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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Boris Urban and Zethu Dlamini

Public policy supported by effective institutions is one of the key strategies for promoting entrepreneurial activities. However, the problem is that an enabling…

Abstract

Purpose

Public policy supported by effective institutions is one of the key strategies for promoting entrepreneurial activities. However, the problem is that an enabling environment that supports entrepreneurship is often lacking in several African countries. The aim of this article is to deepen our understanding of the mix of policy and institutional factors which create an enabling environment for enterprise growth in Swaziland.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data are sourced from 200 enterprises across Swaziland's main regions and hypotheses are statistically tested using correlational and regression analyses.

Findings

Results show that a mix of different institutional and state support factors such as access to markets, education and training, access to finance, contract enforcement, regulations and business support programmes all have a significant and positive impact on enterprise growth.

Research limitations/implications

Study implications relate to the need for specific and targeted policy interventions required to foster an enabling environment in order to stimulate enterprise growth in Swaziland.

Originality/value

Empirical investigations on enterprise growth in under-researched developing market contexts, such as Swaziland, are important since in many developing and emerging markets small enterprises are at the epicentre of the economy Moreover, this study adds to the stream of research highlighting that the application of institutional theory provides a detailed theoretical understanding of the actors and the process by which enterprise policy is formulated.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Lew Perren

This research examines micro‐enterprises pursuing gradual growth. While very little research has been targeted specifically at the growth of micro‐enterprises, there are a…

Abstract

This research examines micro‐enterprises pursuing gradual growth. While very little research has been targeted specifically at the growth of micro‐enterprises, there are a host of possible influencing factors suggested by the rather broader small business literature. Less research has attempted to integrate the factors that influence growth of small firms into some form of model. Those models that were found had a number of shortfalls when it came to understanding the development of micro‐enterprises. A framework has been developed through this research that addresses these shortfalls. First, it has targeted specifically gradual growth micro‐enterprises; secondly, it is rigorously under‐pinned through empirical research; thirdly, it attempts to comprehensively cover the range of factors that influence development; fourthly, it focuses on the complex interaction of factors that may influence development. The research findings and implications are presented in two parts. Part 1 develops an empirically verified framework that explains how growth is influenced by a myriad of interacting factors. This leads to a discussion of the policy implications of the framework. Part 2 is presented in the next edition of the Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development (JSBED) and will explore the managerial implications of the framework. This will provide a diagnostic toolkit to help micro‐enterprise owner‐managers and advisers pursue growth. The paper is derived from research conducted initially for the submission of a PhD thesis at the University of Brighton (Perren, 1996).

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Michael Omeke, Pascal Ngoboka, Isaac Nabeta Nkote and Isaac Kayongo

Enterprise growth drives competitiveness, innovations, employment creation, income generation and social inclusion in societies. The purpose of this paper is to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise growth drives competitiveness, innovations, employment creation, income generation and social inclusion in societies. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of networking on the relationship between dynamic capabilities and enterprise growth of financial cooperatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional survey and quantitative study of 269 financial cooperatives based on structural equation modelling and bootstrapping techniques analysis.

Findings

The results reveal that dynamic capabilities are vital in promoting the growth of financial cooperatives. In addition, networking partially enhances the contribution of dynamic capabilities to the growth of financial cooperatives. Therefore, dynamic capabilities and networking play a key role in promoting the growth of financial cooperative enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

This was a cross-sectional survey. It did not trace the changes in behavioural and attitudinal aspects of enterprise growth over time. A longitudinal approach is recommended.

Practical implications

It is imperative that managers of financial cooperatives enhance their coordination, learning and competitive response capabilities through consultation, exchange and sharing of information among staff and other stakeholders, to increase the membership, capital and income volumes, depicting growth of financial cooperatives.

Originality/value

This study provides an insight on the mediating effect of networking on the enterprise growth of financial cooperatives in developing countries founded on networks theoretical framework. Unlike previous studies that modelled direct relationship of enterprise growth.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Chung‐Ching Chiu, Chih‐Hung Tsai and Yi‐Chan Chung

In the early industrial age which with high intensity of machine and labor, using financial measurement index was good enough to tie in company’s mechanization and…

Abstract

In the early industrial age which with high intensity of machine and labor, using financial measurement index was good enough to tie in company’s mechanization and philosophy of management and been in efficiency. But being comply with “New Economic age,” a new economic environment is full of knowledge and information, the enterprise competition had changed from tangible assets, plants to intangible innovation ability of knowledge. As recognizing the new tendency by enterprise, they value gradually the growth and influence from learning. Practice of organization learning not only needs firm structure and be in coordination with both hardware and software, but also needs an affect measurement model to offer enterprise to estimate learning performance. It’s a good instrument of financial performance measure mold in the past years, But it’s for measuring the past, couldn’t formulate enterprise trend to future, hard to estimate investment for future, such as development of products, organization learning, knowledge management etc, as which intangible assets and knowledge ability just the key factors of being win around competition environment in the future. In 1992, Kaplan and Norton brought up Balance Scorecard (BSC) on Harvard Business Review, as an instrument helping enterprise to measure performance, which is being considered to be a most influence management instrument. It added non‐financial index such as customer, internal process and learning growth besides traditional financial index, as offering enterprise an index to measure and manage intangible assets and intellectual property. As being aware of organization learning is hard to be ignored in the new economic age, this research is based on learning and growth of BSC, and citing one national material company try to let the most difficult measurement performance of organization learning, to be estimate through BSC, analyze of factor and individual case, to discuss the company how to make the related strategy and vision of organization learning to develop learning and growth of the structure of BSC, subject the matter of out put factors to be discussed, and measure the outcomes as a result of research. The research affect offers (1) the base implement procedure of carrying out BSC; (2) the reference of formulating measurement index while enterprise using BSC to estimate performance of organization learning; (3) the possibility bottleneck maybe forcing while carrying out BSC, to be an improvement or preventive for enterprise.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Xiaojun Du, He Liu, Lingjing Bao and Peng Huang

This paper aims to investigate the relationships between the strategic type of cross‐border mergers and acquisitions (M&As) and enterprise growth, and the moderating role…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationships between the strategic type of cross‐border mergers and acquisitions (M&As) and enterprise growth, and the moderating role of Chinese companies' organizational factors, including organizational structure, organizational experience, cultural distance and relative size.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors, as researchers, have mixed the strategic choice and post‐M&As integration into a comprehensive framework while building the theoretical model of “Strategic Type of Cross‐border M&As‐Organizational Factors‐Enterprise Growth” (ST‐OF‐EG). In this paper, they have empirically examined the model using hierarchical regression by analyzing 76 cross‐borders M&A events of overseas‐listed Chinese companies over the 2000‐2007 period.

Findings

The analysis shows that: related cross‐border M&As are better for enterprise growth than unrelated diversification cross‐border M&As; and among the organizational factors, studied organizational structure and organizational experience show a positive significance in terms of the relationship between the strategic type of cross‐border M&As and enterprise growth. The moderating role of cultural distance and relative size is non‐significant.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, the moderating effect of cultural distance was found to be insignificant. However, further research is encouraged.

Practical implications

Chinese companies should pay attention to strategic choices before cross‐border M&As. They should expand abroad to markets step by step. They should merge the companies that have the higher relevance on a product, industry or market first. On the basis of specialization, Chinese companies should make themselves stronger and then develop from specialization to proper diversification, which is a robust path to achieve enterprise growth. Besides, Chinese companies should accumulate international experience as soon as possible and organizational structure should match the strategic choice.

Originality/value

This paper would be immensely helpful to Chinese companies to plan their cross‐border M&As strategy in a way that would enhance growth and core‐competence.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Saila Tykkyläinen

The purpose of this study is to extend theoretical understanding on social enterprisesgrowth orientation. Inspiration is drawn from the fundamentals of prospect theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to extend theoretical understanding on social enterprisesgrowth orientation. Inspiration is drawn from the fundamentals of prospect theory and threat-rigidity theory, as the role of external threats as a source of growth orientation is largely absent from the social enterprise growth literature. According to previous studies, social enterprises grow mainly because of their social mission and social opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative research is conducted by analysing thematic interviews from seven, growth-oriented social enterprises operating in Finland.

Findings

The study provides novel insights on social enterprisesgrowth orientation by drawing attention to the plurality of growth motivations and showing the importance of perceived threats as the origin of their growth pursuits. Goals of growth are defined mainly in terms of organisational and financial performance of the firm.

Practical implications

Social enterprise managers and boards are encouraged to cooperate in analysing the significance of external threats and opportunities for their business and to concentrate on defining measurable social goals to ensure balanced growth.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates that the behavioural theories offer a beneficial departure point for studying social venture growth. By clarifying the role of the perceptions of the firm’s internal actors and showing that growth is sometimes seen as a response to external threats, the study increases theoretical understanding on social enterprisesgrowth orientation.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Jianguo Fang and Huiwu Guo

Firm growth in industry clusters is a complex issue. On the one hand, industrial clusters can promote firm growth. On the other hand, they can restrict the growth of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Firm growth in industry clusters is a complex issue. On the one hand, industrial clusters can promote firm growth. On the other hand, they can restrict the growth of a firm in some aspects. Their various effects have to be analyzed in detail. The purpose of this paper is to examine these effects and the law of enterprise growth in electronic information industry clusters of China.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper makes use of the panel data of the Chinese manufacturing industry with the intention of testing Gibrat's law. It carries out an empirical analysis on the influence of Chinese electronic information industry clusters on firm growth.

Findings

The result of the present research indicates that industry clusters definitely have a positive impact on firm growth, profit and longevity. However, in regard to the firms' data of China 2006 to 2007, the electronic information industry clusters have negative effects on scale of business growth of small and medium‐sized companies but not big companies. Moreover, the innovation of companies inside a cluster could not catch up with that of companies outside the cluster.

Originality/value

For the electronic information enterprises, growth rate is positively correlated with the enterprise age. Gibrat's law is tenable, that is, firm growth mainly depends on firm age. In Chinese electronic information industry clusters, R&D has only a weak influence on enterprise growth. In contrast, the economic soundness of the region where the electronic information industry clusters are located is more beneficial to the growth of enterprises in the cluster.

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Zhang Jin, Yang Huixin and Lv Ruizhan

The purpose of this paper is to locate those entrepreneur human capital elements which significantly influence an enterprise's growth performance, within both high‐tech…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to locate those entrepreneur human capital elements which significantly influence an enterprise's growth performance, within both high‐tech and traditional enterprises, thereby helping entrepreneurs understand that human capital elements will provide different impacts within different industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Under some necessary research assumptions, the statistical analysis described in this paper uses data collected from a questionnaire survey and is performed under the SPSS16.0 Program.

Findings

An enterprise growth model is built from the perspectives of entrepreneur human capital. Analysis shows that human capital elements of the same entrepreneur have different impacts on the performance of business growth in different industries. The theoretical model provides a better explanation of the high‐tech enterprises' growth performance. Innovation and business growth performances from a high‐tech enterprise have greater reliance on human capital of entrepreneurs than the traditional industries.

Originality/value

Most current studies of the human capital of entrepreneurs focus on the analysis of background characteristics, but inadequate attention has been given to the relationship between human capital and the enterprises' growth performance, as well as to the comparative analysis of entrepreneurs' human capital in high‐tech enterprises and traditional enterprises. This paper, however, compares and analyzes such relationships between high‐tech enterprises and traditional enterprises.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Peter Jenner

The purpose of this paper is to examine social enterprise sustainability by comparing recent international research with prior findings seeking to identify the important…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine social enterprise sustainability by comparing recent international research with prior findings seeking to identify the important factors that facilitate social enterprise development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a concurrent, convergent mixed methods approach on a sample of 93 social enterprise leaders using surveys and face-to-face interviews. The participants were sourced from a cross-section of social enterprise organisational types from urban and regional locations in Australia and Scotland.

Findings

The findings support prior research, identifying resourcing, organisational capabilities, collaborative networks and legitimacy as influential in the success of social enterprises. However, the research contributes new knowledge by revealing an overarching growth orientation as the dominant factor in the strategic management for sustainability of these ventures. This growth orientation is generally associated with the intent to achieve profitability. Thus, social enterprise managers view a commercially focused growth orientation as an overarching strategic factor that underpins organisational sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper delivers new insights into the strategic orientation of social ventures of benefit to policy makers and practitioners alike. The findings are significant for policy makers providing perspectives into how governmental assistance can be targeted to develop sustainable social enterprises, particularly the need to support the growth of these ventures. Similarly, practitioners are alerted to the strategic imperatives of incorporating a commercially focused growth orientation and the latent potential that exists in the networks of social enterprise.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2009

Andrew McAuley and Peter Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to explore how realistic ambitions for growth are in craft micro‐enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how realistic ambitions for growth are in craft micro‐enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents observations from a series of studies of the craft sector in the UK. These were large‐scale questionnaires focusing on socio‐economic characteristics.

Findings

While many owners express an ambitious desire for growth, the question of whether that desire is at all realistic is often not explored in studies. By linking ambition to the skills required to develop the product, a better classification of the enterprise is developed.

Research limitations/implications

This work begins to create a research agenda for understanding growth in the micro‐enterprise.

Practical implications

By focusing on the level of skill needed to produce the product, it is argued that a more workable approach to understanding growth ambitions can be achieved, while at the same time allowing policy makers to identify which enterprises to support and on which to focus limited resources.

Originality/value

Studies of the craft sector are relatively few. The data set from which these observations are drawn is the best available. The attempt to dig below stated ambitions by linking it to the skills required is a new contribution.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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