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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Abstract

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Gender, Sex and Gossip in Ambridge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-948-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

R. Kerry Turner and Jane Powell

Future waste management in the UK will have to address the problemof rising costs of waste disposal. The current financial costs oflandfill disposal represent an under pricing of…

Abstract

Future waste management in the UK will have to address the problem of rising costs of waste disposal. The current financial costs of landfill disposal represent an under pricing of the waste assimilative capacity of the environment. Economic, social and political pressures over the coming decade will serve to force up disposal costs closer to the “true” economic cost to society. The cost rise will have important positive ramifications for waste minimisation and waste recycling. It is argued that rational decision making in the waste management context has been made more difficult in the UK because of a series of failures: information failure; lack of “systems” thinking; institutional failure; lack of economic cost‐benefit thinking.

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Environmental Management and Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Sophie Dilworth, Isabel Higgins, Vicki Parker, Brian Kelly and Jane Turner

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine multidisciplinary, group clinical supervision sessions and to extend current understandings of the barriers/enablers to the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine multidisciplinary, group clinical supervision sessions and to extend current understandings of the barriers/enablers to the implementation of an innovative psychosocial intervention for distressed adults with cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

Discourse analysis was used to analyse audio recordings from clinical supervision sessions delivered as part of a psychosocial intervention within the context of a randomised control trial (RCT).

Findings

Examination of subject positions, representation and tensions reveals that Health Professionals can resists the pressures of systemic barriers to provide much‐needed psychosocial support for distressed adults with cancer. Critical examination of multidisciplinary clinical supervision sessions describes how Health Professionals are able to construct new meanings and reposition themselves as being able to provide supportive care within the context of their everyday practices.

Research limitations/implications

This paper reports only a small part of a larger analysis that aims to explore how discourse maps the current state of psychosocial care for adults with cancer and illustrates the fragility and potential for change in this area.

Originality/value

Extension on the previous literature is seen within the data through the presence of positive resistance against systemic barriers. Previous exploration of clinical supervision has not collected data generated within the sessions. It is also novel in the use of discourse analysis being used in association with a randomised controlled trial to understand the situational complexities associated with bringing about practice change.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Suzie Dunn

When discussing the term “technology-facilitated violence” (TFV) it is often asked: “Is it actually violence?” While international human rights standards, such as the United…

Abstract

When discussing the term “technology-facilitated violence” (TFV) it is often asked: “Is it actually violence?” While international human rights standards, such as the United Nations' Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (United Nations General Assembly, 1979), have long recognized emotional and psychological abuse as forms of violence, including many forms of technology-facilitated abuse (United Nations, 2018), law makers and the general public continue to grapple with the question of whether certain harmful technology-facilitated behaviors are actually forms of violence. This chapter explores this question in two parts. First, it reviews three theoretical concepts of violence and examines how these concepts apply to technology-facilitated behaviors. In doing so, this chapter aims to demonstrate how some harmful technology-facilitated behaviors fit under the greater conceptual umbrella of violence. Second, it examines two recent cases, one from the British Columbia Court of Appeal (BCCA) in Canada and a Romanian case from the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), that received attention for their legal determinations on whether to define harmful technology-facilitated behaviors as forms of violence or not. This chapter concludes with observations on why we should conceptualize certain technology-facilitated behaviors as forms of violence.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Jane Turner and Clare Warren

In 1976, in a speech at Ruskin College, Oxford, Prime Minister James Callaghan asked ‘Why is it that such a high proportion of girls abandon science before leaving school?’ …

Abstract

In 1976, in a speech at Ruskin College, Oxford, Prime Minister James Callaghan asked ‘Why is it that such a high proportion of girls abandon science before leaving school?’ (Gillard, 2018). Little has changed over the last 40 years; a recent report from the National Audit Office (2018, p. 28) stated that only 8% of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) apprenticeships were taken up by women in 2016/2017 and that the shortage of STEM skills in the workforce is a key UK economic problem. However, just as the Aldridge marriage has been the source of considerable interest and the site of significant financial investment in terms of designer kitchens and expensive holidays, so has the issue of ‘girls in science’ been a consistently debated topic and taken up a large chunk of government and industry spending. Research (Archer et al., 2013) suggests that although children enjoy their science experiences in school, too few pupils aspire to a STEM career. It reveals that the pupils most likely to aspire to careers in science are those whose families have high ‘science capital’ which ‘refers to the science-related qualifications, understanding, knowledge (about science and “how it works”), interest and social contacts (e.g. “knowing someone who works in a science-related job”)’ (Archer et al., 2016, p. 3).

Episodes of The Archers are full of scientific talk, from herbal leys to plate meters. This chapter looks at how the science capital in Ambridge is shared. Why is Alice Carter an engineer and not Emma Grundy? Will Kiera Grundy choose physics A level? Who are the female STEM role models? How can the concept of science capital help us to understand the career paths of Ambridge residents? Will the young girls of Ambridge remedy the gender imbalance in STEM careers?

Details

Gender, Sex and Gossip in Ambridge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-948-9

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Grant Bage and Jane Turner

The primary school in any rural village is a significant and vivid institution. Its classrooms, playground, buses, staffroom, governing body, PTA committee, religious…

Abstract

The primary school in any rural village is a significant and vivid institution. Its classrooms, playground, buses, staffroom, governing body, PTA committee, religious celebrations, educational visits and community events are a focus not just for village pride but for parental and social aspirations and tensions. Village schools are special local spaces, in which the bite is keenly felt of national education policies. They are sources and sites of friendships, rivalries and divisions amongst both children and adults; places where celebrations and disappointments occur on a daily basis; an important local employer and reliant on a range of committed volunteers. Village schools are genuinely lively and dramatic places.

But not in The Archers. The mostly invisible children of Ambridge simply board a bus to Loxley Barrett aged five, then mysteriously alight aged 11 at Borchester Green or the fee-paying Cathedral School. During those primary years Ambridge’s children, parents and listeners seem blissfully unaffected by tests, snow, bullying, crazes, curriculum change, poor teachers, brilliant teaching assistants, academisation, Ofsted inspections, fussy governors, budget crises or any other rural educational reality.

In this chapter we consider why primary education, a topic that dominates the lives and conversations of real village families from all backgrounds, seems to be of such insignificance to the inhabitants of Ambridge?

Details

Custard, Culverts and Cake
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-285-7

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Nicola Patterson, Sharon Mavin and Jane Turner

This feminist standpoint study aims to make an empirical contribution to the entrepreneurial leadership and HRD fields. Women entrepreneur leaders' experiences of gender will be…

1937

Abstract

Purpose

This feminist standpoint study aims to make an empirical contribution to the entrepreneurial leadership and HRD fields. Women entrepreneur leaders' experiences of gender will be explored through a framework of doing gender well and doing gender differently to unsettle the gender binary.

Design/methodology/approach

Against a backcloth of patriarchy, a theoretical gender lens is developed and a feminist standpoint research (FSR) approach taken in this study. There are five case studies of women entrepreneur leaders operating small businesses across North East England in sectors of IT, law, construction, beauty, and childcare. In each case study a two‐stage semi‐structured interview process was implemented and the women's voices analysed through a framework of doing gender well and differently.

Findings

This paper highlights the complexities of gender experiences offering four themes of women entrepreneurs' experiences of gender within entrepreneurial leadership: struggling with entrepreneurial leadership; awareness of difference; accepting and embracing difference; and responding to difference, which are offered to challenge the gender binary and capture the complexities of how gender is experienced.

Research limitations/implications

The field must begin to shift its focus from the dominant masculine discourse to foster understandings of gender experiences by using gender as an analytical category to enable the field to truly progress.

Social implications

Women are still an under‐represented group within entrepreneurship and within the higher echelons of organisations. This requires greater attention.

Originality/value

This feminist study calls for both scholars and practitioners to analyse critically their underlying assumptions and bring a gender consciousness to their HRD research and practice to understand gender complexities within entrepreneurial leadership and organisational experiences more widely.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Jane Turner and Sharon Mavin

The purpose of this paper is to explore subjective life histories and leadership journeys of senior leaders, drawing upon elements of an authentic leadership framework (life…

2762

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore subjective life histories and leadership journeys of senior leaders, drawing upon elements of an authentic leadership framework (life trigger events, values and emotions). The paper surfaces partial life histories and the often unheard of individual experiences of becoming a leader, offering stories to others as a media for learning and extending authentic leadership theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon a qualitative empirical study engaging 22 UK senior leaders in semi‐structured interviews, involving a life‐history approach to generate subjective narratives of how individuals establish and sustain leadership.

Findings

The empirical data highlights that elements of authentic leadership theory resonate in practice. Senior leaders' life histories and in particular negative trigger events are significant to their approach as leaders. The values of honesty and integrity were important to the leaders, with some able to sustain their values uncompromisingly. The leaders openly expressed emotion and vulnerability when re‐telling their stories, but whether they do so as leaders in relationships with others, requires further research. Authentic leadership theory may be over simplified in terms of emotion and vulnerability in practice.

Practical implications

Elements of authentic leadership offer alternative understandings of experiences of leaders. The life history approach enables important insights into leaders' subjective realities and should be integral to leadership development approaches.

Originality/value

The paper offers empirical data from UK senior leaders, highlighting the unheard of strutting and fretting of leadership and contributing empirical research to authentic leadership theory.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Nicola Patterson, Sharon Mavin and Jane Turner

The purpose of this paper is to explore the convergence of female entrepreneurship, women in management and leadership fields from a gender perspective to bring a gender…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the convergence of female entrepreneurship, women in management and leadership fields from a gender perspective to bring a gender consciousness to the development and construction of the emerging entrepreneurial leadership theory base.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual paper that argues for the convergence of the entrepreneurship and leadership fields to enable an interchange of ideas, and learn from the developments within each field from a gender perspective. Whilst scholars have recently begun to explore the concept of entrepreneurial leadership, these early developments have remained gender blind, gender defensive and gender neutral.

Findings

A central argument is that female entrepreneur leader's experience social role incongruity. In order to be perceived by their followers as credible and legitimate entrepreneurial leaders, women are expected to manage their dual presence across the symbolic spaces of femininity and masculinity, doing gender well and doing gender differently to meet social role expectations of being a woman, whilst also meeting dominant masculine constructions of leadership and entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

This paper extends understandings of entrepreneurial leadership, highlighting the importance of foregrounding gender, to make visible and integrate the historical developments of gender within the entrepreneurship and leadership fields. Both scholars and practitioners must “unlearn” and “rethink” our learnt state of being in relation to gender, leadership and entrepreneurship in order to move beyond the “given” and disrupt masculinities' hierarchical superiority.

Originality/value

The paper argues that blends of agentic and communal behaviours must be recognized as accessible to both women and men for effective entrepreneurial leadership. This will provide female entrepreneurial leaders the fluidity to do both and be something else as a person. Offering understandings of gender to extant gender blind, gender neutral and gender defensive constructions of entrepreneurial leadership will progress understandings of the framework emerging from this conceptualization.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Jane Turner, Sharon Mavin and Sonal Minocha

To critique individual learning experiences in organization, explore the role people play in inhibiting learning in organization and explore theories of individual learning as…

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Abstract

Purpose

To critique individual learning experiences in organization, explore the role people play in inhibiting learning in organization and explore theories of individual learning as “theories in use”, drawing on a metaphor of steps and dance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a subjective qualitative approach engaging in semi‐structured interviews with individual participants and narrative data analysis. A metaphor of “steps” and “dance” is used to analyse narrative data and theories “in use”; the “steps” imply a fixed form which constrains the individual within the confines of the job role, while the “dance” relates to a fluidity and flexibility which enables individuals to express movement and therefore learning.

Findings

Empirical data reveal a level of “not learning” in practice and raise the significance of both upward and downward feedback and questioning in learning levels. Results highlight the management‐employee relationship and the crucial role of managers in unlocking or inhibiting individual learning. In “Scriptorg” individuals are trapped in a cycle of “not learning” or at best single loop learning; new steps are inhibited by the management approach and there is no evidence of “dancing” in learning terms.

Originality/value

The paper examines theoretical insights in practice through case study exploration to highlight the significance of managers in inhibiting individual learning in organization and reinforces that practitioners should focus on interventions that unlock managerial learning, addressing the psychological and behavioural characteristics of managers, consequently enabling individuals to dance.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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