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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Frederikke Jarlby, Ilse Derluyn, Kathrine Vitus and Signe Smith Jervelund

Poor mental health is common amongst unaccompanied refugee adolescents and may have serious negative consequences for their successful settlement. This study aims to elucidate…

Abstract

Purpose

Poor mental health is common amongst unaccompanied refugee adolescents and may have serious negative consequences for their successful settlement. This study aims to elucidate unaccompanied adolescents’ experiences of psychosocial challenges and what they need to cope with this during their course of settlement in Denmark, particularly focussing on social support.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample included six male unaccompanied refugee adolescents aged 17–18, living in two residential care facilities. Based on a triangulation of methods (i.e. participant observation, individual interviews and a focus group interview using photo-elicitation), a thematic analysis was conducted within the conceptual framework of stigma and a need for relatedness.

Findings

Several interwoven and on-going psychosocial challenges, including perceived stigma and loneliness combined with past traumatic experiences and uncertainties about the future, were experienced by the adolescents in this study. As opposed to experiencing emotional distress, stigma and loneliness, various activities of “forgetting”, which involved a sense of momentary relief or bliss, a sense of “normalcy” and acceptance and/or a sense of relatedness, helped them to cope.

Practical implications

For psychosocial care services to respond to adolescents’ mental health needs in an optimal way, the results suggest that activities and social support that are sufficiently adapted to individual needs should be the focal point in their daily lives.

Originality/value

The study offers insights into the needs of unaccompanied refugee adolescents in coping with the psychosocial challenges experienced in their daily lives.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2023

Sarah Adeyinka, Ine Lietaert and Ilse Derluyn

This paper aims to explore the role of family members in human trafficking and how their roles impact and are perceived by their children and wards.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of family members in human trafficking and how their roles impact and are perceived by their children and wards.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses data collected through a longitudinal, cross-country study. The study was conducted among 31 female, Nigerian victims of trafficking in Italy.

Findings

The authors argue that family members play important, howbeit diverse roles across space and time, in the different stages of the trafficking process, echoing a relational approach of their geographies.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the under-researched role of how family members may (wilfully or unknowingly) facilitate and aid the trafficking of their dependents and the consequences of their involvement on their children and wards.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Griet Roets, Paul Smeyers, Michel Vandenbroeck, Maria De Bie, Ilse Derluyn, Rudi Roose, Bruno Vanobbergen, Lieve Bradt and Angelo Van Gorp

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on how Eric Broekaert perceived “Ortho-pedagogy” as an academic discipline.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on how Eric Broekaert perceived “Ortho-pedagogy” as an academic discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors try to get a grasp on Broekaert’s point of view while cross-reading three central articles in which he explains his integrated and holistic paradigm of education.

Findings

One could argue that, while claiming that the different epistemological, ontological and methodological approaches underlying Eric Broekaert’s paradigm of holistic education are not easily integrated, the potential paradoxes he produced in this claim also enabled a “choc des idées” and challenged and enlightened a wide diversity of researchers and practitioners in taking a partial, locatable, critical, reflexive and temporary stance in educational praxis (Lather, 1991).

Originality/value

The authors discuss how Broekaert, as a companion in life, enabled them to cautiously embrace tensions, paradoxes and complexities in the development of an educational praxis.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

David Kalema, Lore Van Damme, Sofie Vindevogel, Ilse Derluyn, Peter Baguma and Wouter Vanderplasschen

Given the scarce literature on alcohol use disorders (AUD) and their treatment in developing countries, this paper aims to explore motivation levels and their correlates among…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the scarce literature on alcohol use disorders (AUD) and their treatment in developing countries, this paper aims to explore motivation levels and their correlates among alcohol service users in two residential treatment centres in Kampala, Uganda. This study how motivation levels of Ugandan alcohol service users compare with those from American studies; and the specific factors affecting internal and external motivation in the Ugandan context.

Design/methodology/approach

The motivation for treatment was measured among 100 individuals entering AUD treatment using the Texas Christian University (TCU) Treatment needs and Motivation scale. The WHOQoL–BREF, Addiction Severity Index–6 and Hopkins Symptoms Check List–37 were used to measure addiction severity, quality of life (QoL) and psychopathology, respectively. Correlates of motivation were identified using linear regression analyses.

Findings

Ugandan service users demonstrated low treatment motivation in the treatment needs a domain. While addiction severity (recent heavy alcohol use) and participating in private treatment were associated with higher internal and external motivation, deterioration in physical and environmental QoL, depressive symptoms and lower education were linked with higher internal motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Different elements affect domains of treatment motivation, requiring attention for clients’ unique needs as influenced by their background, addiction severity, QoL, psychological needs and contextual factors (e.g. treatment setting). Further studies are needed to explore additional correlates of motivation for treatment among alcohol service users in Uganda and to assess the longitudinal impact of motivation on treatment outcomes.

Originality/value

Although motivation has been extensively studied, clinicians are challenged in understanding and explaining motivational dynamics given the multiplicity of factors influencing change-related decisions and behaviours and the diversity in substance-using populations. This need is even bigger in non-Western societies as cultural differences may require differential therapeutic management. This is one of the first studies measuring motivation for AUD treatment in a low-income country and offers insight for understanding motivation dynamics in similar settings.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Sophie Samyn, Sarah Adeyinka, Sami Zemni and Ilse Derluyn

This study aims to explore and discuss the ethical challenges that the authors encountered in the SWIPSER project, a study about the well-being of West-African women who work in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore and discuss the ethical challenges that the authors encountered in the SWIPSER project, a study about the well-being of West-African women who work in the red-light district in Brussels.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was commissioned by the municipality of Schaerbeek and executed by a Nigerian–Belgian research team. Data were collected using a multi-method qualitative approach, predominantly through ethnographic fieldwork that consisted of detailed observations, informal interviews (with 38 participants), complemented by document analysis and stakeholder interviews.

Findings

The study presents the main ethical dilemmas in four themes: (1) representing diversity, i.e. how do we get access to all members of a migrant community that is inherently hierarchical?; (2) in the margin, i.e. how can we conduct research with undocumented migrants and what do we do when faced with violence and injustice?; (3) attraction and repulsion, i.e. what ethical consequences are involved when working in a multi-ethnic research team?; and (4) unveiling secrets, i.e. which ethical challenges are we faced with when presenting the results of research on vulnerable migrant communities?

Originality/value

This study goes beyond procedural research ethics and highlights the specific relational ethics (related to the relation between research(er) and participant) and the socio-political ethics (related to the relation between the research(er) and the socio-political context) involved in qualitative research with female migrants who work in prostitution.

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Sarah Curtis and Anne‐Cecile Hoyez

This review arises from a series of multidisciplinary Franco‐British workshops which were supported by a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Agence…

Abstract

This review arises from a series of multidisciplinary Franco‐British workshops which were supported by a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR). More than 30 participants from a range of institutions and agencies were involved in compiling the material in this review (Appendix I). The workshops offered an opportunity to exchange ideas from research on the relationships between migration, health and well‐being in Britain and France. In the following discussion we compare and contrast experiences in the two countries, with the aim of assessing the importance of international, national and local contexts, in their various cultural, social and political dimensions, for the relationships of interest. Drawing on these ideas, we suggest the definition of a future international research agenda.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Ricard Zapata-Barrero and Evren Yalaz

104

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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