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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Rosário Macário, Hilde Meersman and Eddy Van de Voorde

Choosing the right pricing strategy is a complex decision, even though it is fundamental for transport companies whose activities are very diverse and subject to strong…

Abstract

Choosing the right pricing strategy is a complex decision, even though it is fundamental for transport companies whose activities are very diverse and subject to strong stochastic fluctuations. However, in spite of its complexity, adequate pricing can be a very relevant instrument to ensure the competitive position of the company.

European airlines are competing for the same passengers, often with different strategies and, as a consequence, with different financial results at the end of the fiscal year. The use of different pricing strategies is one of the potential explanations. This brings us to the research question of this chapter: How can air pricing strategies be used to support strategic aims, and what are the consequences?

This chapter first deals with the state of the art in air pricing strategies, followed by an analysis of the relationship between airline pricing, yields and profit. The focus then moves to a case study at Brussels Airport over the period 2012–2017. Following the entry of Vueling and Ryanair at Brussels Airport, the incumbent Brussels Airlines launched a very aggressive pricing war against the two newcomers. The result was a partial withdrawal by Vueling and Easyjet and an end to Ryanair’s expansion at Brussels Airport. Even without access to confidential detailed data, one can learn a lot from the reconstruction of the consecutive management decisions by the airlines involved.

Details

Airline Economics in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-282-5

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Laura Temmerman, Carina Veeckman and Pieter Ballon

This paper aims to share the experience of a collaborative platform for social innovation (SI) in urban governance in Brussels (Belgium) and to formulate recommendations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to share the experience of a collaborative platform for social innovation (SI) in urban governance in Brussels (Belgium) and to formulate recommendations for future initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The publicly funded collaborative platform “Brussels by us”, which aimed to improve the quality of life in specific neighbourhoods in Brussels (Belgium), is presented as a case study for SI in urban governance. The case study is detailed according to four dimensions based on the SI and living lab literature.

Findings

While the initiative appeared to be a successful exploration platform for collaborative urban governance, it did not evolve into concrete experimentation nor implementation of the solutions. Possible explanations and recommendations are formulated.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper are based on the experience of a one-year initiative. The results should be completed by similar case studies of longitudinal initiatives, and with other levels of implementation such as experimentation and concrete implementation of solutions.

Originality/value

This paper presents a concrete case study of a collaborative platform implemented in a specific neighbourhood in Brussels (Belgium). Its digital and offline approach can help other practitioners, scholars and public institutions to experiment with the living lab methodology for the co-ideation of solution in urban governance. The four-dimensional framework presented in the study can provide future initiatives with a structured reporting and analysis framework, unifying and strengthening know-how in the domain of SI.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Book part
Publication date: 31 May 2007

Sylvie Gayda and Kari Lautso

Abstract

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Land Use and Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044891-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Patrick De Groote and Myriam Eerlingen

In this article, the authors want to present a general view of the evolution and the actual situation of the hotel business in Brussels by analysing data about supply…

Abstract

In this article, the authors want to present a general view of the evolution and the actual situation of the hotel business in Brussels by analysing data about supply, demand, quality of the hotels, price level and hotel organisation. Furthermore, specific attention is devoted to the hotel crisis, its causes, consequences and possible solutions.

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The Tourist Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Jean De Munck and Isabelle Ferreras

This paper aims to use the Capability Approach in order to shed light on the capability for voice of workers in an industrial restructuring process.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the Capability Approach in order to shed light on the capability for voice of workers in an industrial restructuring process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research relies on conceptual frames and distinctions borrowed from Amartya Sen, Jon Elster and Jürgen Habermas. It is based on an empirical case study: the restructuring of the Brussels plant of the Volkswagen (VW) group in 2006‐2007.

Findings

The central distinction established in the paper is the one between deliberation and bargaining. The structures that characterized social dialogue at the VW plant in Brussels did not totally deprive Belgian workers of capability for voice. But they seriously limited its scope.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical investigation is focused more on trade unions than on internal management relationships.

Social implications

The paper presents an analysis of the real opportunities for deliberation and bargaining that goes beyond the mere formal implementation of social law.

Originality/value

The paper discusses application of the Capability Approach to empirical procedures of collective bargaining in the context of a globalised restructuring process in the automotive sector.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Priscilla Ananian and Bernard Declève

Brussels Capital Region has to deal with urban conflicts arising from the different kinds of land uses. On the one hand the process of metropolisation has intensified the…

Abstract

Brussels Capital Region has to deal with urban conflicts arising from the different kinds of land uses. On the one hand the process of metropolisation has intensified the inner city's land use through residential, economic and urban development and on the other hand this same process has contributed to the expansion and sprawling of the city beyond its administrative borders. The city's main challenge is to ensure the cohabitation of different urban forms and densities in a multi-scale level related to metropolitan and local functions (Ananian P. 2010). Brussels, originally an industrial city, has become an administrative centre, generating a series of disaffected areas. Urban regeneration and sustainable development policies aim to improve the standard of living through urban, social and economic enhancements. Indeed, these policies deal with the construction, renovation and requalification of obsolete areas into new dwelling complexes. In this context, the present article shows the results of a broader research commissioned by the Brussels Capital Region on residential densification between 1989 and 2007(Declève B. Ananian P. et al 2009). Through the analysis of this inventory, we have identified three main techniques concerning the requalification of old places into residential uses: firstly the reurbanisation of brownfields generated by the delocalisation of large facilities; secondly the requalification and reconversion of isolated buildings (abandoned and obsolete industrial and office buildings) and last but not least, the recycling of terrains merged into the urban fabric of old neighbourhoods. Following two methodological approaches (morphological observation and analysis of social perception), this research has shown us that, in the last twenty years of housing production in Brussels, the main abandoned buildings and sites that were available were requalified, increasing density and improving urbanity through the diversity of the urban forms adopted for the public and private spaces.

Details

Open House International, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Mathieu Strale

The purpose of this chapter is first to establish a state of the art about cargo tram, in order to understand its opportunities and constraints. In a second step, the aim…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is first to establish a state of the art about cargo tram, in order to understand its opportunities and constraints. In a second step, the aim is to add an often overlooked spatial dimension in the analysis, which may offer a renewed insight into the issue and extend the understanding of the potential use of urban light rail for freight.

Design/methodology/approach

The first step of the analysis is carried out through a study of the literature. In particular, the potential use of cargo tram for the various urban supply chains is evaluated. The aim is to establish a European state of the art on urban light rail use for freight. Then, to concretise these elements and to add an empirical geographical approach, the Brussels situation is studied in detail.

Findings

This combination of a theoretical analysis and a field approach of the case of Brussels allows us to lead an original study. Obstacles, opportunities and interest for the implementation of cargo trams are specified. In addition, the use of geographical approach gives a new point of view since most of the publications in this field are based on economic or technical approaches.

Practical implications

This study may help public and private actors involved in urban freight matters, as well as public transport companies, to better understand the issues related to cargo trams. In a context where this transport mode is promoted and discussed in a growing number of cities and urban supply chains, it is useful to get an objective synthesis and a prospective analysis on this topic. This research may also have social implications in the way it helps to define a more sustainable urban logistics.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is related to the combination of a theoretical and empirical approach, to the link that is made between urban supply chains and capabilities of cargo trams and finally to the prospective study on the Brussels case. Indeed, because of the novelty of the topic, there are very few studies, either ex-post or ex-ante.

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Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2013

Frédéric Dobruszkes and Moshe Givoni

This chapter provides a critical discussion of air to rail mode substitution. Environmental impacts, intermodal competition and integration are considered, examining…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a critical discussion of air to rail mode substitution. Environmental impacts, intermodal competition and integration are considered, examining advantages and disadvantages as well as opportunities and constraints.

Originality

Both operation and life-cycle analysis perspectives show that high-speed rail (HSR) is much ‘greener’ than air transport (per seat-km or per passenger-km) provided that the former achieves high load factors and the latter lower load factors and that freed runway capacity is not reused. HSR travel time is its main competitive advantage against air transport, and a 600-km flight is arguably the current limit for robust intermodal effects.

Findings

The potential for air–HSR integration at the airport relies on various service, business and technical constraints. Even when it is successful, its environmental benefit appears to be marginal, if not negative, if airport capacity is reused for longer flights. In the current context, such integration appears more like a business opportunity for airlines, airports and train operators rather than a sustainable option. Yet the environmental benefit of integration may be larger within potential integrated transport policies.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Nikolay A. Dentchev, Philippe Eiselein and Thomas Kayaert

Despite the abundant literature on CSR, the implementation of social responsibility in public sector organizations is still underexplored. And this despite the fact that…

Abstract

Despite the abundant literature on CSR, the implementation of social responsibility in public sector organizations is still underexplored. And this despite the fact that, as illustration, the public sector accounts for more than one-third of the economic activity in Belgium. Moreover, public sector organizations have an example function toward other societal actors, and by implementing social responsibility themselves, they are likely to provide a strong signal to the market. In this chapter, we approach the example role of public organizations in CSR implementation by doing a qualitative research of 14 (out of 19) municipalities in Brussels and focus thereby on the implementation of a social responsibility proxy, “Local Agenda 21” (LA21). We find that political support, through key political figures and the opposition, are very important for the success of the implementation of social responsibility in municipalities. We were surprised to learn that municipalities are experiencing competition amongst each other regarding LA21 implementation. However, the most unexpected result of our study was that municipalities reported that their involvement in LA21 seems to have only a limited impact on the private sector. Therefore, the argument of government institutions “leading by example” requires further investigation.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2021

Katherine Whitehouse, Ella Lambe, Sofia Rodriguez, Umberto Pellecchia, Aurelie Ponthieu, Rafael Van den Bergh and Djoen Besselink

Prolonged exposure to daily stressors can have long-term detrimental implications for overall mental health. For asylum seekers in European Union transit or destination…

Abstract

Purpose

Prolonged exposure to daily stressors can have long-term detrimental implications for overall mental health. For asylum seekers in European Union transit or destination countries, navigating life in reception centres can represent a significant burden. The purpose of this study was to explore post-migration stressors during residency in reception centres, and to formulate recommendations for adequate service provision in Belgium.

Design/methodology/approach

Research was conducted in two reception centres in Belgium. A total of 41 in-depth interviews were carried out with asylum seeker residents (n = 29) and staff (n = 12). Purposive recruitment was used for asylum seekers (for variation in length of centre residency and family status) and staff (variation in job profiles). Interviews were conducted in English, French or with a translator in Arabic or Dari. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and manually coded using thematic analysis.

Findings

Asylum seekers face significant constraints with regard to their living conditions, including total absence of privacy, overcrowding and unhygienic conditions. These act as continuous and prolonged exposure to daily stressors. Several barriers to accessing activities or integration opportunities prevent meaningful occupation, contribute towards eroded autonomy and isolation of asylum seeker residents. Inadequate capacity and resources for the provision of psychosocial support in reception centres leads to a sense of abandonment and worthlessness.

Originality/value

Analysis indicates that structural and practical challenges to adequately support asylum seekers are rooted in policy failures necessary for appropriate resourcing and prioritization of preventative measures. Such deliberate decisions contribute towards state deterrence strategies, eroding both individual well-being and manufacturing a crisis in the systems of support for asylum seekers.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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