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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Luh Gede Sri Artini and Ni Luh Putu Sri Sandhi

The purpose of this study is to determine and compare the performance of small and medium enterprises (SME) and manufacturing company stock portfolios in the Indonesian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine and compare the performance of small and medium enterprises (SME) and manufacturing company stock portfolios in the Indonesian, Chinese and Indian capital markets by the Sharpe Index and the significance of differences in average performance in the capital market.

Design/methodology/approach

This is comparative research that compared the performances of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Indonesian, Chinese and Indian capital markets. The hypothesis examination of comparative test used one-way ANOVA technique on the performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Indonesian, Chinese and Indian capital markets. One-way ANOVA test was used in the analysis to test the average difference of performance indices of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios is in Indonesian, Chinese and Indian capital markets.

Findings

The performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Indonesian capital market was not better than the performances of IHSG and LQ45 Index, the performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Chinese capital market (SZSE) was better than the performance of Shenzhen Composite Index and the performance of Shenzhen A-Share Stock Price Index. The comparison of the performances of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Indonesian, Chinese and Indian capital markets showed that the performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Chinese capital market was the best and the performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Indonesian capital market was the lowest.

Practical implications

The implication of this study was that SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios had relatively better performances in China and India, so investors should consider investing in SME and manufacturing company stocks. The performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolios in Indonesia was not able to exceed market and LQ45 portfolios, so the authority in Indonesia financial market should consider developing a special market for SME and manufacturing company to support the development of SME and manufacturing company in Indonesia and solve the problem of lack of funding source for SME and manufacturing company.

Originality/value

The originality of the present study is in the measurement of the performance of SME and manufacturing company stock portfolio by risk-adjusted return which returns per risk unit measured by Sharpe Index as a more beneficial measurement in measuring stock portfolio performance than average return. Comparative study of the stock portfolio performances of small medium enterprises and manufacturing company In Indonesian, Chinese and Indian stock markets, and object studies conducted in Indonesia, China and India.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Supriya Maheshwari and Raj Singh Dhankar

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the profitability of momentum strategies in the Indian stock market. This study further evaluates whether the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the profitability of momentum strategies in the Indian stock market. This study further evaluates whether the momentum effect is a manifestation of size, value or an illiquidity effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Monthly stock return data of 470 BSE listed stocks over the sample period from January 1997 to March 2013 were used to create extreme portfolios (winner and loser). The returns of extreme portfolios were evaluated using t-statistics and a risk-adjusted measure. Further checks were imposed by controlling for other potential sources of risk including size, value and illiquidity.

Findings

The study provides support in favor of momentum profitability in the Indian stock market. In contrast to the literature, momentum profitability is driven by winning stocks, and hence, buying past winning stocks generates higher returns than shorting loosing stocks in the Indian stock market. Strong momentum profits were observed even after controlling for size, value and trading volume of stocks. This suggests that the momentum effect in the Indian stock market is not a manifestation of small size effect, value effect or an illiquidity effect.

Practical implications

From the practitioner’s perspective, the study indicates that a momentum-based investment strategy in the short run is still persistent and can generate potential profits in the Indian stock market.

Originality/value

There is little empirical evidence on the momentum profitability, especially in the Indian stock market. The study contributes toward the literature by analyzing the momentum profitability even after controlling for size, value and an illiquidity effect. Some aspects of the momentum effect were observed to be dissimilar from those observed in literature for the USA and other countries. Such findings justify the need for testing the momentum profitability in stock markets other than the USA.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

N. Rajiv Menon, M.V. Subha and S. Sagaran

One of the anxieties of stock market investors is whether the markets operate efficiently, independently and with sound fundamentals. This concern is also held by…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the anxieties of stock market investors is whether the markets operate efficiently, independently and with sound fundamentals. This concern is also held by academics and practitioners for quite some time. However, real market situation tends to exhibit a link as is evident from recent market movements across the world. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the stock markets in the Indian subcontinent have any link with the major stock markets from China, Singapore, America, and Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses Engle Granger test of cointegration.

Findings

The paper finds that the Indian markets are related to some of the markets around the world.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into the cointegration of Indian stock markets with other leading stock markets.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Nikhil Yadav, Priyanka Tandon, Ravindra Tripathi and Rajesh Kumar Shastri

The purpose of the study is to investigate the long-run and short-run dynamic relationship between crude oil prices and the movement of Sensex for the period of 2000–2018.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the long-run and short-run dynamic relationship between crude oil prices and the movement of Sensex for the period of 2000–2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the augmented Dickey–Fuller test for the presence of unit root, Johansen cointegration test for estimating the cointegration among the variables. Further, in the case of no cointegration found, the study employed the vector autoregression (VAR) model to estimate the long-run relationship and the Granger causality/Wald test for short-run relationship. The study also conducted tests for the prerequisites of the model: serial correlation, heteroskedasticity and normality of data.

Findings

The study found that both the variables, crude oil prices and Sensex are integrated of order 1, that is, I (1), and there is no cointegration between them. Further, the results proliferated from the VAR model unfold the marked effect of previous month crude oil prices (lag 1) on the movement of Indian stock market represented by Sensex considered as the benchmark index. Furthermore, VAR–Granger causality/block exogeneity Wald tests results indicated that there is a causal relationship between the crude oil prices and Sensex under the VAR environment. The model does not have any serial correlation and heteroskedasticity indicating toward the unbiased and robust estimates.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted till the year 2018, and data for the present period (post-2018) is excluded due to ongoing trade issues between the USA and oil-exporting countries such as Iran. The current COVID-19 outbreak has also put serious issues. Due to limited time and availability of standardized data, researchers have considered Sensex as equity index only, but for more generalized research outcome few other equity indexes could have been taken for study.

Originality/value

The study is completely original in nature and is an extensive study of the relationship between the crude oil price and Indian stock market with reference to causality between the variables.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Shegorika Rajwani and Jaydeep Mukherjee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkages between Indian stock markets with other Asian stock markets namely, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkages between Indian stock markets with other Asian stock markets namely, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan and China. Such a study is particularly important because if the level of integration among the markets is high, then investing in different markets will not generate long term gains from portfolio diversification or reduction in risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies unit root test in the presence of endogenous structural breaks that uses a Lagrange Multiplier (LM) test statistics and the Gregory and Hansen cointegration technique that allows for endogenous determined structural break in the relationship have been applied.

Findings

The results suggest that the Indian stock markets are not integrated with any of the Asian markets either individually or collectively, and conclude that Indian markets are not sensitive to the dynamics in these markets in the long run.

Originality/value

Since the level of integration has been studied keeping in mind the different economical phases like recession and boom, the study has incorporated the possibility of existence of structural breaks in the individual stock return series as well as in their relationship. The lack of evidence on interlinkage of Indian stock markets with other Asian markets suggests that the trend of Indian markets is not in sync with other markets, possibly due to difference in macroeconomic structure. Since the level of integration has been studied keeping in mind the different economical phases like recession and boom, the study has incorporated the possibility of existence of structural breaks in the individual stock return series as well as in their relationship. The lack of evidence on interlinkage of Indian stock markets with other Asian markets suggest that the trend of Indian markets is not in sync with other markets, possibly due to difference in macroeconomic structure.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Priyanka Jain, Vishal Vyas and Ankur Roy

This paper aims to study the weak form of efficiency of Indian capital market during the period of global financial crisis in the form of random walk.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the weak form of efficiency of Indian capital market during the period of global financial crisis in the form of random walk.

Design/methodology/approach

The study considered daily closing prices of S&P CNX Nifty, BSE, CNX100, S&P CNX 500 from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2010. The data source is the equity market segment of NSE and BSE. Both parametric and nonparametric tests (“ex‐posts” in nature) are applied for the purpose of testing weak‐form efficiency. The parametric tests include Augmented Dickey‐Fuller (ADF) unit root tests and nonparametric tests include Phillips‐Perron (PP) unit root tests and Run test. ADF tests use a parametric autoregressive structure to capture serial correlation and PP tests use non‐parametric corrections based on estimates of the long‐run variance of ΔYt.

Findings

The results suggested that the Indian stock market was efficient in its weak form during the period of recession. It means that investors should not be able to consistently earn abnormal gains by analysing the historical prices. Hence one should not be able to make a profit from using something that everybody else knows.

Practical implications

The study reports that all the stocks in these selected indices are fundamentally strong and their prices are not influenced largely by historical prices and other relevant factors which came from industry and any other information that is publically available. Thus it can be concluded that the Indian stock market was informationally efficient and no investor can usurp any privileged information to make abnormal profits.

Originality/value

Where past studies have examined the weak‐form of efficiency of various markets and the effect of globalisation and global financial crisis on the various sectors of developing and emerging economies, this paper attempts to study the weak form of efficiency of the Indian capital market in the period of recession in the form of random walk.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Sanjay Kumar, Jiangxia Liu and Jess Scutella

Supply chain structure, characteristics, and applicable policies differ between developing and developed countries. While most supply chain management research is directed…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain structure, characteristics, and applicable policies differ between developing and developed countries. While most supply chain management research is directed toward supply chains in developed countries, the authors wish to explore the financial impact of disruptions on supply chains in a developing country. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of effective supply chain management practices that could help avoid or mitigate disruptions in Indian companies. The authors study the stock market impact of supply chain disruptions in Indian companies. The authors also aim to understand the difference in financial implications from disruptions between companies in India and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Event study methodology is applied on supply chain disruptions data from Indian companies. The data are compiled from public news release in Indian press. A data set of 301 disruptions for a ten-year period from 2003-2012 is analyzed. Stock valuation of a company is used to assess the financial impact.

Findings

The results show that Indian companies on average lose −2.88 percent of shareholder wealth in an 11-day window covering the event day and five days pre- and post-disruption announcement. A significant stock decline was observed as early as three days prior to announcement, indicating possibility of insider trading and information differentials between investors. Irrespective of the location and responsibility of a disruption, companies experience significant negative returns. Company size, book-to-market ratio, and debt-to-equity ratio were found to be insignificant in affecting the stock market reactions to disruptions. The authors also compiled supply chain disruptions data for US companies. When compared to the US companies, Indian companies register a significantly higher stock decline in the event of a disruption.

Research limitations/implications

Supply chain disruptions data from India and the USA are analyzed. Broad applicability of results across countries may require studying other developing countries. The research demonstrates potential effectiveness of investment in supply chain management initiatives. It also motivates research focussed specifically on supply chains in developing countries.

Practical implications

Supply chain decision makers in India could benefit from investment in disruptions management and mitigation practices. The results provide a valuation of effective supply chain management. The findings provide guidance for investors in making decisions when supply chains face disruptions.

Originality/value

The paper studies the financial consequences of supply chain disruptions in a developing country. The study is valuable because of increasing globalization, outsourcing, and the economic role of developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Abhijeet Chandra

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direction of causality between foreign institutional investment (FII) trading volume and stock market returns in the Indian

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direction of causality between foreign institutional investment (FII) trading volume and stock market returns in the Indian context. There is evidence of uni‐directional causalities from stock returns to FII flows across various sample periods. The paper attempts to establish whether net FII trading volume causes variations in stock market returns or vice versa.

Design/methodology/approach

Using daily data on three different measures of FII trading volume as proxy for FII trading behaviour and S&P CNX Nifty returns, Granger‐causality approach is applied to investigate the bi‐directional causality between net FII trades and returns.

Findings

Bi‐directional causality between net FII investment and Indian stock market return is observed. In general, the FIIs seem to be chasing the Indian stock market returns. It is found that FII trading behaviour resulting in heavy trading volumes may cause variations in stock market returns only in the very short‐term, but afterwards, it is the stock market returns which cause changes in FII trading behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Since foreign equity investors monitor the movement of stock prices, and furthermore, the role of FIIs' exerting impact on Indian stock markets tends to be growing, the authorities will have to develop an environment where FIIs would maintain their positions with confidence, thereby making the markets, as well as investments, more stable. This research considered only stock market returns to test its relationship with three measures of FII trading volume; more macroeconomic as well as microeconomic variables may further be considered for the purpose.

Originality/value

The paper contributes some empirical evidence using three different measures of FII trading volume as proxy of FII trading behaviour, and its bi‐directional relationship with Indian stock market returns.

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Sunaina Kanojia, Deepti Singh and Ashutosh Goswami

Herd behavior has been studied herein and tested based on primary respondents from Indian markets.

Abstract

Purpose

Herd behavior has been studied herein and tested based on primary respondents from Indian markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper expounds the empirical evidence by applying the cross-sectional absolute deviation method and reporting on herd behavior among decision-makers who are engaged in trading in the Indian stock market. Further, the study attempts to analyze the market-wide herding in the Indian stock market using 2230 daily, 470 weekly and 108 monthly observations of Nifty 50 stock returns for a period of nine years from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2018 during the normal market conditions, extreme market conditions and in both increasing and decreasing market conditions.

Findings

In a span of a decade witnessing different market cycles, the authors’ results exhibit that there is no evidence of herding in any market condition in Indian stock market primarily due to the dominance of institutional investors and secondly because of low market participation by individual investors.

Originality/value

The results reveal that there is no impact of herd behavior on the stock returns in the Indian equity market during the normal market conditions. It highlights that the participation of individuals who are more prone to herding is more evident for short-run investments, contrary to long-term holdings.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Ranjan Dasgupta and Sandip Chattopadhyay

The determinants of investors’ sentiment based on secondary stock market proxies in many empirical studies are reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study…

Abstract

Purpose

The determinants of investors’ sentiment based on secondary stock market proxies in many empirical studies are reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study undertakes investor sentiment drivers developed from primary survey measures by constructing an investor sentiment index (ISI) in relation to market drivers to date. This study aims to fill this research gap by first developing the ISI for the Indian retail investors and then examining which of the stock market drivers impacts such sentiment.

Design/methodology/approach

The ISI is constructed using the mean scores of eight statements as formulated based on popular direct investor sentiment surveys undertaken across the world. Then, we use the multiple regression approach overall and for top 33.33% (high-sentiment) and bottom 33.33% (low-sentiment) investors based on the responses of 576 respondents on 18 statements (proxying eight study hypotheses) collected in 2016. Moreover, the demography-based classification based investors’ sentiment is examined to make our results more robust and in-depth.

Findings

On an overall basis, the IPO activities/issues and information certainty, trading volume and momentum and institutional investors’ investment activities market drivers significantly and positively impact retail investors is examined. However, only IPO activities/issues and information certainty influences both high- and low-sentiment investors. It is intriguing to report that nature of the stock markets show conflicting results for high- (negative significant) and low- (positive significant) sentiment investors.

Originality/value

The construction of the ISI from primary survey measure is for the first time in Indian context in relation to investigating the stock market drivers influential to retail investors’ sentiment. In addition, hypothesized market drivers are also unique, each representing different fundamental and technical characteristics associated with the Indian market.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

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