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1 – 9 of 9
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi, John C. Munene and Isaac Nkote Nabeta

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of social capital in financial literacy and financial inclusion relationship in rural Uganda. The major aim is to…

2169

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of social capital in financial literacy and financial inclusion relationship in rural Uganda. The major aim is to establish the role of social capital in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts and uses MedGraph programme (Excel version 3.0), Sobel and Kenny and Baron tests to test the mediation effect of social capital in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion.

Findings

The results reveals that social capital is a significant mediator in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of rural poor in Uganda. Financial literacy did not have a direct effect on financial inclusion, but through full mediation of social capital. Existence of social capital into the relationship boosts the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion by 61.6 per cent among rural poor households in Uganda. Thus, the finding suggests that with the absence of social capital, financial literacy may fail to enhance the level of financial inclusion among rural poor households in Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopted only single research approach using a questionnaire. However, future research through interview may be of importance. Besides, for the purpose of triangulation, a study involving financial institutions’ staff may be viable. Moreover this study was limited by the fact that it was cross-sectional. Furthermore, a longitudinal study may be useful in future to investigate the mediating impact of social capital spanning over a long period of time.

Practical implications

Managers, policymakers and financial inclusion practitioners should advocate and embark on building social capital among rural communities, so as to improve on the level of financial inclusion.

Originality/value

While a large body of research has been carried out on financial literacy, this paper is the first to test the mediating role of social capital in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion, especially in rural Uganda. This study generates evidence and contributes to the powerful influence of social capital in enhancing the level of financial inclusion based on financial literacy.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Michael Omeke, Pascal Ngoboka, Isaac Nabeta Nkote and Isaac Kayongo

Enterprise growth drives competitiveness, innovations, employment creation, income generation and social inclusion in societies. The purpose of this paper is to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise growth drives competitiveness, innovations, employment creation, income generation and social inclusion in societies. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of networking on the relationship between dynamic capabilities and enterprise growth of financial cooperatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional survey and quantitative study of 269 financial cooperatives based on structural equation modelling and bootstrapping techniques analysis.

Findings

The results reveal that dynamic capabilities are vital in promoting the growth of financial cooperatives. In addition, networking partially enhances the contribution of dynamic capabilities to the growth of financial cooperatives. Therefore, dynamic capabilities and networking play a key role in promoting the growth of financial cooperative enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

This was a cross-sectional survey. It did not trace the changes in behavioural and attitudinal aspects of enterprise growth over time. A longitudinal approach is recommended.

Practical implications

It is imperative that managers of financial cooperatives enhance their coordination, learning and competitive response capabilities through consultation, exchange and sharing of information among staff and other stakeholders, to increase the membership, capital and income volumes, depicting growth of financial cooperatives.

Originality/value

This study provides an insight on the mediating effect of networking on the enterprise growth of financial cooperatives in developing countries founded on networks theoretical framework. Unlike previous studies that modelled direct relationship of enterprise growth.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Anthony Moni Olyanga, Isaac M.B. Shinyekwa, Muhammed Ngoma, Isaac Nabeta Nkote, Timothy Esemu and Moses Kamya

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of innovation indicators: Internet usage, patent rights, innovation in exporting countries and innovation in the importing…

1222

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of innovation indicators: Internet usage, patent rights, innovation in exporting countries and innovation in the importing country on the export competitiveness of firms in the East African Community (EAC).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted the structural gravity model and the Poisson Pseudo Maximum Likelihood a nonlinear estimation method that was applied in STATA on balanced panel data from 2007 to 2018. Data were obtained from World Bank International Trade Center and World Bank development indicators.

Findings

Results show that innovation in the importing country, innovation in the exporting country and patent rights of exports are positive and significant predictors of export competitiveness in developing countries. While Internet usage is an insignificant predictor in the EAC.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to examine the complicated nature of the EAC economy to further this study's findings.

Practical implications

Exporting countries need to take deeper reforms as regards structural transformation to enable firms to integrate into the Global Value Chains (GVCs) to enable them to increase their productivity by reviewing the existing policies to match the changes in the market.

Originality/value

This study explains the complex dynamic interactions of technological innovation indicators in the EAC using quantitative data and that this interaction has an effect on the export competitiveness in import-oriented countries with less harmonization in their trade policies.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2022

Anthony Moni Olyanga, Isaac M.B. Shinyekwa, Muhammed Ngoma, Isaac Nabeta Nkote, Timothy Esemu and Moses Kamya

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of export logistics components: shipment arrangements, timely delivery, customs quality, trade infrastructure, and tracking…

3968

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of export logistics components: shipment arrangements, timely delivery, customs quality, trade infrastructure, and tracking and tracing on export competitiveness of firms in the East African Community (EAC).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted the Structural Gravity Model and the Poisson pseudo-maximum likelihood (PPML). PPML a nonlinear estimation method was applied in STATA on a balanced panel data for the period of 2007–2018. Data were obtained from World Bank International Trade Centre (ITC), World Bank Logistics Performance Index (LPI) and World Bank development indicators.

Findings

Results show that timely delivery and tracking and tracing of exports are positive and significant predictors of export competitiveness in EAC countries. Conversely, shipment arrangements, customs quality and trade infrastructure have no influence on export competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study show that export logistics components of shipment arrangements, customs quality and trade infrastructure do not matter at the present in improving export competitiveness in the EAC. There is a need to examine the intricate nature of the EAC economy to further this study's findings.

Practical implications

The EAC partner states should embrace deep integration by removing the behind the border trade barriers in addition to other trade restrictions, to create a common economic space among member states. This will further shrink the delivery time and the tracking and tracing of exports hence improving the competitiveness of EAC exports within the region and outside. Also, common and harmonized trade policies and regulations should be implemented through mutual recognition agreements where countries agree to recognize one another's conformity assessments.

Originality/value

This study explains the complex dynamic interactions of export logistics factors in the EAC using quantitative data and that this interaction has an effect on the export competitiveness in import-dominated countries with less harmonization in their trade policies.

Details

Modern Supply Chain Research and Applications, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3871

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2024

Christopher Neil Makanga, Laura A. Orobia, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Isaac Nkote Nabeta, Rachel Mindra Katoroogo and John Munene

This paper seeks to provide a multi-theoretical explanation of the living practice of a public entity found in Uganda, an African developing country, which successfully enhanced…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a multi-theoretical explanation of the living practice of a public entity found in Uganda, an African developing country, which successfully enhanced public accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative narrative enquiry through storytelling was used to portray the practices of public accountability. The perceptions of various individuals were obtained using in-depth interviews, from which a coherent story structured under the themes of context, actions, results and lessons was obtained.

Findings

Findings show that public entities that put in place oversight mechanisms and management structures, involve stakeholders and create an ethical work climate enhance public accountability. The results further show that the integration of theories (agency, stewardship, stakeholder and ethical work climate) promotes public accountability.

Research limitations/implications

In terms of limitations and areas for future research, the study has been conducted on a single city authority to explain public accountability. Perhaps there is a need to conduct similar studies with other city authorities or a combination of organizations. The study has used a qualitative methodology through narrative enquiry to explain public accountability. Future studies can use a quantitative methodology, more so to test the proposed conceptual model of public accountability. Despite the study limitations, the results of this study remain relevant.

Practical implications

This study uses the positive story of a public entity from a developing country that successfully practiced public accountability. Consequently, from a practical perspective, the findings of this study can be used as a benchmark for promoting effective public accountability practices, especially in developing countries across the globe, where public accountability has proven to be a challenge. Furthermore, governments in developing countries can also use the study findings to strengthen public accountability policies in their respective countries.

Social implications

The study suggests that enhancement in public accountability practice requires an approach that brings together a multiplicity of factors. The study affords public accountability practitioners an opportunity to replicate the successful accountability practices from the story. When public accountability is enhanced, service delivery in terms of social services by the public organizations is likely to improve, leading to better quality of life in the communities served.

Originality/value

The study is novel in its use of a positive story that depicts an entity from a developing country that successfully enhanced public accountability. To explain this phenomenon, the study uses a multi-theoretical approach, unlike prior studies.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2023

Jennifer Nabaweesi, Twaha Kaawaase Kigongo, Faisal Buyinza, Muyiwa S. Adaramola, Sheila Namagembe and Isaac Nabeta Nkote

The study aims to explore the validity of the modern renewable energy-environmental Kuznets curve (REKC) while considering the relevance of financial development in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore the validity of the modern renewable energy-environmental Kuznets curve (REKC) while considering the relevance of financial development in the consumption of modern renewable energy in East Africa Community (EAC). Modern renewable energy in this study includes all other forms of renewable energy except traditional use of biomass. The authors controlled for the effects of urbanization, governance, foreign direct investment (FDI) and trade openness.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data of the five EAC countries of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda for the period 1996–2019 were used. The analysis relied on the use of the autoregressive distributed lag–pooled mean group (ARDL-PMG) model, and the data were sourced from the World Development Indicators (WDI), World Governance Indicators (WGI) and International Energy Agency (IEA).

Findings

The REKC hypothesis is supported for modern renewable energy consumption in the EAC region. Financial development positively and significantly affects modern renewable energy consumption, whereas urbanization, FDI and trade openness reduce modern renewable energy consumption. Governance is insignificant.

Originality/value

The concept of the REKC, although explored in other contexts such as aggregate renewable energy and in other regions, has not been used to explain the consumption of modern renewable energy in the EAC.

Details

Technological Sustainability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2754-1312

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2023

Jennifer Nabaweesi, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Faisal Buyinza, Muyiwa Samuel Adaramola, Sheila Namagembe and Isaac Nabeta Nkote

Modern renewable energy is crucial for environmental conservation, sustainable economic growth and energy security, especially in developing East African nations that heavily use…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern renewable energy is crucial for environmental conservation, sustainable economic growth and energy security, especially in developing East African nations that heavily use traditional biomass. Thus, this study aims to examine urbanization and modern renewable energy consumption (MREC) in East African community (EAC) while controlling for gross domestic product (GDP), population growth, foreign direct investment (FDI), industrialization and trade openness (TOP).

Design/methodology/approach

This study considers a balanced panel of five EAC countries from 1996 to 2019. Long-run dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and fully modified ordinary least squares estimations were used to ascertain the relationships while the vector error-correction model was used to ascertain the causal relationship.

Findings

Results show that urbanization, FDI, industrialization and TOP positively affect MREC. Whereas population growth and GDP reduce MREC, the effect for GDP is not that significant. The study also found a bidirectional causality between urbanization, FDI, TOP and MREC in the long run.

Practical implications

Investing in modern renewable energy facilities should be a top priority, particularly in cities with expanding populations. The governments of the EAC should endeavor to make MREC affordable among the urban population by creating income-generating activities in the urban centers and sensitizing the urban population to the benefits of using MREC. Also, the government may come up with policies that enhance the establishment of lower prices for modern renewable energy commodities so as to increase their affordability.

Originality/value

MREC is a new concept in the energy consumption literature. Much of the research focuses on renewable energy consumption including the use of traditional biomass which contributes to climate change negatively. Besides, the influence of factors such as urbanization has not been given significant attention. Yet urbanization is identified as a catalyst for MREC.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Juma Bananuka, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Rachel Katoroogo Mindra and Isaac Newton Kayongo

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of and impact of gender diversity and intellectual capital on compliance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability…

1801

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of and impact of gender diversity and intellectual capital on compliance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting standards by Uganda manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from manufacturing firms in Uganda using a questionnaire survey to find out their perception of compliance with the GRI standards. Data were analyzed using statistical package for social sciences, Microsoft Excel and smart partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS–SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that on average, manufacturing firms in Uganda comply with GRI sustainability reporting standards to the extent of 59%. The results further indicate that manufacturing companies comply more with the GRI 200 (economic performance disclosures) to the extent of 63% as compared with 55% for GRI 300 (environmental performance disclosures) and 58% for GRI 400 (social performance disclosures). The results also indicate that intellectual capital has a significant impact on the GRI-based sustainability performance disclosures in Uganda. However, board gender diversity has no significant effect. In terms of the control variables, only firm size is significant, while firm age, capital structure and auditor type are not.

Originality/value

This study provides first time evidence of the extent of compliance with the GRI sustainability reporting standards using evidence from Uganda – an African developing country. This study widens the understanding of the usage of GRI standards in the preparation of sustainability reports by manufacturing firms in an emerging economy. This study also provides first-time evidence on the role of gender diversity and intellectual capital in GRI-based sustainability performance disclosures using evidence from Uganda's manufacturing sector.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Lawrence Musiitwa Kyazze, Isa Nsereko and Isaac Nkote

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between cooperative practices of accountability, cooperative ownership, advanced communication and non-financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between cooperative practices of accountability, cooperative ownership, advanced communication and non-financial performance in savings and credit cooperative societies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a cross-sectional research design and adopted a mixed methodological approach were hypotheses were statistically tested using structural equation modeling based on survey data (n = 220) and narratives from qualitative findings supported the quantitative findings from savings and credit cooperative societies.

Findings

The findings reveal that cooperative practices of accountability, cooperative ownership and advanced communication are significantly and positively associated with non-financial performance of savings and credit cooperative societies.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence on the relationship between cooperative practices of accountability, cooperative ownership and advanced communication and non-financial performance in savings and credit cooperative societies in emerging economies like Uganda. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is limited or no study that has used the construct of agency theory in explaining the relationship between cooperative practices and non-financial performance in savings and credit cooperative societies.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

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