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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Yi-Ping Shih, Wen-Hsu Lin and Chin-Chun Yi

This chapter aims to delineate the indigenous pattern of parental involvement in Taiwan by investigating the effects of specific practices in schools and in the family

Abstract

This chapter aims to delineate the indigenous pattern of parental involvement in Taiwan by investigating the effects of specific practices in schools and in the family, such as school selection, school involvement, preparing a study place at home, and providing nutritious food.

We use two waves of data from the Taiwan Youth Project (2000, 2003) to examine how parental involvement varies between dual- and single-earner families, and we further demonstrate how sons and daughters have different access in terms of recognizing their parents’ effort, and how children’s subjective appraisals promote their academic performance with respect to test scores.

We find that dual-earner families have higher incomes, higher educational levels, and have fewer children than single-earner ones. Our multivariate analyses show that parental involvement does increase youngsters’ Basic Competence Test (BCT) score. However, we are unable to find any direct or indirect effects from parental employment status on BCT scores. Further analysis indicates that the relationship between parental school involvement and BCT score is only significant among dual-earner families, but not for the single-earner ones. In addition, our multiple group analysis reveals that sons’ BCT scores are affected more by parents’ school involvement, whereas daughters’ are affected more by special home provision. Our findings from adolescents’ subjective responses imply that sons may be more responsive to a non-familial context in contrast with daughters, who react more positively to familial provision.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Zonghui Li and Douglas Johansen

Drawing on the resource-based view, this study aims to examine how family involvement in migrant-founded small businesses gives rise to distinctive resources that help…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the resource-based view, this study aims to examine how family involvement in migrant-founded small businesses gives rise to distinctive resources that help these businesses survive.

Design/methodology/approach

Using microdata from the 2007 US survey of business owners (SBO), this study uses logit regression modeling to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Results show that small businesses founded by migrant entrepreneurs are less likely to survive and that family involvement weakens the negative relationship between founder migrant status and business survivability. In addition, the positive moderating effect associated with family involvement is further strengthened by the use of external/borrowing startup capital, thus migrant families founded small businesses with access to external capital have the highest probability of survival.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on both migrant entrepreneurship and family business. This paper finds family involvement in the business, interacting with the founder’s migrant status, tends to create distinctive resource endowments that help to compensate for the resource constraints associated with migrant entrepreneurs. Such resource endowments may take the form of high levels of solidarity among migrant family members and the spanning role of the migrant kinship networks extended from the country of origin to the country of residence.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Anna Frances Carmon and Judy C. Pearson

The purpose of this paper is to examine how family member employees’ communicative experiences within their families affect their perceptions of the workplace. The…

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1883

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how family member employees’ communicative experiences within their families affect their perceptions of the workplace. The influence of family business employees’ perceptions of family communication patterns on family satisfaction, family involvement, and work involvement within their family businesses were explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 138 family business employees, representing 81 family businesses, were surveyed. The questionnaire contained measures of family communication patterns, family involvement, work involvement, family satisfaction, as well as several demographic questions. Path modeling was used to analyze two proposed models of family involvement and work involvement.

Findings

Conversation orientation was related to perceptions of family satisfaction and perceptions of family satisfaction were related to perceptions of family involvement. While both proposed models were consistent with the data, no significant relationships were found between conformity orientation and perceptions of family satisfaction and between perceptions of family satisfaction and work involvement.

Originality/value

While not only exploring family business employees’ experiences through a unique communicative lens, this study also provides several practical implications for family business owners and managers.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2018

Vas Taras, Esra Memili, Zhonghui Wang and Henrik Harms

This study aims to investigate the effects of family involvement in corporations on firm performance. It remains unclear whether family-owned companies, or companies with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of family involvement in corporations on firm performance. It remains unclear whether family-owned companies, or companies with other forms of family involvement in the corporate governance, perform better than firms with no family involvement. Furthermore, the study focuses on family involvement in publicly traded firms, which are different from private family firms. Hence, knowledge about family firms will be enriched through a closer look at the publicly traded family firms and shed further light onto the heterogeneity among family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses a meta-analysis of the extant research on family involvement and publicly traded family firm performance. The authors synthesize past research, identify and reconcile mixed findings and expand the understanding of the phenomenon.

Findings

Involvement of the founding family members in firm governance tends to improve firm performance, albeit the effect is rather weak. However, the effect varies greatly depending on the type of family involvement and the measure of performance. The authors also identify regional differences, as well as variations by the firm size and study design. Furthermore, under-researched areas are identified for future research.

Practical implications

The results of the study would be useful in guiding organizational design and investment decisions.

Originality/value

By using the meta-analytic approach, the present study provides a comprehensive review of the empirical evidence available on the issue so far. Most importantly, the authors were able to conduct a series of tests to assess the moderating effects of a number of factors that could not be evaluated in any individual study in the meta-analytic database.

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Rawa Alwadani and Nelson Oly Ndubisi

Family centered non-economic (FCNE) goals, such as environmental and social goals, are sometimes strenuous to “sell” to non-family members in a family business, and are…

Abstract

Purpose

Family centered non-economic (FCNE) goals, such as environmental and social goals, are sometimes strenuous to “sell” to non-family members in a family business, and are often open to resistance. The purpose of this paper is to identify socio-psychological mechanisms for achieving FCNE goals because, in addition to economic goals, they are the other two components of the triple bottom line.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a juxtaposition of the literature on family businesses, and the theories of mindfulness and psychological ownership, this paper argues for the facilitating roles of family involvement and mindful organizing in the achievement of FCNE goals. An example of how a Kuwaiti oil company implements these ideas is appended.

Findings

A moderated link between family involvement, mindful organizing and FCNE goal of environmental sustainability. Besides its direct effect on environmental sustainability, mindful organizing also has a potential mediating role in the relationship between family involvement and environmental sustainability. Psychological ownership, environmental sensitivity and individual mindfulness will moderate the relationship between mindful organizing and the achievement of environmental sustainability goals.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents ten propositions and argues that three types of family involvement (ownership, management and inter-generational), together with non-family engagement (through mindful organizing) would lead to success in achieving the FCNE goal of environmental sustainability. Psychological ownership, environmental sensitivity and individual mindfulness are potential moderators.

Practical implications

The paper suggests some key drivers of FCNE goal of environmental sustainability as well as several contingent factors. Applicable to family businesses, owners and/or managers of similar firms can apply knowledge from this study in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper’s model advances the current understanding of the link between family involvement, mindful organizing, environmental sustainability, psychological ownership, environmental sensitivity and individual mindfulness in the context of family business. The paper further suggests new future research directions.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2014

Tetsushi Fujimoto, Sayaka K. Shinohara and Tsuyoshi Oohira

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression, and the moderating role of spouses’ family and job involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Methodology/approach

We use a matched sample of Japanese employed husbands and wives to examine the relationships between inter-spousal dynamics about work–family conflict and psychological well-being.

Findings

We found that (1) the effect of WFC on depression was larger for wives, (2) husbands’ and wives’ own psychological family involvement did not moderate the relationship between WFC and their depression, and (3) spousal family and job involvement operated as a moderator only for husbands. While WFC reduced husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in their jobs psychologically and behaviorally, WFC increased husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in family at both psychological and behavioral levels.

Practical implications

Employers need to take into account the importance of looking simultaneously at the ways employed husbands and wives work when trying to understand how workplace conditions may be changed to ameliorate psychological well-being for spouses.

Originality/value of chapter

This study suggests that an experience of conflict between work and family is likely to deteriorate the psychological well-being for employed husbands and wives in non-Western contexts like Japan. Furthermore, spousal involvements in family and work domains are likely to play moderating roles in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Details

Family Relationships and Familial Responses to Health Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-015-5

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

María Comino-Jurado, Sonia Sánchez-Andújar and Purificación Parrado-Martínez

This paper examines how differences in the family involvement in a family business can influence its level of indebtedness. Assuming the influence of family is not the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how differences in the family involvement in a family business can influence its level of indebtedness. Assuming the influence of family is not the same for all family firms, we consider each company as a combination of the family involvement in three dimensions of the business: ownership, management and governance structure.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the partial least squares technique allows us to address the heterogeneity of family firms through an integral concept of family involvement in business that jointly considers the level of family participation in the ownership, management and governance structure of each firm.

Findings

Our results demonstrate that the level of family involvement in a family firm, considering the heterogeneity existing within the family business group, directly influences its level of indebtedness. In addition, we find that family involvement in ownership and governance structures individually considered are positively related to the level of indebtedness of the family business.

Originality/value

Our findings prove that some indebtedness patterns, which previous literature has described as common to all Spanish family businesses, may actually be valid only for specific family firms with a particular level of family involvement. In addition, the way of measuring family business heterogeneity through our integral concept of family involvement can be replicated by other authors because of the manageability of the items, thus contributing to an increased understanding of the effects of family involvement in firms' development.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Yu Zhou, Wenwen Zhao and Xueqing Fan

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether, how and when new venture creation progress (NVCP) affects work-to-family conflict (WFC) by introducing coping behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether, how and when new venture creation progress (NVCP) affects work-to-family conflict (WFC) by introducing coping behavior strategies as mediators, entrepreneurs’ prior experience and family involvement in business as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

This study performs multivariate regression analysis based on a sample of 260 nascent entrepreneurs from the Chinese Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics.

Findings

This study reveals that an entrepreneur’s WFC tends to increase along with the growth of the new venture. Specifically, NVCP impels entrepreneurs to adopt reactive role behavior strategy and meet both entrepreneurial and family demands; meanwhile, NVCP propels entrepreneurs to adopt prioritizing entrepreneurship behavior strategy for the increasing work demands, thus leading to more WFC; the mediation effect of prioritizing entrepreneurship behaviors is stronger than that of reactive role behaviors, which leads to an overall positive main effect. Moreover, the preceding mediating paths are moderated by entrepreneurs’ prior experience and family involvement.

Research limitations/implications

First, the authors have investigated how NVCP influenced WFC. However, the authors did not extend the research to the possible effect of WFC on entrepreneurial performance. Second, in the work-family-conflict literature, unmarried and those without children are often excluded since their private life demands differ significantly from parents’ demands. Although the authors control for marital status in the model, the number of children is still left uncontrolled. Furthermore, the authors only used the first two waves of data, leading to a potential selection bias. In addition, the Chinese context may have influenced the generalizability of the results in a complex manner.

Practical implications

This paper indicates that reactive role behavior strategy will decrease WFC, while prioritizing entrepreneurship behavior strategy will increase WFC. Therefore, the authors suggest entrepreneurs adopt more reactive strategy to reduce WFC. Besides, both prior experience and family involvement strengthen the relationship between NVCP and prioritizing entrepreneurship behavior strategy, thereby leading to more WFC. Therefore, entrepreneurs with prior experience and family involvement should pay more attention to their roles in family. Furthermore, entrepreneurs with family involvement can try to segment the entrepreneurship-family boundary psychologically. For example, entrepreneurs can avoid business talking with families but show concerns for them at rest time.

Social implications

WFC has been found negatively related to individual health and well-being. And entrepreneurs experienced even more WFC than employees in established organizations. Therefore, it is of great importance to focus on the topic of reducing entrepreneurs’ WFC. This research indicates that entrepreneurs can experience less WFC by choosing reactive role behavior strategy. Prior experience and family involvement can induce them to be more attached to new venture creation. This research provides practical suggestions and reminders for entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This mediated moderation model elaborates whether, how and when NVCP affects WFC, thereby contributing to the knowledge of entrepreneurship-family interface and enlightening nascent entrepreneurs about balancing their start-up responsibilities with their family life.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Hang Zhu, Pengxiang Zhang, Xiaoyan Han and Ting Huang

The purpose of this paper is to unveil how family involvement in management teams of private Chinese companies affects professional managers’ psychological ownership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to unveil how family involvement in management teams of private Chinese companies affects professional managers’ psychological ownership and sense of “us”, in the hopes of understanding why their devotion cannot coexist with the higher level of commitment of family managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes two main studies. The first uses regression to analyze survey data provided by 165 professional managers working in Chinese private companies. The second is a scenario experiment in which 106 MBA candidates participate.

Findings

The study finds that there is a negative relationship between family management involvement and professional managers’ perceived relationship closeness to owners and psychological ownership of firms. It also finds that relationship closeness fully mediates the negative influence of family management involvement on managers’ psychological ownership.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to both the theoretical literature and management practice. From a theoretical perspective, it connects studies in indigenous sociological psychology with new literature on psychological ownership. The paper finds that personal relationships nurture the shared psychological ownership of managers by generating a sense of “us”, providing a new theoretical explanation for its formation process. Furthermore, this study offers an explanation for the negative signal effect of family involvement in management. From a practical perspective, this study finds that family involvement in management acts as a critical boundary condition for using personal relationships to stimulate professional managers.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Pam Allis and Michael O'Driscoll

The paper seeks to examine whether spillover from “nonwork” to work contributes to individuals' well‐being.

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2940

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine whether spillover from “nonwork” to work contributes to individuals' well‐being.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to New Zealand local government employees. Positive (facilitation) and negative (conflict) spillover from two “nonwork” domains (family and personal benefit activities) to work were investigated. The survey also assessed psychological involvement (in work, family and personal benefit activities), time devoted to each domain, and self‐reported well‐being in each area.

Findings

Levels of nonwork‐to‐work facilitation were moderate, and significantly higher than nonwork‐to‐work conflict, and well‐being was moderately high (although greater for the family and personal benefit domains than for work). There were significant positive relationships between psychological involvement in the nonwork domains and levels of facilitation from these domains to work, and nonwork‐to‐work facilitation was associated with higher well‐being. Time invested in family and personal activities was not linked with greater nonwork‐to‐work conflict. Mediation analyses indicated that psychological involvement (in family and personal activities) was associated with increased facilitation, which in turn enhanced well‐being.

Practical implications

Engagement in family and personal benefit activities yields positive outcomes for individuals, in terms of their psychological well‐being and facilitation of work‐related outcomes. Encouragement to engage in these areas can therefore be beneficial for both individuals and their employing organizations.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research is that involvement in personal benefit activities (as another component of the “nonwork” domain, in addition to family activities) can have positive outcomes for individuals, resulting in facilitation of work outcomes and positive well‐being.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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