Search results

1 – 10 of over 81000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ambika Zutshi and Amrik S. Sohal

Management systems and standards have become a key part of the organisation's lifeline and a prerequisite for survival in the twenty‐first century. Systems for quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Management systems and standards have become a key part of the organisation's lifeline and a prerequisite for survival in the twenty‐first century. Systems for quality environmental and occupational health and safety (OHS) now form the three main pillars of the organisation, the fourth one being financial accounting. In light of the increasing pressure and demands from different stakeholders, it is becoming necessary for organisations to adopt the different systems/standards. However, to achieve the benefits from the implementation and subsequently maintenance of these systems it is only a practical and logical step that the existing management systems/standards be integrated into a single system.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the experiences of three Australian‐based organisations that have successfully undertaken the integration of their management systems/standards. Data for this paper were collected through in‐depth interviews conducted with the managers responsible for quality, environment and OHS systems.

Findings

The interviews revealed a number of quantifiable and unquantifiable benefits experienced by the companies from operating one integrated system, such as saving of dollars, better utilisation of resources and improved communication across the organisation, to name a few. However, for the benefits to be realized it is essential that organisations are aware of the challenges and obstacles accompanying integration of systems/standards. If these challenges are not addressed early in the process they can delay the completion of the integration process.

Originality/value

Recommendations for other organisations contemplating integrating their management system include: obtaining commitment from the top management; having adequate resources to integrate the systems; having communication and training across the organisation in aspects of integration; and, last but not the least, having integrated audits. Implementation of these recommendations may vary from one organisation to another; however, it would result in lesser resistance for the organisations following them.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jennifer L. Cox and Susie A. Skarl

An urgent topic of conversation among government documents librarians today is the need for training, in both the use of federal depository collections and the provision…

Abstract

An urgent topic of conversation among government documents librarians today is the need for training, in both the use of federal depository collections and the provision of reference services for these collections. Two trends that have pushed this issue to the forefront in recent years are the proliferation of electronic resources and the fact that, in many institutions, government documents reference services are being integrated into general reference service points. This selective bibliography focuses on recent articles that present a substantially detailed account of training and educational programs for everything from ongoing professional development training for staff to course‐integrated instruction for students, and will serve as a resource for librarians involved in these educational efforts.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Richard Holden

Discusses Marks & Spencer′s application of computer‐basedtraining (CBT) in training its food supervisors. CBT is used to enhancethe transfer of learning following training

Abstract

Discusses Marks & Spencer′s application of computer‐based training (CBT) in training its food supervisors. CBT is used to enhance the transfer of learning following training input using workbooks. Argues that the particular application is a very powerful and effective use of CBT, illustrating the real potential of CBT when integrated with other training techniques. Reflects on how such an application may assist in the development of CBT more generally.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Norhayati Zakaria

Cross‐cultural training is fast becoming a recognizably important component in the world of international business. This paper discusses the effectiveness of…

Abstract

Cross‐cultural training is fast becoming a recognizably important component in the world of international business. This paper discusses the effectiveness of cross‐cultural training in facilitating the process of acculturation, and in developing the culture‐specific and culture‐general skills needed to increase the sociocultural and psychological adjustments of sojourners and expatriates when they encounter a foreign culture. A new cross‐cultural training model is created by integrating acculturation and training effectiveness models. This new model suggests that providing two different types of training program prior to cultural contact will help recipients to effectively modify existing culture‐general and culture‐specific skills. As a consequence, they will achieve a higher degree of sociocultural and psychological adjustment. Experiential training should trigger affective and behavioral responses, which are the basis of intercultural effectiveness skills, and thus enhance psychological adjustment. By contrast, cognitive training should trigger cognitive responses, especially cultural awareness and interpersonal skills, and enhance sociocultural adjustment.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Oladele Akin‐Ogundeji

Evaluation is increasingly being regarded as a powerful tool toenhance the effectiveness of training. Three major approaches totraining evaluation: quality ascription…

Abstract

Evaluation is increasingly being regarded as a powerful tool to enhance the effectiveness of training. Three major approaches to training evaluation: quality ascription, quality assessment and quality control are highlighted. In order to enhance the effectiveness of training, evaluation should be integrated with organisational life. To ensure this, a model, “the quality assurance evaluation model”, is proposed. A description of an action‐researchoriented exploration of the model with 43 training co‐ordinators of manufacturing firms in Nigeria is given. Changes in the model, suggested by the research findings, are discussed, and the modified model presented. The need to test the modified model on reallife training programmes is emphasised.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Miran Song

The purpose of this paper is to explore what key competencies and characteristics of teachers are needed for integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what key competencies and characteristics of teachers are needed for integrated Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) teaching and to investigate teachers’ perceptions on how important those competencies are and how often they are executed.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory sequential mixed methods approach was used to investigate key characteristics of integrated STEM teaching competencies and the level of their importance and performance as perceived by teachers. By using behavioral event interview technique, qualitative data were collected from professional secondary teachers in science, math and technology subjects. An instrument was constructed based on the result of qualitative research; and a survey was conducted with 48 STEM teachers working in South Korea. The mean values between importance and performance of integrated STEM teaching competencies were compared. A perceived importance level of each item was compared with a practice level by using importance-performance analysis.

Findings

As a result of qualitative research, in total 21 items were constructed as detailed characteristics of each domain of integrated STEM teaching competencies, which provide insights about teachers’ perceptions of teaching competencies that are critical for integrated STEM education. A comparison of means between importance and performance of integrated STEM teaching competencies showed that whereas teachers considered each of these items to be of significant importance in their overall evaluation of the integrated STEM teaching competencies, they are not performing at a level that reflects the assigned importance.

Practical implications

This research results provide information for future research on how to implement an integrated STEM education initiative at the secondary school level, for planning teacher training programs, pre-service teacher education and related educational policies.

Originality/value

South Korea has focused on integrated STEM education to raise talented human resources in the fields of science and technology. However, many teachers have experienced serious difficulties and troubles in executing integrated STEM education. It is necessary to figure out key competencies and characteristics of teachers to facilitate integrated STEM teaching.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Steven J. Agius, Amy Brockbank, Rebecca Baron, Saleem Farook and Jacky Hayden

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of an integrated Medical Leadership Programme (MLP) on a cohort of participating specialty doctors and the NHS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of an integrated Medical Leadership Programme (MLP) on a cohort of participating specialty doctors and the NHS services with which they were engaged.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a qualitative study designed to obtain rich textual data on a novel training intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participating MLP trainees at fixed points throughout the programme in order to capture their experiences. Resulting data were triangulated with data from extant documentation, including trainees’ progress reports and summaries of achievements. Recurring discourses and themes were identified using a framework thematic analysis.

Findings

Evidence of the positive impact upon trainees and NHS services was identified, along with challenges. Evidence of impact across all the domains within the national Medical Leadership Competency Framework was also identified, including demonstrating personal qualities, working with others, managing services, improving services and setting direction.

Research limitations/implications

Data were drawn from interviews with a small population of trainees undertaking a pilot MLP in a single deanery, so there are inevitable limitations for generalisability in the quantitative sense. Whilst the pilot trainees were a self-selected group, it was a group of mixed origin and ability.

Practical implications

The study has provided valuable lessons for the design of future leadership programmes aimed at doctors in training.

Originality/value

Identifying the effectiveness of an innovative model of delivery with regard to the Medical Leadership Curriculum may assist with medical staff engagement and support health service improvements to benefit patient care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Chun-Chi Lan

The perspectives of industry instructors from a case enterprise were adopted to analyze various contexts of internship implementation and to examine feasible strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

The perspectives of industry instructors from a case enterprise were adopted to analyze various contexts of internship implementation and to examine feasible strategies for incorporating internships in the human resource development process.

Design/methodology/approach

A Taiwanese enterprise stationed in China was selected for case study. This study focused on the 2019 summer internship program. Interviews were conducted with 23 industry instructors.

Findings

(1) Units should effectively employ interns by guiding them to learn by doing tasks. (2) Provide training and assign personal industry instructors to guide interns in learning by doing, thereby establishing workplace relationships in advance. (3) High-level leaders and senior managers must pay close attention to internship results and inspire industry instructors and interns to perform internship tasks. (4) Managers of internship units must participate in interviews to select potential employees that satisfy unit requirements. (5) Opportunities for university teachers to interact with enterprises and recommend interested students who learn knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) that fulfill enterprise requirements should be increased.

Practical implications

Enterprises must systematically plan internship tasks, recruitment and selection, as well as practices and reports if they wish to employ interns as potential human resource.

Originality/value

This study used the practical perspectives of industry instructors to establish the contexts and strategies of intern training for human resource development. The results of this study are expected to provide a reference for enterprises in planning internship workplaces and increase their willingness to employ interns.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dean Patton and Susan Marlow

It is agreed that within the UK there is a poor level of investment in formal training and development. This is particularly evident within the small firm sector. The…

Abstract

It is agreed that within the UK there is a poor level of investment in formal training and development. This is particularly evident within the small firm sector. The literature, which considers this issue, concludes that there are a number of reasons why small firm owners are, on the whole, reluctant to invest in such training for themselves and their employees. Such reasons include, ignorance of benefits, time issues, fear that training will enhance employee mobility and, critically, that there is little evidence to indicate that investment in training and development leads to enhanced firm performance. On the basis that there has been some debate and empirical investigation regarding why training does not take place, this paper takes an alternative stance and considers what issues and processes might underpin the decision to invest in training ‐ particularly management training. Findings are drawn from empirical research on a sample of firms where investment had been made in such training in the last 24 months; the indications being that such investment was not strategic or proactive but prompted by problems which threatened business performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 81000