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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Ian Fillis, Boram Lee and Ian Fraser

The authors consider the role of institutional relationships in providing an exhibition as a launching platform for emerging artists to develop their careers, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors consider the role of institutional relationships in providing an exhibition as a launching platform for emerging artists to develop their careers, as well as contributing to the broader creative economy. The authors view this as an entrepreneurial intervention in challenging the status quo through its potential to stimulate artist career development.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a case study approach in order to understand the complex inter-relationships between stakeholders of an emerging artists' exhibition at a well-known art institution. A total of 26 interviews were held with a selection of the exhibiting artists, artists from previous years' exhibitions, institution staff, the exhibition selection panel and major prize givers.

Findings

The main relationship value created by the institution as perceived by the exhibiting artists was high-level publicity and exposure of their work. Related benefits such as the potential to build career-enhancing networks were also emphasised. Some of the artists interviewed were aware of the art market structure and how they could create and sustain value within it. Others expressed a lack of awareness of and interest in its operationalisation where more assistance from the institution could help.

Research limitations/implications

This research focussed on the institutional relationships relating to one organisation, albeit one which leads the way in terms of helping to accelerate emerging artist careers. However, best practice lessons emerge from the research in terms of informing similar institutions elsewhere. The authors move beyond quantitative measurement of cultural value activities in developing in-depth qualitative insight into these relationships so that more nuanced understanding is revealed.

Practical implications

There is a need to develop pathways to assist new graduates and for a more strategic focus by art institutions to help develop their careers by creating and sustaining impact and engagement in the marketplace. This will be of interest to policy makers in helping to shape programmes of assistance in the future beyond the art institution. The authors also uncover broader cultural value impacts beyond the exhibition site where these institutional relationships can contribute positively to health and well-being.

Originality/value

The exhibition is one of only a very limited number of similar events throughout the UK and can be viewed as a successful entrepreneurial intervention.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Ian Fillis, Kim Lehman, Ruth Rentschler and Boram Lee

This paper aims to provide clarity on arts marketing during COVID-19 by undertaking a critical review and theoretical integration of published cultural and creative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide clarity on arts marketing during COVID-19 by undertaking a critical review and theoretical integration of published cultural and creative industries (CCIs) data on the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on the findings from a content analysis of published refereed journal articles and research reports, between 2020 and 2022.

Findings

This study clarifies how scholars in the arts marketing field have examined the concept and identified core dimensions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for arts marketing during COVID-19. The framework outlines interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as digitisation, monetisation and sustainability of the CCIs and poses a future centred on entrepreneurial actions.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is that it provides clear-cut evidence for new frontiers for research in the field during a period of discontinuous change due to COVID-19, through a literature review that has not been undertaken previously. It links the need to be entrepreneurial as a means for the CCIs to survive and thrive during and after a global crisis.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Ian Fillis and Kim Lehman

The authors adopt a biographical methodology to investigate how a privately funded art museum has risen to become a key visitor destination on the island of Tasmania, Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors adopt a biographical methodology to investigate how a privately funded art museum has risen to become a key visitor destination on the island of Tasmania, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilise both entrepreneurship and consumption as collecting lenses to gain insight into the success of a new arts venture. In addition to biographical methodology the authors utilise in-depth interviews and participant observation.

Findings

The analysis shows what can be achieved when alternative paths to creativity and innovation are pursued. The creativity inherent in such actions does not necessarily have to be substantial. Sometimes incremental approaches to achieving something different from the norm are sufficient.

Research limitations/implications

Implications include the continued merits of adopting a biographical approach to uncovering longitudinal insight into interlinking entrepreneurship and consumption practices. This approach enables key impacting events over time to be identified as they impact on the direction taken by the art entrepreneur.

Practical implications

There is growing evidence that administrative approaches to arts governance are limiting in their effectiveness. This paper addresses the call to be more entrepreneurial in arts governance practices.

Originality/value

There are only a limited number of papers on entrepreneurship and consumption in the arts and this research adds to knowledge in the area.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Mark Wickham, Kim Lehman and Ian Fillis

This paper explores the nature of art as a product through a network perspective, accounting for key contributing stakeholders in shaping its essence.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the nature of art as a product through a network perspective, accounting for key contributing stakeholders in shaping its essence.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative data collection and analysis design and is centred on a series of face-to-face interviews with established Australian visual artists.

Findings

Results support the notion of an art product shaped by interconnections and interdependencies of actors in the art market. In particular, attention is paid to the roles of actors in conceptual, production and distribution networks.

Research limitations/implications

Although there are idiosyncrasies that (in part) define the Australian art market context, the issues identified here are nonetheless useful in determining the nature of the interconnectedness of the art market in other similar Western contexts. Many Australian artists have achieved similar recognition and status to other established artists elsewhere. Future cross-cultural comparative research should be carried out in order to assess this relationship in the longer term.

Practical implications

Artists at different stages of their careers can transfer the findings of this research into the development of a series of relevant strategies and tactics for developing their art and culture products more effectively.

Originality/value

Although philosophical assessments of art as a product have been carried out elsewhere, there is a lack of evaluation from an art versus marketplace lens in considering the perspectives of interested stakeholders

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2020

Özge Gökbulut Özdemir, Ian Fillis and Ayşe Baş Collins

The aim of the study is to gain insight into the link between art and tourism from a value co-creation perspective. This link is discussed with the help of the arts…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to gain insight into the link between art and tourism from a value co-creation perspective. This link is discussed with the help of the arts marketing, art tourism and value co-creation literature. The role of art in tourism and the role of cultural places in arts marketing are also evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Focussing on two cultural heritage sites in Turkey, Zeugma and Göbeklitepe, a qualitative study was undertaken in order to determine the value creation and co-creation processes occurring from the art–tourism contexts based on comparative case study analysis. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with three groups of actors. Motivation, expectation and stakeholder experiences were the main themes explored.

Findings

The findings of the study relate to the role of the co-creation process. Marketing art in alternative places creates value in closing the gap between art and society through the use of related fields such as culture and heritage. In terms of cultural value, the paper identifies the reconnection with cultural heritage through contemporary art. This is a way of looking at culture and its concepts in different time and place dimensions which make visitors more engaged with culture and its contemporary reflection through art.

Research limitations/implications

Although the research focusses on two Turkish art and tourism cases, future research can be extended to other countries, including the assessment of the longer-term role of similar activities.

Practical implications

As art is a subset of culture, the people who are interested in culture and history also have the potential to be interested in art. While art impacts on cultural tourism, cultural heritage and tourism work as arts marketing tools in a co-supporting way. The coming together of art and culture has societal benefits. There are lessons for practice such as the opening of a space for contemporary art in cultural heritage museums in order to promote art to society. The museum audience is an important potential for the future of art from a market generation perspective.

Originality/value

The study contribute to arts tourism, arts marketing and value co-creation in theory and practice.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2022

Ian Fillis and Kim Lehman

The authors provide an understanding of how the hero identity is culturally constructed and evolving. The authors focus on heroism within an arts marketing framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors provide an understanding of how the hero identity is culturally constructed and evolving. The authors focus on heroism within an arts marketing framework through an interrogation of Northern Ireland murals. In this paper, the authors elaborate on the links between arts marketing thought and the notion of hero and draw conclusions around what the authors see as a fruitful area for arts marketing theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have adopted a narrative approach, incorporating biographical method, visual analysis and ethnography in interpreting cultural murals. The authors assess representative examples in Northern Ireland using a thematic framework.

Findings

The murals the authors assessed have evolved from having a specific community focus to increasing numbers which now represent a “shared”, and therefore more modern version of the hero.

Research limitations/implications

The authors identify an emerging, aesthetically balanced portrayal of cultural murals, with a different set of heroic priorities compared to the past, which should encourage further related research elsewhere.

Practical implications

Northern Ireland murals are no longer the preserve of specific communities and are now also shared spaces which appeal to both the local population and cultural tourists.

Originality/value

Although analysis and evaluation of political murals has been carried out in other disciplines, the authors add to the limited insight from an arts marketing perspective.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Nicholas Wise, Özge Gökbulut Özdemir and Ian Fillis

While the theoretical interaction of the creative and cultural industries and entrepreneurship in business is gaining attention in the literature, such entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

While the theoretical interaction of the creative and cultural industries and entrepreneurship in business is gaining attention in the literature, such entrepreneurial practices are extending their role and position in the economy and in urban areas undergoing transformation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to that literature by generating a model that links creative entrepreneurship with urban transformation as places see and expect continuous change and development.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a conceptual approach, embedded in a triple helix model, of creative entrepreneurship and urban transformation of the Baltic Triangle area of Liverpool, England. The authors inform this through a case study analysis, including qualitative interview data relating to the Baltic Creative.

Findings

The authors demonstrate the need for interdisciplinary research to assess value creation, value delivery and innovation as contributors to urban transformation based on creative entrepreneurship, while at the same time resulting in creative placemaking.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper that will be used to frame future empirical research on generating additional insight by interviewing key actors to heighten understanding of innovation, value creation and value delivery process of placemaking, creative change and urban transformation.

Practical implications

This work can help inform creative policymaking, planning and development to achieve both social and economic impacts for a place and the wider region.

Originality/value

The authors both contextualize and show the transferability of the model, using the example of Liverpool’s Baltic Creative in Liverpool’s Baltic Triangle area of the city, highlighting the impact of creative change.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 April 2022

Nikolaos Sakellarios, Abel Duarte Alonso, Seng Kiat Kok, Seamus O’Brien, Ian Fillis and Oanh Thi Kim Vu

The purpose of this study is to ascertain factors that enable micro- and small firms (MSFs) to cope with the effects of a long-term crisis and develop a model which guides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to ascertain factors that enable micro- and small firms (MSFs) to cope with the effects of a long-term crisis and develop a model which guides conceptual understanding. This study’s setting is represented by the global financial crisis and by Cyprus and Greece, two nations severely affected.

Design/methodology/approach

On-site, unstructured, face-to-face interviews were conducted among 135 MSF leaders.

Findings

Sixteen different coping factors were identified as central to participants, resulting in the emergence of four key dimensions. Three dimensions, self-initiative, financial acumen and human attributes, are associated with entrepreneurs’ skills, initiatives, passion and networks, whereas one dimension, individual-firm advantage, considers firms’ and individuals’ valuable assets and resources, namely, image/reputation, quality or location. Almost two-thirds of participants recognised a lack of collaboration beyond their suppliers within their industry. Several intergroup differences were revealed, including Cypriot participants’ higher optimism concerning their firms’ future.

Originality/value

This study responds to calls for research that illuminates the understanding of firms’ ability to overcome inadequacies imposed by the socio-economic environment in which they operate. To this end, a theoretical framework emphasising the vital significance of four dimensions is proposed. Apart from their conceptual insightfulness, the dimensions identify clear associations with resilience and coping and can therefore be of practical value to micro–small-sized firms and their respective industry.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Ian Fillis

Previous work by the author has focused on examining the limitations of the marketing concept and its associated frameworks, processes and prescriptions focusing on a…

Abstract

Previous work by the author has focused on examining the limitations of the marketing concept and its associated frameworks, processes and prescriptions focusing on a planned, strategic, linear, lower risk future for the firm. Emerging research has shown that such frameworks are now dated, despite being continually taught at business schools. Recent research at the interface between Marketing and Entrepreneurship has shown that, as a result of the inadequacies identified, there is hope for the entrepreneurial marketer (practitioner and academician alike) through the generation of alternative perspectives, and ultimately the formation of competing paradigms of marketing enquiry. Small firm marketing research shows that theories of networking, creativity, opportunity recognition and word of mouth marketing are much more valid in terms of their explanation and understanding of how such a firm behaves, rather than to endeavour to fit the square pegs of traditional marketing theory into the dynamic holes of the smaller firm operating environment. Drawing on alternative methodologies from outside the realms of marketing, this paper presents some thoughts on the merits of embracing the philosophy of researchers and practitioners in the arts and other creative fields in order to reach a more valid understanding of smaller firm behaviour.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

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