Search results

1 – 10 of over 172000
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Kaylene Zaretzky and J. Kenton Zumwalt

Earlier research found that firms with the highest distress risk have low book‐to‐market (B/M) ratios and low returns. This paper aims to examine the robustness of those's…

2794

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier research found that firms with the highest distress risk have low book‐to‐market (B/M) ratios and low returns. This paper aims to examine the robustness of those's results and provide further evidence that high distress‐risk firms do not enjoy the same high returns earned by high B/M firms and that distress risk is unlikely to explain the Fama and French high‐minus‐low (HML) B/M factor.

Design/methodology/approach

A distress‐risk measure, distressed‐minus‐solvent (DMS), is calculated and a range of zero investment distress‐risk trading strategies is investigated. Value‐ and equal‐weighted portfolios are examined both with negative book‐equity firms and without. These most distressed firms have low or negative B/M values and would either not be included in the Fama and French sample or included in the low B/M portfolio.

Findings

The paper finds that the DMS factor is negative and significant, and none of the zero investment strategies earns significantly positive returns.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that exposure to distress risk does not earns investors a positive risk premium. It appears that over the period examined, market inefficiencies drive the market value and returns of high distress‐risk firms.

Originality/value

The distress‐risk premium is shown to be negative and, therefore, cannot be driven by bankruptcy risk alone. The negative premium is not consistent with a financial distress explanation for the Fama and French HML factor.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Yongqiang Sun, Fei Zhang and Yafei Feng

This paper aimed to explain why individuals still tend to disclose their privacy information even when privacy risks are high and whether individuals disclose or withhold…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to explain why individuals still tend to disclose their privacy information even when privacy risks are high and whether individuals disclose or withhold information following the same logic.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a configurational decision tree model (CDTM) for precisely understanding individuals' decision-making process of privacy disclosure. A survey of location-based social network service (LBSNS) users was conducted to collect data, and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) was adopted to validate the hypotheses.

Findings

This paper identified two configurations for high and low disclosure, respectively, and found that the benefits and the risks did not function independently but interdependently, and the justice would play a crucial role when both the benefits and the risks were high. Furthermore, the authors found that there were asymmetric mechanisms for high disclosure and low disclosure, and males focused more on perceived usefulness, while females concerned more about perceived enjoyment, privacy risks and perceived justice.

Originality/value

This paper further extends privacy calculus model (PCM) and deepens the understanding of the privacy calculus process from a configurational perspective. In addition, this study also provides guidance for future research on how to adopt the configurational approach with qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to revise and improve relevant theories for information systems (IS) behavioral research.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2014

Stephanie D. Grimm and Sheneeta W. White

Section 404 of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act (SOX) altered the relationship between auditors and their clients by requiring an external audit of companies’ internal controls…

Abstract

Section 404 of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act (SOX) altered the relationship between auditors and their clients by requiring an external audit of companies’ internal controls. Regulatory guidance is interpreted and applied by external auditors to comply with SOX. The purpose of this paper is to apply service operations management theories and techniques to the internal control audit process to better understand the role regulatory guidance plays in audit services. We discuss service operations management theories that apply to the production of audit services and employ the operations management technique of simulation to examine the effects of a historical relationship between the client and the auditor, information sharing between the client and the auditor, and the auditor’s perceived risk of the client on the internal control audit process. The application of service operations management theories and the simulation results illustrate that risk and information sharing are key factors for the audit process. The results suggest the updated Public Company Accounting Oversight Board guidance from Auditing Standard 2 to Auditing Standard 5 appropriately increased audit effectiveness by encouraging risk-based judgments and information sharing. This paper merges accounting and service operations management research to examine the effects of regulatory guidance on the internal control audit process. The paper uses simulation to illustrate the importance of interpreting regulatory guidance and the specific effects of risk and information sharing on the internal control audit process.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-163-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Understanding the Investor: A Maltese Study of Risk and Behavior in Financial Investment Decisions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-705-9

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Alex Johanes Simamora

This research aims to examine the moderating role of managerial ability on the relationship between risk-taking behavior and firms' performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the moderating role of managerial ability on the relationship between risk-taking behavior and firms' performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses 383 manufacturing firm-years listed on the Indonesian Stock Exchange as the research sample. The hypothesis test uses fixed-effect regression analysis.

Findings

The result shows that risk-taking behavior has a positive effect on firms' performance for higher managerial ability. Managerial ability provides higher knowledge, skill and information to get benefits and mitigate costs of risk-taking behavior to improve firms' performance. The role of managerial ability to make risk-taking behavior increase firms' performance occurs more for high-ability managers, dual CEO, shareholder-CEO and family CEO.

Originality/value

This research contributes to answering the conflicting arguments and filling the previous findings gap between risk-taking behavior and firm performance by considering managerial ability as a factor to create effective risk mitigation.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1977

John Newall

Examines the behaviour of the industrial buyer, and studies the purchasing of reprographic equipment. Looks at straight replacement purchases, first time purchases…

Abstract

Examines the behaviour of the industrial buyer, and studies the purchasing of reprographic equipment. Looks at straight replacement purchases, first time purchases, rebuys involving high cost equipment and rebuys due to dissatisfaction, in terms of a perceived risk model. Accepts that the industrial communications practitioner receives much less planning guidance than his consumer‐based counterpart. States current research is founded on the belief that a theory of communication appropriate to industrial buying must take on 6 main points – these are itemised and discussed. Discusses research design; research methodology; the determinants of perceived risk in industrial buying; risk handling behaviour in industrial buying; and a perceived risk model of buyer behaviour and its implications for competitive industrial marketing policy – all these are examined in great depth and each one given individual conclusions. Concludes that these examples by no means exhaust all the possible empirical bases from which industrial marketing policies may be devised, they serve to illustrate the way in which the model can be realistically applied to derive such competitive policies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

George K. Chacko

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today…

7943

Abstract

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today. Considers the marketing strategies employed, together with the organizational structures used and looks at the universal concepts that can be applied to any product. Uses anecdotal evidence to formulate a number of theories which can be used to compare your company with the best in the world. Presents initial survival strategies and then looks at ways companies can broaden their boundaries through manipulation and choice. Covers a huge variety of case studies and examples together with a substantial question and answer section.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

5725

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Igor Kotlyar, Leonard Karakowsky, Mary Jo Ducharme and Janet A. Boekhorst

– The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine how status-based labels, based on future capabilities, can impact people's risk tolerance in decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine how status-based labels, based on future capabilities, can impact people's risk tolerance in decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the authors developed and tested theoretical arguments using a set of three studies employing a scenario-based approach and a total of 449 undergraduate business students.

Findings

The findings suggest that labeling people in terms of future capabilities can trigger perceptions of public scrutiny and influence their risk preferences. Specifically, the results reveal that individuals who are recipients of high-status labels tend to choose lower risk decision options compared to their peers.

Research limitations/implications

The study employed scenarios to examine the issue of employee labeling. The extent to which these scenarios have truly captured the dynamics of labeling is questionable, and future research should employ a field-based study to examine whether the reported effect can be observed in a “real” work context.

Practical implications

Organizations are concerned about their future leadership capacity and often attempt to grow leadership talent by identifying high-potential employees early on. The results of this study suggest that such practice may have an unintentional negative effect of reducing high-potentials’ tolerance toward risky decision making, thus potentially impacting these future leaders’ decision making in the realm of corporate strategy, R&D, etc.

Originality/value

The issue of how labeling individuals in terms of future capabilities can impact their risk preference has been largely ignored by organizational research. This paper suggests that the popular practice of identifying high-potential employees may have unintentional negative effects by lowering their risk tolerance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Daniel A. Sheinin and Janet Wagner

As sales of store brands increase, retailers are shifting their store branding strategies by raising store brand prices, extending their store brand assortments to high

5649

Abstract

As sales of store brands increase, retailers are shifting their store branding strategies by raising store brand prices, extending their store brand assortments to highrisk categories, and marketing store brands in high retail image formats. The purpose of the research is to explore the effects of these changes on consumers’ judgments of store brands. The conceptual framework is derived from pricing, prospect, and information processing theories. It is tested in two experiments. The study finds that consumers’ use of price information varies by decision‐making context. In particular, price‐based effects for store brands are moderated by the contextual factors of category risk and retail image.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 172000