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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

Jennifer Clark and Jennifer Platt

Packed lunches now provide the midday meal for large numbers of children. There is, however, little information available on the contents of those packed lunches or on the…

Abstract

Packed lunches now provide the midday meal for large numbers of children. There is, however, little information available on the contents of those packed lunches or on the nutritional thought behind them. Jennifer Clark, a community dietitian with Brighton Health Authority and Jennifer Platt, Reader in Sociology at the University of Sussex decided, therefore, to conduct a survey among schoolchildren in Sussex, to find out what they were eating and, if possible, why. Here is an outline of their investigation.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 84 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2023

Claire Rasmussen

The narrative of The Americans weaves together a spy thriller and a family drama, though it drives home the inseparability of the political and the personal through the lives of…

Abstract

The narrative of The Americans weaves together a spy thriller and a family drama, though it drives home the inseparability of the political and the personal through the lives of the central characters, Philip and Elizabeth, a couple whose marriage is a cover for their work as Soviet spies. This chapter provides a queer reading of their marriage, drawing from the real history of the Cold War politics of sexuality that associated American values with the hetero- and gender normative, white, and middle-class nuclear family. In contrast, the Soviet Union was understood to have disrupted this natural order by installing the state as an overbearing patriarch. Philip and Elizabeth’s fictional cover as a nuclear family requires them to perform American marriage, family, and selfhood. In doing so, they reflect the centrality of the family in America’s Cold War self-image in which the family serves as the anchor of the American order, enabling economic and political self-sufficiency. Their performance of the family challenges our ability to differentiate between real, authentic family that can serve as the legitimate source of social reproduction and between the counterfeit, fake family that disrupts the social order. The queer family, refusing to be placed beyond realm of the political by the moral language of family values, subverts our ability to distinguish between genres since the family drama is already a political thriller.

Details

Law, Politics and Family in ‘The Americans’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-995-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Jennifer Clark

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Harry Messel, Harold Wyndham, L.C. Robson and Robert Menzies were instrumental in bringing about substantial change in science…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Harry Messel, Harold Wyndham, L.C. Robson and Robert Menzies were instrumental in bringing about substantial change in science curriculum and infrastructure reform in NSW schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on substantial archival research including materials never before examined or used by historians of education history. The paper is divided into sections, the first uses teacher surveys and identifies problems with science teaching in 1958, a key year in education history and each section after that looks at the contribution of Wyndham, Messel, Robson and Menzies in driving a new direction for science education.

Findings

The research found that Wyndham, Messel, Robson and Menzies each contributed a new dimension to the reform of science education in Australia. Their individual contributions were substantial, inter-related and interlocking but quite different. The paper argues that it is not adequate to look at science education reform purely as a means to introduce State Aid, rather science education reform was advocated as a means to ensure students had a scientific literacy going forward into a technologically driven future.

Research limitations/implications

The research strikes a path through a vast primary source record to outline how individuals and science teachers more generally believed in science education reform as a mechanism to ensure students were better placed to enter a post-Sputnik world. As a result, known arguments around State Aid are only part of the story and not the main focus of the research. The aim is to supplement that knowledge by looking more at a broader picture for science reform for its own sake.

Originality/value

This paper takes an original approach to the history of curriculum change by providing a broader context for the State Aid debate, that is, by focussing on individual contributions to science education reform for its own sake and because science education was deemed necessary for student literacy in the future. At the same time it uses archival material never before accessed or used to tease out this history. The teachers’ surveys provide a unique insight into conditions for science teachers in the late 1950s. This material has not been accessed before and it provides a context upon which to superimpose the impact of the contributions of Wyndham, Messel, Robson and Menzies.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2023

Caroline Wolski, Kathryn Freeman Anderson and Simone Rambotti

Since the development of the COVID-19 vaccinations, questions surrounding race have been prominent in the literature on vaccine uptake. Early in the vaccine rollout, public health…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the development of the COVID-19 vaccinations, questions surrounding race have been prominent in the literature on vaccine uptake. Early in the vaccine rollout, public health officials were concerned with the relatively lower rates of uptake among certain racial/ethnic minority groups. We suggest that this may also be patterned by racial/ethnic residential segregation, which previous work has demonstrated to be an important factor for both health and access to health care.

Methodology/Approach

In this study, we examine county-level vaccination rates, racial/ethnic composition, and residential segregation across the U.S. We compile data from several sources, including the American Community Survey (ACS) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) measured at the county level.

Findings

We find that just looking at the associations between racial/ethnic composition and vaccination rates, both percent Black and percent White are significant and negative, meaning that higher percentages of these groups in a county are associated with lower vaccination rates, whereas the opposite is the case for percent Latino. When we factor in segregation, as measured by the index of dissimilarity, the patterns change somewhat. Dissimilarity itself was not significant in the models across all groups, but when interacted with race/ethnic composition, it moderates the association. For both percent Black and percent White, the interaction with the Black-White dissimilarity index is significant and negative, meaning that it deepens the negative association between composition and the vaccination rate.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is only limited to county-level measures of racial/ethnic composition and vaccination rates, so we are unable to see at the individual-level who is getting vaccinated.

Originality/Value of Paper

We find that segregation moderates the association between racial/ethnic composition and vaccination rates, suggesting that local race relations in a county helps contextualize the compositional effects of race/ethnicity.

Details

Social Factors, Health Care Inequities and Vaccination
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-795-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Rachel G. Ragland

An investigation of how secondary history teacher education candidates implemented research-based instructional practices for instruction is described as a model of pre-service…

Abstract

An investigation of how secondary history teacher education candidates implemented research-based instructional practices for instruction is described as a model of pre-service teacher preparation for social studies teachers. Cohorts of candidates participated in a five-year project while enrolled in a discipline-specific capstone senior methods course and subsequent student teaching experiences. Candidates were surveyed and interviewed concerning their use of, and feelings about, twelve instructional strategies developed with a focus on authentic history pedagogy. Surveys were administered three times: before the secondary social studies methods course, after the methods course, and after student teaching. A variation on the Concerns-Based Adoption Model was used to measure the levels of use and stages of concern of the candidates. Artifacts of practice, including lesson plans from a model unit plan and actual student teaching, also were analyzed to document use of the strategies. Results indicate an increasingly high level of implementation of and comfort with the strategies, as well as the developmental nature of the process. Implications and recommendations for pre-service activities in history teacher education are presented.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Abstract

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-454-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-629-3

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Emily Player, Emily Clark, Heidi Gure-Klinke, Jennifer Walker and Nick Steel

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the vulnerability of individuals living with tri-morbidity and the complexity of care required to serve this patient group, moreover to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the vulnerability of individuals living with tri-morbidity and the complexity of care required to serve this patient group, moreover to consider how a life course approach may assist.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case study of a death of a young male adult experiencing homelessness and tri-morbidity in the UK and comparison of the mortality data for homeless adults in the UK with the general population. A synopsis of the mental health and health inclusion guidance for vulnerable adults is used.

Findings

This paper found the importance of considering a life course approach and the impact of negative life events on individuals living with tri-morbidity and also the role of specialist services to support the complex needs of vulnerable adults including the importance of multi-disciplinary working and holistic care.

Research limitations/implications

The research implications of this study are to consider how individuals living with tri-morbidity fit in to evidence-based care.

Practical implications

The practical implication is to consider that those living with tri-morbidity have extra-ordinary lives often with a high concentration of negative life events. Therefore, an extra-ordinary approach to care maybe needed to ensure health inequalities are reduced.

Social implications

This paper is an important case highlighting health inequalities, specifically mortality, in the homeless population.

Originality/value

This paper is an original piece of work, with real cases discussed but anonymised according to guidance on reporting death case reports.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Ray Wall, Nii Ankrah and Jennifer Charlson

The purpose of this paper is to assess the views and experiences of mediators from different professional backgrounds practising in the construction industry. Previous research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the views and experiences of mediators from different professional backgrounds practising in the construction industry. Previous research shows that the legal profession dominates construction mediation in both England and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

The phenomenological approach was used to capture the lived experiences of the interviewees and gain insight into their views and practices. The data collection was by semi-structured interviews. The data was then analysed using software to establish themes.

Findings

The major difference in mediator practice discovered between the two groups is the use of the evaluative style by lawyer and facilitative style by non-lawyer mediators. Non-lawyer mediators strongly reported their criticisms of the evaluative style in mediation suggesting that it undermines the parties’ ability to self-determine their own dispute and reduces the level of satisfaction experienced by the parties in the process of mediation. Lawyer mediators supported the use of the evaluative style as an acceptable compromise on the parties’ self-determination and feelings of satisfaction in pursuit of achieving the goal of a settlement in mediation, which was significantly better than the escalation of stress and costs to the parties in the event that the dispute escalates to litigation. In addition, mandatory mediation, the role of advisors/advocates, governance and the future of mediation were explored.

Originality/value

The research is anticipated to be of particular benefit to parties considering referring a construction dispute to mediation.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

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