

This paper aims to study the impact of innovation climate (IC) on co-creating modular mass-customisation (CMMC) in terms of cost effectiveness, volume effectiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the impact of innovation climate (IC) on co-creating modular mass-customisation (CMMC) in terms of cost effectiveness, volume effectiveness, responsiveness, product modularity and collaborative assembly. Additionally, this research paper investigates the effect of IC and CMMC on the value to customer (VC) in a modular jewellery emerging market that includes international companies.

Design/methodology/approach

After conducting a comprehensive literature review, the authors suggested a conceptual framework and examined it using mixed methods approach. In addition to qualitative focus groups, questionnaires were filled – across five-point Likert scale format – through 63 depth interviews carried out with subject-matter-experts working at 14 international organisations in the Egyptian modular jewellery market. SmartPLS software was used for structural equation modelling analysis.

Findings

Results showed that CMMC positively and significantly affects VC. Furthermore, IC positively and significantly affects both CMMC and VC.

Practical implications

Recent industrial developments that can be observed in such international modular jewellery sector can be enhanced by the empirical evidence of this research regarding the importance of developing IC for more creative manufacturing approach of modular mass-customisation and better VC.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, it is the first empirical study that investigates the relationship between CMMC, IC and VC in a unique jewellery market, which recently generated high customer involvement in the assembly/reassembly processes. Conceptually and empirically, it consolidates and adds to the literature of production and operations management (mass-customisation), organisational studies and innovation science (organisational climate for innovation) and applied social sciences.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Alessandro Brun and Antonella Moretto

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of contract design in overcoming critical demand management (DM) issues in the luxury jewellery industry. The goals are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of contract design in overcoming critical demand management (DM) issues in the luxury jewellery industry. The goals are the identification of the main critical issues of the DM process and the analysis of the contribution of contract re‐design to solve them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows an exploratory approach using a case‐based methodology. Data are collected through a sample composed of four brand‐owning companies and 37 multi‐brand retailers in the luxury jewellery industry.

Findings

The paper offers insights into contract design in the luxury jewellery industry. In particular, the critical issues of the DM process determined by inadequate contract design are identified, thus highlighting their influence on the critical success factors of luxury companies. In addition to the characteristics the contract should have to overcome the critical issues have been proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides initial insights into the important role of contract management in jewellery luxury companies. To date, the analysis is predominantly qualitative and not sufficiently statistically significant to generalise the results.

Practical implications

This paper raises a number of important issues for jewellery brand owners who are reluctant to consider the retailer's perspective in a collaborative way during the DM process.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first attempts to study contract design specifically applied to jewellery luxury companies, with a main focus on the DM process.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Helena Mäkinen

This paper proposes a holistic, resource-based strategy framework for design-oriented industries consisting mainly of small firms. It consists of three main concepts: (1…

Abstract

This paper proposes a holistic, resource-based strategy framework for design-oriented industries consisting mainly of small firms. It consists of three main concepts: (1) sources of competitive advantage, especially core competencies, (2) competitive advantage, and (3) competitive strategy. The idea behind the framework is that sources of competitive advantage form the competitive advantages of firms, and these together influence the choice of competitive strategies. The proposed framework was developed on the basis of interview results from the jewellery industry in Finland. A total of 44 small firms each employing less than 25 people were interviewed. Respondents felt that the two most important core competencies were in the area of manufacturing. They were the abilities to design and manufacture products of high technical quality and to offer a broad range of products and attractive models. For the jewellery industry, competitive advantage was largely achieved through various aspects of design. The competitive strategy type most employed was the differentiation-based strategy. The proposed framework should be of value in integrating some of the diverse research in this area and suggesting specific relationships that might be the focus of future empirical studies.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ahmad Jamal and Mark M.H. Goode

Previous research indicates that the self‐image product image congruity (commonly known as self‐image congruence) can affect consumers’ product preferences and their…

Abstract

Previous research indicates that the self‐image product image congruity (commonly known as self‐image congruence) can affect consumers’ product preferences and their purchase intentions. Self‐image congruence can also facilitate positive behaviour and attitudes toward products. This paper reports findings from a research study which was conducted to determine the effect of self‐image congruity on brand preference and satisfaction in the precious jewellery market in the UK. A questionnaire was sent to 500 consumers of precious jewellery in five major cities of the UK. Results indicate that self‐image congruity was a very strong predictor of consumers’ brand preferences and a good predictor of consumer satisfaction. Respondents with higher levels of self‐image congruity were more likely to prefer the brand and enjoy higher levels of satisfaction with the brand as compared to those with lower levels of self‐image congruity. The paper discusses the implications for brand managers so that they can position their brands in an effective way.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Bino Paul GD, Anantha Padhmanabha Achar, Krishna Muniyoor and Venkatesh Murthy R.

This paper aims to investigate the factors that determine the performance of small business units using a field survey conducted in a small jewellery cluster in Mangalore…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the factors that determine the performance of small business units using a field survey conducted in a small jewellery cluster in Mangalore district of Karnataka state (India).

Design/methodology/approach

The estimates of the median-based quantile regression model are used to analyse how a change in small firm output is determined by seven key factors such as year of establishment, the source of finance, the source of design, lack of demand, design done by the staff, the number of skilled workers, and constraints.

Findings

The study finds that the factors such as sources of finance, design, customer relation and skilled manpower are the major determinants of the growth of jewellery business. Based on the findings, the study suggests that the invigoration of business performance by high degree of competitiveness, coupled with technological advancement and hiring of skilled labour, is essential for the sustainability of jewellery units.

Originality/value

The study pinpoints the problems and prospects of traditional business units located in an industrial cluster. Further, it suggests the different ways of strengthening the performance of small business units in India.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

LESLIE KENTON

VERTICAL integration can cause a company a lot of headaches. There was a time when Ratner's had their share, but no longer.

Abstract

VERTICAL integration can cause a company a lot of headaches. There was a time when Ratner's had their share, but no longer.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

1 – 10 of over 3000