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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Kirk Chang and Luo Lu

This study aimed to explore prevalent characteristics of organizational culture (OC) and common sources of work stress in a Taiwanese work context. The authors also aimed…

5817

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to explore prevalent characteristics of organizational culture (OC) and common sources of work stress in a Taiwanese work context. The authors also aimed to analyze how characteristics of OC may be linked to stressors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology of focus group discussions was adopted.

Findings

Four characteristics of OC were identified, including: family‐kin, informal work obligations, organizational loyalty and subgroup involvement. Job characteristics, home‐work interface, interpersonal relationships and career development were identified as common sources of work stress. Content analysis revealed that characteristics of OC could either alleviate or aggravate stress, depending on employees' perception and attribution. Double‐coding analysis indicated that stressors related to job characteristics seem particularly linked to informal work obligation but not to organizational loyalty as characteristics of OC.

Research limitations/implications

The exclusive reliance on qualitative methodology is a limitation of the present study. However, the results have both theoretical and practical implications. The authors note that Western findings regarding OC may not generalize completely to a different culture and the Taiwanese context supports distinctive features of OC and work stressors. Consequently, any effective corporate stress interventions should be formulated taking the core cultural values and practices into account.

Originality/value

The in‐depth and culture‐sensitive nature is a major thrust of the present study, and the focus on the link between OC and stress is a rare effort in the Pan‐Chinese cultural context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2019

Musarrat Shaheen, Farrah Zeba, Vaibhav Sekhar and Raveesh Krishnankutty

This paper aims to examine the influence of the work–family interface on both work engagement and the psychological capital (PsyCap) of the liquid workforce. Also, drawing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of the work–family interface on both work engagement and the psychological capital (PsyCap) of the liquid workforce. Also, drawing from the literature on consumer behaviour, the second objective of this paper is to investigate the impact of work engagement and PsyCap on customer advocacy.

Design/methodology

A dyadic study was conducted, comprising 200 nurses and 200 patients from different healthcare service providers of India. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the responses collected from nurses and the patients whom they served.

Findings

The results confirm that the home–work interface has a positive impact on work engagement and PsyCap. The findings also confirm a positive impact of PsyCap on customer advocacy, but the effect of work engagement on customer advocacy was not significant.

Research implications

This study confirms that to keep liquid workers engaged in their work and to enhance their personal PsyCap, an organisation should provide the opportunity to maintain a balance between work and home needs. The findings also confirm that personal psychological resources (PsyCap) facilitate prosocial helping behaviour, which keeps customers closer and maintains them as true representatives of the organisation.

Originality/value

The present study is one of only a few preliminary studies examining the predictors of work engagement of liquid workers. Also, an inter-disciplinary approach was taken to understand the link between employee-level variables (home–work interface, work engagement and PsyCap) and a customer-level variable (customer advocacy).

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Bruce Kirkcaldy, Jennifer Brown and Cary L. Cooper

The relationship between diverse demographic variables and the occupational stress indicator subscales (Cooper et al., 1988) were examined among several hundred UK senior…

2000

Abstract

The relationship between diverse demographic variables and the occupational stress indicator subscales (Cooper et al., 1988) were examined among several hundred UK senior police officers. Officers who prior to their promotion to superintendent had spent most of their time within the criminal detective branch displayed the highest Type A behaviour (aggressive, dominant and assertive), and traffic officers the worst subjective reports of psychological and physical health. Superintendents whose present role is in the CID displayed the highest level of job satisfaction. There was some indication that women senior police officers used stress‐coping techniques ‐ particularly task strategies and home‐work ‐ more frequently than did men; otherwise no gender differences were found in terms of the other scales of job stress and satisfaction. Marital status was related to Type A behaviour and coping techniques, and parenthood with job‐related pressure and job satisfaction. More specifically, parents reported less stress in the home‐work interface than non‐parents, and were more likely to report more satisfaction in the organisational structure of the police service. The impact of tenure on “controllability” and Type A was moderated by police rank, that is, ambitiousness was significantly negatively correlated with tenure for superintendents but not so for chief‐superintendents. Finally, educational qualifications/ level was related to job satisfaction. Overall job satisfaction (especially satisfaction with personal relationships at work as well as satisfaction with the organisational structure) was lowest for the most highly educated personnel (recipients of a higher degree).

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

B.D. Kirkcaldy, R.M. Trimpop and S. Williams

A large sample of German and British managers selected from the private and public sectors completed the pressure management indicator (PMI). The PMI is a 120‐item…

4614

Abstract

A large sample of German and British managers selected from the private and public sectors completed the pressure management indicator (PMI). The PMI is a 120‐item self‐report questionnaire developed from the occupational stress indicator (OSI). The PMI provides a global measure as well as differentiated profiles of occupational stress. Outcome measures include work satisfaction, organisational security, organisational satisfaction, and commitment, as well as physical wellbeing (physical symptoms and exhaustion) and psychological health (anxiety depression, worry and resilience). In addition moderator variables are assessed including type A behaviour, internal locus of control and coping strategies. The data from the PMI show that, when compared with British managers, the German managers reported greater job satisfaction and lower levels of resilience. The German managers displayed substantially higher pressure from the home‐work interface but less pressure from the need to have their achievements recognised. German managers reported higher levels of impatience (a sub‐scale of type A behaviour), coupled with high internal control (extent to which individual feels able to influence and control events) and made more use of coping strategies, especially problem focussed measures.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Vivien K.G. Lim and Thompson S.H. Teo

Examines gender differences in occupational stress and coping strategies among information technology (IT) personnel in Singapore. Data were collected via a combination of…

3819

Abstract

Examines gender differences in occupational stress and coping strategies among information technology (IT) personnel in Singapore. Data were collected via a combination of mail surveys and semi‐structured interviews. Analyses results of the survey using analysis of covariance procedures. Female IT personnel reported significantly higher scores on sources of stress originating from “factors intrinsic to the job”, “managerial role”, “career and achievement”, “organizational structure and climate”, and “relationships with others”. Contrary to initial prediction, no significant gender difference was found for stress originating from “home‐work interface”. With respect to coping strategies, female IT personnel tend to seek social support and talk to others when they experience stress, while men tend to suppress their emotions and deal with problems in a logical and unemotional manner. Discusses implications of findings.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Cynthia Forson

Employing a feminist relational lens, the purpose of this paper is to explore the work-life balance experiences of black migrant women entrepreneurs, examining the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Employing a feminist relational lens, the purpose of this paper is to explore the work-life balance experiences of black migrant women entrepreneurs, examining the relationship between macro, meso and micro levels of business activity. The paper examines the obstacles raised and opportunities enabled by the confrontation and negotiation between the private and public space.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods are used and the paper draws on semi-structured in-depth interviews with 29 black women business owners in the legal and black hairdressing sectors in London. The analysis of the paper is informed by a relational approach that recognises the embedded nature of business activity in differing levels of social action.

Findings

The analysis reveals that ability of the women in the study to manage their work-life balance was shaped by power relations and social interactions between and within cultural, structural and agentic dimensions of small business ownership.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on business and entrepreneurial behaviour of women by embedding work-life balance experiences of black migrant women in context of relations between and within macro, meso and micro levels. It conceptualises the behaviour of the women in the study in terms of confrontations, negotiations and dialogue between notions of motherhood, femininity, family and entrepreneurship at the societal, institutional and individual levels. In so doing the paper expands the literature on minority entrepreneurship and underscores the interconnected nature of these three levels to produce unique experiences for individual migrant women.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Valerie J. Sutherland

The impact of a major organizational change on generalpractitioners in the UK was assessed using a postal questionnaire duringJuly‐August 1990. The results were compared…

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Abstract

The impact of a major organizational change on general practitioners in the UK was assessed using a postal questionnaire during July‐August 1990. The results were compared with those obtained in a previous survey in November 1987. A total of 917 (61 per cent response rate) general practitioners completed the questionnaire measuring aspects of the job causing stress, job satisfaction and mental wellbeing. Compared with 1987, doctors in 1990 experienced significantly decreased levels of job satisfaction and reported levels of somatic anxiety and depression were higher. The stress associated with the demands of the job and patients′ expectations, practice administration and routine medical work, role stress and the use of social support as a coping strategy were the strongest predictors of job dissatisfaction and poor psychological wellbeing.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Laura Galloway, John W. Sanders, Jo Bensemann and Alexei Tretiakov

This article explores the small unit of family business – being in business with one's spouse – in Scotland and New Zealand. With reference to social network theory, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the small unit of family business – being in business with one's spouse – in Scotland and New Zealand. With reference to social network theory, the research explores if the strong married relationship enhances business or inhibits it due to a hypothesised limiting effect on access to external networks. The paper thus measures the impact of networks on copreneurial business performance and explores perceptions of the copreneurial experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The research applies a mixed methodology. First, a quantitative sample of 301 small firms in Scotland and New Zealand is tested for variation in performance and social network reach between copreneurial, other types of family firms and firms with no family links. Thereafter, a qualitative study explores the experience of 101 copreneurs in the two countries, to which a thematic analysis is applied.

Findings

Networks are shown to be central influences on performance, but the paper finds no performance or network reach variation between copreneurial and other business. Nevertheless, copreneurship is perceived both positively and negatively by practitioners and testimonies include explicit reference to strategies to manage home/work tensions.

Originality/value

The paper contributes new data on performance in copreneurial firms in two international locations. Viewed through a social network theory lens, the research shows the utility of networks to business, family or otherwise. The paper also shows that the work/family interface in copreneurial firms is perceived both as an advantage and as a challenge and so requires careful management.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Susan Gill and Marilyn J. Davidson

Investigates the problems and pressures facing lone mothers in management and professional occupations. Qualitative data were gained from semi‐structured interviews with…

2136

Abstract

Investigates the problems and pressures facing lone mothers in management and professional occupations. Qualitative data were gained from semi‐structured interviews with 20 lone mothers, and the sample also completed the Pressure Management Indicator questionnaire. The interviews revealed that the lone mothers experienced some of the problems and pressures previously reported by women in dual career couples, including difficulties with childcare, work overload and role conflict, but to a much greater degree. Finds also that the death of a partner, separation or divorce affects the career aspirations and career development of the women in the sample and that the lone mothers were less able to take advantage of job‐sharing and part‐time working because of greater financial pressures. The lone mothers reported higher levels of pressure from workload and the home/work balance than comparative normative groups. However, as stress moderating strategies they employed better use of problem‐focussed coping than other women and made more use of social support than other managers.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2018

Jenny Sok, Robert Jan Blomme, Melanie De Ruiter, Debbie Tromp and X.D. Lub

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between home-to-work spillover, measured as positive and negative home–work interference (HWI) and turnover intentions, as…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between home-to-work spillover, measured as positive and negative home–work interference (HWI) and turnover intentions, as well as the mediating role of perceptions concerning training and development practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected among 418 respondents who were working at two business schools. A confirmative structural equation modeling analysis was conducted for the analysis.

Findings

As expected, positive HWI showed negative relationships with turnover intentions, while negative HWI related positively to turnover intentions. Training and development practices mediated the relationship between positive HWI and turnover intentions; the mediation effect was stronger for women than it was for men. Training and development practices did not mediate the relationship between negative HWI and turnover intentions, however.

Practical implications

The outcomes suggest that helping employees to balance their work and home lives can be beneficial for employees, as well as for employers in terms of reducing turnover intentions.

Originality/value

As contributions, additional insight into the relationship between positive and negative non-work factors and turnover intentions by examining the ways in which both positive as well as negative HWI are related to turnover intentions. Furthermore, the research considers the mediating role played by perceptions concerning human resource (HR) practices, and particularly training and development practices as perceived by the employee, in the relationship between positive and negative HWI and turnover intentions.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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