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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Min Zhang, Lin Sun, Fang Qin and G. Alan Wang

In recent years, more and more e-retailers have adopted live streaming services to attract customers. Although the extant literature has mostly examined the motivations…

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1541

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, more and more e-retailers have adopted live streaming services to attract customers. Although the extant literature has mostly examined the motivations for live streaming usage, it remains unclear how to enhance customers’ purchase behaviour. Based on the social exchange theory, in the context of live streaming platforms (LSP), this study aims to investigate the impact of information quality and interaction quality on swift guanxi and customers’ purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an online survey to conduct two rounds of data collection and analyses the data using SPSS and SmartPLS softwares.

Findings

The results show that information quality (believability, usefulness and vividness) and interaction quality (responsiveness, real-time interaction and empathy) are positively related to swift guanxi, which may influence customers’ online purchase intention on LSP.

Originality/value

Prior service quality studies tend to focus on traditional physical stores and e-commerce websites context. This study offers the description of key dimensions of service quality on emerging LSP context. The study also confirms the importance of swift guanxi in an online marketplace.

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Achchuthan Sivapalan and Charles Jebarajakirthy

Enhancing retailing service quality (RSQ) serves as a basic strategy for gaining competitive advantage in the retailing industry and enables retailers to make a loyal…

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2654

Abstract

Purpose

Enhancing retailing service quality (RSQ) serves as a basic strategy for gaining competitive advantage in the retailing industry and enables retailers to make a loyal customer base. The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically investigate a comprehensive mechanism for enhancing customer loyalty to retail stores via service quality practices. This study suggests information on retailers can be the antecedent of the RSQ and its dimensions, thereby proposing a comprehensive mechanism for enhancing customer loyalty to retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using questionnaire surveys from 2,375 customers of three main supermarkets in Sri Lanka. After testing the measurement model, two structural models were run to test hypotheses.

Findings

The findings showed that the RSQ positively influenced customer loyalty. From all the RSQ dimensions, the store’s physical aspects, personal interaction and policy had a significant influence on customer loyalty. The findings also demonstrated that information on retailers contributes to enhancing a customer’s favorable evaluation of the supermarket’s physical aspects, personal interaction and retailing policy.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted with supermarket customers in one country using the cross-sectional data. Hence, the model should be replicated among retail customers in other countries with the longitudinal data.

Practical implications

Practically, this study recommends to retailers which dimensions of service quality they need to focus to enhance customer loyalty to their business. The study furthermore recommends certain dimensions that need to be emphasized while retailers design their promotional and communication programs.

Originality/value

Information on retailers has been suggested as an antecedent for enhancing supermarkets’ service quality practices. Thus, this study proposes a comprehensive mechanism for enhancing customer loyalty to retailers via service quality practices.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Sandra Hogarth‐Scott and Stephen T. Parkinson

Changes in the European retailing marketplace are having an impacton relationships between retailers and their suppliers. Concentration ofsales to fewer, larger and more…

Abstract

Changes in the European retailing marketplace are having an impact on relationships between retailers and their suppliers. Concentration of sales to fewer, larger and more powerful retailers, the growth of own label brands, and the operational and marketing benefits of retailer information technology, all affect the relationship between retailers and their suppliers. These trends are seen at their most extreme in the UK market, which is seen by many as a model for the future of the rest of Europe. In this emerging trading environment, the issues of collaboration versus conflict, documented in research in retailing since the 1950s, take on a particular focus and importance. Looks at these issues from the perspective of 11 manufacturers, each of which deals with the same significant retailer in the UK. Examines the relevance of the constructs of power, conflict and co‐operation in the UK food channel from the supplier′s perspective; the manufacturer′s response to powerful buyers in the channel; and the impact of information technology on channel relationships. Concludes with recommendations to manufacturers on managing key accounts in the new environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Jennifer Rowley

The purpose of this paper is to report on exploratory research that aims to contribute to knowledge on online branding, and the way in which the online channel is being…

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26052

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on exploratory research that aims to contribute to knowledge on online branding, and the way in which the online channel is being used to support brands. The focus of this research is the top multi‐channel UK fashion retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analyses were performed on the web sites of a number of top fashion and clothing retailers, plus three supermarket chains with a strong presence in clothes retailing. An analysis of the extent to which the retailers were using their web site to provide online services and information provided a context for a more detailed analysis of online branding strategies, including communicating brand identity and presence, and building brand relationships.

Findings

Most top “non‐value” fashion retailers offer transactions through their web site, offering extended opportunities for brand engagement and experience. While all fashion retailers achieve consistency of visual identity between the online and other channels, their use of the online channel to communicate brand values, and to promote brand relationships is underdeveloped. There is evidence of some innovative practice, but also scope for considerable further development of the notion of online branding. Research into online and multi‐channel branding has a role to play in supporting this process.

Originality/value

This study makes an important contribution to the under‐researched area of online branding, through a study of the online branding activities of top multi‐channel UK fashion retailers.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Nigel Piercy

One lesson of the 1970s was that the power and influence of retailers and distributors is a highly significant factor in many practical marketing situations. Currently…

Abstract

One lesson of the 1970s was that the power and influence of retailers and distributors is a highly significant factor in many practical marketing situations. Currently, however, the nature of retailer power is in the process of changing as a result of new information technology, which has the effect of increasing dramatically the existing structural advantages of retailers in access to marketing information. This article considers the sources of informational power for retailers, predicts the nature of retailer information strategies and develops a model of the marketing information system which transcends the organisational boundaries of a single firm — the channel marketing information system. The objective of this discussion is to attempt to clarify the possible responses to retailer information advantage, both tactically in the short term, but also rather more importantly at a strategic level in the longer term.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Peter Jones, David Hillier and Daphne Comfort

– The purpose of this paper is to offer an exploratory case study of how the UK’s leading retailers are addressing sustainable consumption.

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1451

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an exploratory case study of how the UK’s leading retailers are addressing sustainable consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a discussion of the growing awareness of the importance of sustainable consumption and of the role that retailers can play in promoting more sustainable patterns of consumption. This is followed by a short literature review of current thinking on sustainable consumption. The paper draws its empirical information from the top ten UK retailers’ corporate websites and from an observational survey conducted in these retailers’ largest stores in the town of Cheltenham in the UK. The paper concludes with some reflections on how the UK’s leading retailers are addressing sustainable consumption and on how the concept fits into their business models.

Findings

The findings reveal that the UK’s top ten retailers make very limited public corporate commitments to sustainable consumption and that while some of these retailers were offering customers some information which might encourage more sustainable shopping behaviour, such information was systematically undermined by marketing messages which were designed to encourage rather than restrict consumption. More critically the paper concludes that the leading retailers’ commitments to sustainable consumption are couched within existing business models centred on continuing growth and that as such they are effectively ignoring the fact that present levels of consumption are not sustainable.

Originality/value

This paper provides an accessible review of the extent to which the UK’s leading food retailers are addressing sustainable consumption and communicating sustainable consumption agendas to their customers within stores, and, as such, it will be of value to academics, practitioners, consumer organizations and policymakers interested in the role retailers can play in promoting sustainable consumption.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Kim Hongyoun Hahn and Jihyun Kim

The purpose of this research is to examine the influences of consumer trust and perceived internet confidence on consumer apparel shopping intention via the online retailer

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15627

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the influences of consumer trust and perceived internet confidence on consumer apparel shopping intention via the online retailer operated by a multi‐channel retailer.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 261 students in a large US Midwestern University participated in the paper‐based survey and provided usable responses. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

Consumer trust in an online retailer was a significant predictor of perceived internet confidence and search intention for product information via the online retailer. Search intention for product information via the online store and perceived internet confidence were significant and strong predictors of consumers' behavioral intention toward the online retailer.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the present study include sampling, which prevents the generalization of the results to all multi‐channel shoppers.

Practical implications

The findings of the study suggest that retailers offer an internet channel as part of a multi‐channel retail strategy and provide consistent service throughout their various channels.

Originality/value

The paper finds that there are significant influences of consumer trust and perceived internet confidence on consumer apparel shopping intention via the online retailer operated by a multi‐channel retailer.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Sanjit Kumar Roy, Vaibhav Shekhar, Ali Quazi and Mohammed Quaddus

The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of service convenience in the relationship between organizational characteristics (such as brand equity, store…

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1077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of service convenience in the relationship between organizational characteristics (such as brand equity, store ambiance, store layout, customer information and employee responsiveness) on customer engagement behaviors (CEBs), including service improvement, customer cooperation, positive word-of-mouth and customer helping customers. It examines two research models, with service convenience as a separate antecedent of CEBs (model A) and as a mediating variable between organizational characteristics and CEBs (model B).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a positivist paradigm, data were collected from 384 respondents representing the existing customers of grocery retailers based in India via a survey instrument. Data were analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) path modeling.

Findings

Results demonstrate service convenience as a motivational driver of CEBs. Results also show that the organizational characteristics significantly influence service convenience which in turn impacts CEBs.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for store managers in effective management of customers' time and effort in terms of saving customers' time and effort as well as motivating customers to elicit their engagement behaviors.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in identifying the impact of organizational characteristics in helping customers to save time and effort in their shopping activities and thereby elicit various types of CEBs. The paper also adds to knowledge by examining the role of service convenience in the nexus between organizational characteristics and CEB types.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Kelly Page‐Thomas, Gloria Moss, David Chelly and Song Yabin

The purpose of this study is to investigate Western and Central European consumers and web retailers with respect to the importance and accessibility of delivery…

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2325

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate Western and Central European consumers and web retailers with respect to the importance and accessibility of delivery information online prior to purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate the importance and accessibility of delivery information online, a survey was conducted of 715 internet consumers from the UK, Hungary and the Czech Republic to explore how important they rate online delivery information. In addition to this, retailing web sites from leading retailers in the UK, Hungary and the Czech Republic were content analysed in order to establish the extent to which they provided online delivery information.

Findings

The research identifies that consumers rate delivery pricing guides, delivery guarantees and delivery schedules as the most important delivery information they expect online prior to purchase. However, content analysis of retailer web sites reveals that many retailers do not adequately provide information about how they “guarantee product delivery”.

Practical implications

It is recommended here that prior to purchase online retailers should make detailed delivery information more accessible to consumers (e.g. pricing guides, timing schedules, etc.) and should consider using delivery service guarantees to assure consumers of delivery service standards and retailer responsibilities.

Originality/value

This paper makes a decisive contribution to e‐shopping behaviour and online retailing by providing insight into why visits to retailing web sites may not be followed up by purchase. This insight results from an examination of an often neglected area of the online buying process, namely “order delivery and fulfilment”. By examining the expectations of e‐consumers across Europe it investigates the role access to delivery information can have in managing customer delivery service expectations and in building trust in online retailers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Oday Kamal, David Brown, Prabhu Sivabalan and Heidi Sundin

– The purpose of this research is to understand how accounting information mobilises stakeholder salience at an industry level.

Downloads
1006

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand how accounting information mobilises stakeholder salience at an industry level.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study method using an explanation building approach was applied to gather information surrounding dairy industry stakeholder uses of accounting information to communicate their salience, in the historical context, leading to, and the events surrounding the milk price “war” in Australia. The Mitchell et al. (1997) stakeholder salience framework was used to advance our understanding of the different ways accounting can be mobilized by stakeholders with different types of salience attributes, at an industry level.

Findings

This empirical analysis produces two insights into the relation between accounting and stakeholder salience. First, there is evidence as to how accounting information impacted on stakeholder salience at an industry level by demonstrating how accounting information (in)directly communicated and justified the increase of a stakeholder’s level of salience. Second, the Mitchell et al. (1997) model is extended by attributing levels of importance to each stakeholder attribute. It was found that, in this setting, power was the most salient attribute of the three, usurping legitimacy and urgency, leading to the outcomes observed.

Research limitations/implications

This paper acknowledged the usual method limitations related to this style of qualitative research, including investigator bias and lack of statistical generalization. In addition, a second set of limitations critiques the paper’s operating framework. While the Mitchell et al. (1997) stakeholder salience model proved to be a suitable choice for this research, it is limited in the way in which stakeholder attributes are presented and used to identify stakeholders. In addition, further light may be provided on the distinctions between the different magnitudes of power, legitimacy and urgency between stakeholders after suggesting that they are not equally weighted.

Practical implications

The milk price “war” remains a high-profile discussion amongst the general public. This research contributes to a better understanding of how different players (stakeholders) have their salience claims mobilized through accounting information. Practitioners in the dairy industry might reflect on the findings to enhance their legitimacy pursuits in future negotiations with their counter-parties, and better deploy accounting to achieve the same.

Social implications

The findings speak more broadly to notions of social equity in stakeholder relations, for the production and distribution of a product that is ubiquitously used in society (dairy – milk). The findings from this study therefore have potential to assist policymakers better understand the strategies adopted by stakeholders to impose their influence and defend their claims in a public forum, using accounting information.

Originality/value

The authors contend that the article provides evidence at an industry level, that is lacking in extant management accounting research (Collier, 2000). To this extent, an original contribution is claimed. The paper is also valuable to management accounting and management researchers studying stakeholder salience, and is one of the first to investigate this issue at an industry level, as well as express how accounting mobilises this salience.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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